Latest Updates

Fall Quarter Updates

Posted by Megan Otis on October 4, 2018 at 1:10 PM PDT

Hello Seattle U Content Editors:

Welcome to the 2018-19 academic year! The Web Team has had a very busy summer and we have lots of updates and news to share with you all.

CMS Training Now Fully Online

We are very excited to announce that we have launched our new, fully-online, and expanded training course in Canvas for new content editors. The new training course encompasses:

  • Using the TerminalFour content management system (CMS)
  • Creating great web content, including web content guidelines, writing for the web, and working with images
  • Website accessibility

We hope that by offering fully-online training through Canvas, it will be a more effective, efficient, and easier way to get new users trained more quickly. All new content editors will be added to the Canvas course at the same time as their T4 accounts are being created.

But all TerminalFour users are welcome to request access to the Canvas training course if you would like a refresher or you’d like to learn some new things; just let us know that you’d like to have access to the Canvas training course, and we will get you added.

Forum on Web Accessibility

Beginning this year, the MarCom Web Team will start offering a quarterly forum for all content editors to provide you with information and training on important topics related to your Seattle U website and the TerminalFour content management system.

This fall, we will be holding a forum on website accessibility on

  • Wednesday, October 31 | 1:30-2:30 | Wyckoff Auditorium

Please RSVP to the web forum if you’re planning to attend. If you’re interested but can’t attend on Oct. 31, please let us know that as well. If there is enough interest, we will schedule a second session on a different day and time.

Website Style Changes

You might have noticed some slight changes to the visual style of the text on the website. Recently we’ve made some small tweaks to our global style sheet, based on feedback from content editors and website users.

  • The text size and spacing between the lines of normal paragraph text, and the section navigation menu, has been increased slightly to improve readability.
  • All-caps page titles have been changes to sentence case.
  • Some of the headings styles have changed to improve readability and consistency.

You can expect to see additional small tweaks over the next month or so. Thank you to everyone who has provided us with feedback; it is very important and valuable to us.

University Changes That May Impact Your Website Content 

Over the summer and so far this fall, the university has had a number of changes that you need to be aware of in case these changes need to be reflected on your Seattle U websites.

  • Shane P. Martin has begun his term as the new Provost. Robert Dullea resumes his role as Vice President for Planning and Vice Provost.
  • Matteo Ricci College has now moved within the College of Arts and Sciences and is now Matteo Ricci Institute. Former MRC Dean, Paulette Kidder’s new title is Director.
  • Career Services has become the Career Engagement Office and their URL is now www.seattleu.edu/careerengagement.
  • The office of Disabilities Services has changed its name and is now the office of Disability Services, and their URL is www.seattleu.edu/disability-services/.
  • Chartwells has taken over for Bon Appetit. The new website for Dining Services and Catering is https://www.dineoncampus.com/seattleu.
  • The Master of Sport Administration and Leadership (MSAL) program in the College of Arts and Sciences has now moved to Albers School of Business and Economics and has changed name to Master of Sport Business Leadership (MSBL), and their new website is https://www.seattleu.edu/business/master-sport-business-leadership/.
  • The Law School Annex (LSAX) building is now the Harding (HRDG) building.
  • The university is transitioning from TargetX to Slate to handle transfer and graduate student applications for admission, so the Web Team has tried to find all the links to TargetX and replace them with links to a new routing page to help point prospective transfer and graduate students in the direction of the platform they need to use to apply. If you still have direct links to TargetX on your website, please get in touch with us for assistance in replacing those links.

If your websites include mention of any of the above, please be sure to update your website content to reflect these changes.

If you have any questions about any of the above, please let us know. And as always, thank you for everything you do to keep our websites up-to-date and looking great.

Best wishes,

The MarCom Web Team
Jason Beardriel and Megan Otis

Reflecting on Truth, Power and Sexual Misconduct

Posted by Scott McClellan on June 12, 2018 at 8:06 AM PDT

Several thoughts have been running through my head as I reflect more deeply on the feature piece from last Thursday’s The Spectator, the final edition of the academic year. Let me briefly cover three.

One thought is are we doing all we can, as best we can to address sexual misconduct? It is a serious issue that has been receiving unprecedented attention this past year. That is a good thing. We, as a university community, have a special obligation to use the increased attention and awareness as a force for good when it comes to addressing violence, harassment, discrimination and stalking. We, as a Catholic and Jesuit university, have an even greater responsibility to continue reconciling the Church’s horrid past on sexual misconduct with healing and compassion for survivors and an unyielding commitment to combating sexual abuse and violence to make sure it is never again repeated.

