Funding Opportunities

Funding Opportunities

For College of Arts and Sciences Faculty

The Office of Sponsored Projects shares opportunities that support Arts and Sciences faculty research.

These are highly competitive and interested faculty are encouraged to contact Sarah Bricknell to ensure your research is a good match for the funder's priorities.

Questions? Contact

Sarah Bricknell, MBA, Sponsored Research Officer
Office of Sponsored Projects (OSP)
Email

Opportunities: Fixed Deadlines

Society for the Scientific Study of Religion Research Grants – May 1, 2021 deadline 

Jack Shand Research Grants support research in the social scientific study of religion. While individual grants do not ordinarily exceed $5000, it is possible to make a special request for more, to be considered at the committee's discretion. Applicants must have finished the Ph.D. degree and must be members of SSSR. In the case of co–authored requests, one author must be a member. Intellectual merit is the criterion by which proposals will be evaluated. 

Wenner-Gren Post-PhD Research Grants – May 1, 2021 deadline (Awarded directly to individual; not routed through OSP) 

Post-Ph.D. Research Grants support research that demonstrates a clear link to anthropological theory and debates, and promises to make a solid contribution to advancing these ideas. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, or subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that employ a comparative perspective, can generate innovative approaches or ideas, and/or integrate two or more subfields. The maximum amount of the Post-Ph.D. Research Grant is US $20,000

Russell Sage Foundation – May 4, 2021 deadline 

The Russell Sage Foundation is dedicated to programs of social science research.  Investigators are encouraged to submit an LOI after they have developed and pre-tested survey instruments, completed preliminary data analyses if the data are publicly-available or conducted some preliminary interviews for qualitative studies.  For the May deadline, RSF will accept letters of inquiry (LOIs) under these core programs and special initiatives: Behavioral EconomicsDecision Making & Human Behavior in ContextFuture of WorkSocial, Political and Economic Inequality

In addition, RSF will also accept LOIs relevant to any of its core programs that address at least one of the following issues:

  1. Research on the Covid-19 pandemic and the resulting recession in the U.S. Specifically, research that assesses the social, political, economic, and psychological causes and consequences of the pandemic, especially its effects on marginalized individuals and groups and on trust in government and other institutions. Our priorities do not include analyses of health outcomes or health behaviors. RSF seldom supports studies  focused on outcomes such as educational processes or curricular issues, but does prioritize analyses of inequities in educational attainment or student performance. 
  2. Research focused on systemic racial inequality and/or the recent mass protests in the U.S. Specifically, research that investigates the prevalence of racial disparities in policing and criminal justice and their social, political, economic, and psychological causes and consequences; the effects of the current social protest movement and mass mobilization against systemic discrimination; the nature of public attitudes and public policies regarding policing, criminal justice, and social welfare; and the effects of those attitudes in the current political environment.

William T. Grant Foundation - May 5, 2021 deadline 

The Foundation’s mission is to support research to improve the lives of young people ages 5-25 in the United States. WTG Foundation seeks studies that aim to build, test, or increase understanding of programs, policies, or practices to reduce inequality in the academic, social, behavioral, or economic outcomes of young people. They prioritize studies about reducing inequality on the basis of race, ethnicity, economic standing, language minority status, or immigrant origins. Major research grants on reducing inequality typically range between $100,000 and $600,000 and cover two to three years of support.  Officers’ research grants on reducing inequality are a separate funding mechanism for smaller projects with budgets ranging from $5,000 to $50,000, and are not included in the May deadline (accepted in January and August deadlines).

NEA Grants for Arts Projects – June 16, 2021 deadline

Grants for Arts Projects is the National Endowment for the Arts’ principal grants program for organizations based in the United States. Through project-based funding, the program supports public engagement with, and access to, various forms of art across the nation, the creation of excellent art, learning in the arts at all stages of life, and the integration of the arts into the fabric of community life.  Applicants may request cost share/matching grants ranging from $10,000 to $100,000.

NSF's Developmental Sciences Program – July 15 deadline 

NSF The Developmental Sciences Program supports basic research that increases our understanding of cognitive, linguistic, social, cultural, and biological processes related to human development across the lifespan. Research supported by this program will add to our knowledge of the underlying developmental processes that support social, cognitive, and behavioral functioning, thereby illuminating ways for individuals to live productive lives as members of society. Developmental Science supports research that addresses developmental processes within the domains of cognitive, social, emotional, and motor development across the lifespan by working with any appropriate populations for the topics of interest including infants, children, adolescents, adults, and non-human animals. The program also supports research investigating factors that affect developmental change including family, peers, school, community, culture, media, physical, genetic, and epigenetic influences. Additional priorities include research that: incorporates multidisciplinary, multi-method, microgenetic, and longitudinal approaches; develops new methods, models, and theories for studying development; includes participants from a range of ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and cultures; and integrates different processes (e.g., memory, emotion, perception, cognition), levels of analysis (e.g., behavioral, social, neural), and time scales.  

National Science Foundation -  Accountable Institutions and Behavior (AIB) Program  - August 16, 2021  deadline 

Supports basic scientific research that advances knowledge and understanding of issues broadly related to attitudes, behavior, and institutions connected to public policy and the provision of public services. Research proposals are expected to be theoretically motivated, conceptually precise, methodologically rigorous, and empirically oriented. Substantive areas include (but are not limited to) the study of individual and group decision-making, political institutions (appointed or elected), attitude and preference formation and expression, electoral processes and voting, public administration, and public policy. This work can focus on a single case or can be done in a comparative context, either over time or cross-sectionally. The Program also supports research experiences for undergraduate students and infrastructural activities, including methodological innovations. 

Opportunities: Rolling Deadlines

Though your professional organizations and colleagues, have you learned of a funding opportunity that isn’t listed? If you have a potential funding/sponsorship opportunity to share with our community, please complete the information below. Sarah Bricknell will review the funder and contact you with any questions. Thank you for sharing and helping to build our database of funding opportunities.