Social Justice, Inclusion and Intersectionality

Bringing the mission to the moment

In his 2017 Arts and Sciences Convocation remarks, Dean David Powers identified how we live the social justice part of our mission and identity today as a priority for the College, as well as Seattle University. He said, “I believe that now is a time to stand more firmly within our mission rather than shy away from it in the face of cultural and political headwinds.”

He continued, “Racism, religious discrimination, sexism, heterosexism and income disparity, these intersectional issues are at the heart of social injustice today. Addressing these issues is central to our mission, and I think we need to avoid the current cultural trap of seeing these issues, and particularly racism only as ‘out there’ and not as ‘in here’.”

As a College, we will be exploring matters of social justice, inclusion, and intersectionality together. This page will be a place where we can share resources and events with one another and highlight some of the ongoing work that faculty and staff have been doing in our College. Everyone is encouraged to submit links to articles and other information and events, both on and off campus, that can help us all learn more.

A multi-ethnic group of Seattle University students

Resources

This section is available to share resources and information that will help us all further our work regarding social justice, inclusion and intersectionality. Please send proposed content to Dr. Sonora Jha and Karen Bystrom.

Leadership Committee on Intersectionality and Justice

  • Sarah Curtis-Tilton (18FQ-21SQ) Staff
  • Michael Ninen (18FQ-20SQ) Student
  • Serena Oduro (18FQ-20SQ) Student
  • Gary Perry, PhD, (17FQ-21SQ**) Sociology, T/TT
  • Hye-Kyung Kang, PhD, (19FQ-20SQ) Social Work, T/TT
  • Jason Wirth, PhD, (17FQ-20SQ) Philosophy, T/TT
  • Sonora Jha, PhD, Associate Dean of Academic Community, ex-officio

Questions about this site?

  • Sonora Jha, PhD, Associate Dean for Academic Community & Professor, Communications, 206.296.5347
  • Karen Bystrom, Director of Marketing & Communications, Arts & Sciences, 206.296.2814
 An Ignatian Witness to Truth: SU’s Mission and Racial Justice
  • November 13, 2017

A group of 55 SU faculty and staff participated in this event, co-sponsored by the Center for Jesuit Education and the Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion. They shared a robust and productive discussion, which centered around the article and presentation given by Bryan Massingale, Professor at Fordham, who invites us to see the very heart of Jesuit Education as the work of changing consciousness about racial injustice.  Watch or read Massingale’s talk. The article can also be found in the print edition of “Conversations in Jesuit Higher Education” magazine.

Bryan Massingale presented his talk at the Commitment to Justice Conference held at Seattle University in August 2017.  The other conference keynote addresses from Eboo Patel, Founder of the Interfaith Youth Corps, and Simone Campbell, of NETWORK are also available online.

The Cost of Balancing Academia and Racism
  • Jan. 21, 2016, The Atlantic, by Adrienne Green

Researchers say that discrimination at colleges and universities may have negative impacts on black students’ mental health. Read the article.

An African American woman graduating from Seattle University in 2015

Events

This is a space for sharing events that provide additional educational opportunities, both on campus and in the community. All regular on campus events posted on the master calendar will be automatically included. If you would like to submit additional events, send the following to Karen Bystrom.

  • Name of event
  • Date, time
  • Link to more information

Links to the events sponsored by the Office of Diversity & Inclusion and Office of Multicultural Affairs are provided as additional content on this page.

Imagining the World: Photography Competition Exhibition

Now on view

Kinsey Gallery, ADAL

Our 11th annual exhibition of award-winner photos by study-abroad students, international students and faculty. You can also view the photos online here.

Up from the Table, a new exhibition by Creative Justice

September 28 - November 24

Hedreen Gallery

An exhibition of new work by artists and cultural organizers working with Creative Justice, an arts-based alternative to incarceration for young people in King County. The exhibition features photography, sculpture, textile and sound created by the youth artists of Creative Justice in collaboration with program mentor artists Dan Paz, Le’Ecia Farmer, Ashley Tiedeman and Olisa Enrico and program directors Aaron Counts and Nikkita Oliver. The work explores the human cost of mass incarceration and the school-to-prison pipeline. Hours and location here.

Sanctuary Print Shop: Seattle

October 24-February 21, 2020

Vachon Gallery

An immersive, participatory research and art exhibition by Sergio De La Torre and Chris Treggiari’s Sanctuary City Project. Learn more.

2019 William Leroux Lecture: Lessons for Artificial Intelligence from African Knowledge Systems

October 29, 4:00 p.m

Bannan Auditorium

Fr. Kizito Kiyamba, SJ from Arrupe University, Zimbabwe 

A free lecture open to the public. Human intelligence ought to play a normative role, not only a descriptive one, in the designation of artificial systems (AIS) as intelligent. And yet human intelligence as rationality has often gone astray and excused or even facilitated events and choices that are otherwise unjustifiable (e.g., holocausts, eugenic efforts). What then is left as a sure reference for intelligence in humans, which we can then impart to AIS? More information...

My Life in Another Language

November 2112:30-2 p.m.

LeRoux Room (STCN 160)

Four speakers will come tell stories of how language shaped their lives, light appetizers and refreshments will be provided. Sponsored by the Modern Languages Department

What is Happening to Our Norms Against Racist Speech?

December 5, 5 p.m.

Pigott Auditorium

Featuring Jenny Saul, PhD, University of Waterloo. Until recently, the accepted wisdom in the US was that overt racism would doom a national political campaign. This led to the use of covert messaging strategies like dog whistles. Recent political events have called this wisdom into question. Professor Saul's lecture will  explore what has happened in recent years to our norms against racist speech.

45 plays for 45 Presidents by Andy Bayiates, Sean Benjamin, Genevra Gallo-Bayiates, Chloe Johnston, and Karen Weinberg, directed by Jane Nichols

February 19-23 and February 26-March 1

Lee Center for the Arts

Brush up on your presidential knowledge and get prepped for the 2020 elections by journeying through this fast paced, irreverently comical portrayal of every US president.  This hilarious and incisive collage of American political history as revealed through the lives of our presidents, was first created in 2004 by the Neo-Futurists as 43 Plays for 43 Presidents and has been updated to remain current for each new election cycle.  Throughout the evening you’ll experience the Neo -Futurists’ particular brand of irreverent experimental theatre through their insightful, musical, tragic, bizarre and painfully funny takes on leadership in our country – just in time for election season!

Marisol  by Jose Rivera, directed by Rosa Joshi

May 7-10 and 13-17

Lee Center for the Arts

No one has seen the moon for months.  All the food has turned to salt.  God is frail and dying and the angels have gone to war.  This is the landscape in which we encounter Marisol, a young professional living in the Bronx, who is just trying to survive.  How will she survive a disintegrating world that has been thrown off its physical, ethical and spiritual moorings?  Initially written in 1992, Jose Rivera’s apocalyptic fantasia, -- part absurdist, part magical realism -- remains fiercely relevant as an exploration of homelessness and mental illness in a society facing ecological peril and deep civil discord.

Events - Office of Diversity & Inclusion