There is always more we can and must do—and we are learning from our students as much as we are from each other as we go about this important work.

I am grateful for the team of professionals and experts across our faculty, staff, administration and Jesuit community who have been facing and addressing these issues for many years—particularly since the scandal within the Catholic Church was exposed by The Boston Globe’s “Spotlight Investigation: Abuse in the Catholic Church” in 2002. These colleagues are good people committed to doing their jobs as best they can, as are our trustees. Many of us are parents of young children and have born witness to and shared in the pain of a loved one who has experienced sexual misconduct in various shapes and forms.

A second thought revolves around truth and power. Speaking truth to power and truth about power is something our Jesuit education calls our students to have the courage to do. We won’t get to a more just and humane world without courageous changemakers. How best and most effectively to go about it in order to be a force for good is a learning process, one that must always be rooted in honesty, integrity, ethics and, perhaps more importantly than ever in this Age of Trump, facts.

I’ve been down the truth-to-power road before in my own small way. It is not easy. There are risks and consequences. No doubt our student reporters were seeking to do right and risk the consequences.

Which brings me to the third thought. If you are going to speak truth to power in hopes of making a positive and lasting difference, getting it right in terms of accuracy, facts and context is essential. This holds true especially on an issue of such gravity and consequence as sexual misconduct.

Unfortunately, the student reporters fell short in this regard in their feature on sexual misconduct. I was surprised by the multiple inaccuracies, omission of facts and quotes taken out of context.

In recent weeks, some of the very same student journalists did a great job reporting in support of our LGBTQ+ community—it was powerful and persuasive. I personally commended them for their reporting.

Over the course of the past few days, however, I have asked for them to be accountable for this most recent feature on sexual misconduct and their own journalistic shortcomings. I appreciate the corrections they have issued and the removal of the three lead paragraphs in the online version, which contained at least three demonstrably false pieces of information. Although I am not sure the corrections and updates fully meet what is called for under journalistic standards, it was an important step.

If we are to have honest conversation on these issues, we need to do so based on accurate information, facts and context and do due diligence to avoid innuendo, insinuation and painting with so broad a brush as to unintentionally tarnish reputations of good people.

I believe the student journalists will learn from this episode and exercise greater care and professionalism in the future, just as I know I will continue reflecting on how we, as a university, can do more to address the important topics they have had the courage to tackle. To those Spectator reporters who are graduating this week, I wish you well knowing you will go on speaking truth to power and comforting the afflicted and afflicting the comfortable as you pursue careers in journalism. To those Spectator reporters who are continuing their studies, I look forward to learning with and from you.

May 2018 Updates

Posted by Megan Otis on May 31, 2018 at 2:05 PM PDT

Happy Thursday, content editors:

We have some announcements for you all!

Monthly website improvement topics

Following up on past topics: Misspellings and Broken links

If you have not yet fixed all of the misspellings and broken links from your previous Siteimprove reports – it’s not too late to get started! If you would like a new report on either of those topics or if would like some help to tackle these issues, let us know.

This month’s new topic: Images missing ‘alt’ descriptions for accessibility

This month, we’re focusing on finding and fixing images that are missing ‘alt’ descriptions. In order to make the content accessible to users with disabilities, every image on your website should have an ‘alt’ description which concisely conveys the meaning of the image to users with visual impairments who are using assistive devices (like a screen reader).

Tomorrow, primary content editors will be receiving a Siteimprove report on all of your site’s images that are missing ‘alt’ descriptions that need to be fixed.

Help managing time-sensitive web content in T4

  • Do you have a difficult time remembering to update time-sensitive content on your Seattle U website?

You can add a "review date" to a content item, and TerminalFour will send you an email reminder on the date and time you've specified to remind you to review and update that specific content item. See the article in our “How To” section for more information.

  • Have you ever wanted to set a future date and time to publish or unpublish content?

See our How-To article on how to set a future publish date and/or expiration date for your website content.

Analytics reports from Siteimprove

Have you ever wanted to know more about the traffic on your website, such as how many visitors you’ve received, how visitors behave on your website, and what they’re looking for when they come to your pages?

If so, let the MarCom Web Team know, and we can send you an analytics report from Siteimprove.

Users who no longer need access to TerminalFour

Since it’s almost the end of the academic year, now is a great time to review who needs access to your section in T4. Perhaps you are, or have, a student employee who will be leaving at the end of the school year and will no longer need access to the CMS?

If you no longer need access to the CMS, please let us know and we can remove you from the system (and then you will stop receiving emails sent to the content editors listserv).

As always, let us know if you have any questions or concerns, and thanks again for everything you do to keep our websites up to date and looking great.

Jason Beardriel and Megan Otis

Monthly Website Improvement Topic: Image descriptions for accessibility

Posted by Megan Otis on April 17, 2018 at 1:04 PM PDT

Creating accessible web content is about making sure that all users can access and navigate your web content — including, and especially, users with disabilities. 

Beyond providing a good user experience for all users, Seattle U is required by law to meet minimum web accessibility standards; in practice, we strive to meet WCAG 2.0 AA standards.

Therefore, it is your responsibility as a content editor to work to ensure that your web content is as accessible as possible.

'Alt' Description for Images

Every image should have an 'alt' description; this short description is read aloud to users using assistive devices, such as a screen reader, and should convey the meaning of the image to someone who cannot see it. 

When you upload images to the Media Library, you should add an 'alt' description in the 'Description' field.

Screen shot showing where and how to add an 'alt' description to an image in the T4 Media Library

Alt descriptions must be concise. Some screen readers will stop reading the 'alt' description after 125 characters.

Try to stay away from images that include a lot of text in them. 

But if you choose to include images on your website which contain a lot of text on them, you must include an accessible text alternative. Options in TerminalFour include:

  • Adding the text to the 'alt' description,
  • Or (if the amount of text is too long to be contained within the alt description) typing out all of the text contained within the image directly on the page.

Using Siteimprove to find and fix images missing alt descriptions

This week, the MarCom Web Team will be sending out reports from Siteimprove to primary content editors for Seattle U websites listing all of the pages with images missing 'alt' descriptions on them.

Content editors will be able to take this report from Siteimprove and use it to locate images missing 'alt' descriptions, which can then be fixed in the TerminalFour content management system.

Content editors do not need a Siteimprove account in order to fix this or other issues that are identified by Siteimprove.

However, if you would like a Siteimprove account in order to delve more deeply into this and other issues of website quality, accessibility, and search engine optimization, request an account from the MarCom Web Team.

In summary

Every image should have an ‘alt’ description which concisely conveys the meaning of the image to a user with visual impairments.

  • Alt descriptions should be added to the image file in the Media Library
  • Alt descriptions should be 125 characters or less
  • Images should contain little-to-no text in them
  • If the image does contain text, there needs to be an accessible text equivalent (such as being included in the ‘alt’ description, and/or included elsewhere on the page) so that content is still accessible to users with visual impairments

Learn more about what else you can do in TerminalFour to make your website content more accessible.

Monthly website improvement topic: Broken Links

Posted by Megan Otis on April 6, 2018 at 1:04 PM PDT

Why is it important to fix broken links?

Broken links are bad for your website's accessibility and the experience of your users with disabilities. They can also be bad for your website's search engine optimization.

Broken links are also disappointing and frustrating for your users and they erode users' trust in your organization and credibility.

How to fix a broken link

Because of the negative impacts broken links have on your users, it's very important to find and fix them as quickly as possible. 

Staying on top of broken links that are pointing to external pages can be tricky, as you likely don’t have control over the external content you are linking to and you probably won't realize if/when that content has been removed or relocated on the external site.

When faced with a broken link, here are some things to think about:

  • Do you need it? What is the context?
    • If the content on the page makes sense without the link, or if you can easily revise the content so that it would make sense without the link, you may be able to just remove the broken link.
    • If the content on the page is entirely obsolete or extremely old, you could potentially just delete the entire content block, or the entire page, if necessary.
  • If you need it, use the link text, the URL, and the context to piece together what used to be there, where you were trying to link your users and for what purpose.
    • Then do a search to see if the content has been moved, or if an updated version has been published somewhere. Or just find a new, relevant source to keep your website content fresh.
    • If you need more information to help you fix the link, you can always check out old versions of a specific content item in TerminalFour by checking the history tab. Or you can check out old versions of the Seattle U website using the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.

Internal links

If you are linking to any web page within the Seattle U website, it's very important to use the TerminalFour internal linking tools (i.e. "insert section link" or "insert content link") whenever possible.

Why? When other Seattle U content editors make changes to their web pages that impact the URL of the page (for example, if they move or rename a section), if you have only copied and pasted the URL into your website (or used the "insert/edit external link" option), now your link is broken and you need to fix it.

But if you insert a "section link" or "content link," then when other content editors make edits that change the URL, TerminalFour will update those links for you, and you will spend less time fixing broken links.

Additionally, if other content editors try to delete something that someone has inserted a section or content link to, then TerminalFour will warn them that there are inbound links to those items before they can delete.

  • If you try to delete something and you receive a pop-up notification that another section contains a link to the item you are trying to delete, do not ignore the warning and delete it anyway.
  • Work with the MarCom Web Team and/or the content editors responsible for those other pages to remove those links and update the content on their pages before you delete your sections/content items.

So, the more we as a community of content editors use section and content links within TerminalFour, the more T4 can help us all prevent broken links.

Reporting broken links

As a user, when you encounter a broken link on the Seattle U website, report it. You can tell someone who works in the office/department that manages that web page, or tell the MarCom Web Team.

When you report a broken link, be sure to include what page you found the broken link on, and if possible, where (what URL) the broken link was linking to.

  • If you receive a 404 error when trying to access a Seattle U website, you will automatically be redirected to the Broken Link Report Form.
  • Submitting this form alerts the MarCom Web Team, but make sure to provide us with as much information as possible when answering the question, "How did you get to this page?" because if we can't find the broken link, we can't fix it.

Screenshot of the broken link report form

Using Siteimprove to find and fix broken links

This month, April 2018, the MarCom Web Team will be sending out reports from Siteimprove to primary content editors for Seattle U websites listing all of the pages with broken links on them.

Content editors will be able to take this report from Siteimprove and use it to locate pages with broken links, which can then be fixed in the TerminalFour content management system.

Content editors do not need a Siteimprove account in order to fix broken links and other issues that are identified by Siteimprove. However, if you would like a Siteimprove account in order to delve more deeply into this and other issues of website quality, accessibility, and search engine optimization, request an account from the MarCom Web Team.

Other useful tools to find broken links

  • Browser extensions or add-ins

Monthly Website Improvement Topic: Misspellings

Posted by Megan Otis on March 12, 2018 at 10:03 AM PDT

Why is it important to catch misspellings?

One of the most important jobs of a website is to establish trust and credibility with users, and one way of establishing that credibility is to write with excellent spelling and grammar. This is especially important for a university website. Frequent misspellings typos, especially on high-traffic pages, can increase users mistrust and doubt and can lead users to question an organization's expertise, authority.

Frequent misspellings can also negatively impact your website's search engine optimization and make it more difficult for new users to find you through a search engine, especially if your primary keywords are misspelled.

Tools to prevent misspellings

There are many tools out there to assist you in catching typos, misspellings and other grammar mistakes before they are published on your website.

  • Built-in Spell Check
    • TerminalFour has spell check built into its standard text editor. Before you hit "Save and Approve" you can hit the spell check button one of two ways: selecting "Spellcheck" under the Tools menu or clicking the button with the spell check icon.

Screenshot of how to access Spell Check in the text editor under the Tools menu

Screenshot of how to to access Spell Check in the text editor

  • Browser tools
    • Some web browsers, such as Chrome and Firefox, have free tools that can be added to the browser itself (called extensions or add-ons) that can check for spelling and grammar issues.
    • Recommended: Grammarly for Chrome, and Grammarly for Firefox

Using Siteimprove to find and fix misspellings

This month, March 2018, the MarCom Web Team will be sending out reports from Siteimprove to primary content editors for Seattle U websites listing all of the pages with misspellings on them.

Content editors will be able to take this report from Siteimprove and use it to locate pages with misspellings, which can then be fixed in the TerminalFour content management system.

Content editors do not need a Siteimprove account in order to fix misspellings and other issues that are identified by Siteimprove.

But if you would like a Siteimprove account in order to delve more deeply into this and other issues of website quality, accessibility, and search engine optimization, request an account from the MarCom Web Team.

March 2018 Updates

Posted by Megan Otis on March 9, 2018 at 11:03 AM PST

Greetings content editors:

We have a couple of announcements to share with you all.

New Resource: Searchable “How To” Articles

The TerminalFour Training “How To” articles have all been updated and converted to a searchable knowledge base. We will continue to add new articles to this section, but if there are any topics you would like to learn more about and are hoping to see added, let us know.

Monthly Website Improvement Topics

As previously announced, we have a short-term contract with Site Improve, a tool to identify content quality, accessibility and search engine optimization issues with our Seattle U websites.

Each month, we will be using Site Improve to focus on one issue that is negatively impacting our website, for example:

  • Misspellings
  • Broken links
  • Images over 1MB
  • Images missing ‘alt’ descriptions

We will send Site Improve reports to primary content editors for Seattle U websites listing all of the instances of that issue which need to be fixed. Then the MarCom Web Team will facilitate and support content editors in fixing these issues.

We hope by tackling smaller issues one at a time that this will make fixing these issues more manageable for everyone.

Who still needs access to TerminalFour?

Now is a great time to review the list of users who have permission to edit your websites.

  • If you no longer need access to the CMS, please let us know and we can remove you from the system (and then you will stop receiving these emails).

As always, if you have any questions let us know. And thank you for all you do to keep the Seattle U website up-to-date and looking great!

Jason Beardriel and Megan Otis

Follow-up to Design Refresh

Posted by Megan Otis on February 7, 2018 at 12:02 PM PST

Follow-up to the Design Refresh

If you missed your chance to attend a Design Refresh Demonstration and Training session, you can download the PowerPoint presentation on the Training Materials webpage.

The content type encyclopedia has now been fully updated to reflect the changes made during the Design Refresh. There you’ll find all of the content types available to you, what they look like, and how to use them. Including:

Additionally, we are happy to announce that the following new content types are ready for use:

And by popular demand, you can now customize the color of the triangles in your Megabanners and Title banners!

New contract with Site Improve

Seattle U has a new contract with Site Improve, a tool to identify content quality, accessibility and search engine optimization issues with our Seattle U websites. The MarCom Web Team will soon be making this tool available to interested content editors, so stay tuned for more information.

If you would like to receive reports from Site Improve, or if you are interested in receiving access, please let us know.

Preview your webpage with the new look

Posted by Megan Otis on December 5, 2017 at 4:12 PM PST

We wanted to share some more updates about next week’s launch of the design refresh and template changes.

Launch Details

Next week, we will be rolling out the design refresh and template changes mid-week. In order for us to make all of the necessary changes to the templates for the launch, all publishing will be suspended beginning at 9am on Mon, Dec 11 through the launch. Publishing will return no later than end of day Wednesday, Dec 13. (Though if something comes up during that time period that urgently needs to be published, please let us know.)

During the downtime, you will still be able to log into the CMS, and save & approve changes to your website, but changes will not go live until we launch the design refresh.

Preview Your Page With the New Look

While the Web Team is still making small adjustments to the templates and design, we are pleased to be able to offer you a preview so that you can have a sense of what your pages will look like after we launch the design refresh and template changes next week. Here are the steps:

Before you can correctly preview your pages with the new design, first you will need to confirm that the page layout settings are correct.

  • In the Site Structure, click the name of your top level folder, then click over to the “Page Layouts” tab.
  • In the row labeled v9 Preview, make sure that the page layout that is selected is the V9 version of whatever page layout is showing in the SU Website row. So if it says “Home page” in the SU Website row, make sure you select “V9 – Home page.” If it says “Standard subpage” for SU Website, then select “V9 – Standard Subpage” in the v9 Preview row.

Screen shot of how to change your page layout settings to enable the v9 Preview

  • Be sure to hit "Save changes" at the bottom right of the page before you proceed.
  • Then in the Site Structure, next to the name of your top level folder, click Actions > Preview section.

Screen shot of how to preview your page or section

  • Don’t forget, you need to have your pop-up blocker disabled in your browser before you will be able to preview your page.
  • When TerminalFour asks you to select a channel to preview then you should click “v9 Preview.”

Screen shot of how to select the v9 Preview Channel

  • If, when you hit Actions > Preview, T4 does not give you the option to select the v9 preview channel, please let Megan know and we will adjust your user settings.
  • Right now, your page will default to a "fixed-width" but with the new template changes, you now have the option of going full-width. If you would like to see what your page would look like full-width, you can go to your Section Customizations folder, open your "Site configuration" content item, and select "full width."
  • If you have any comments or concerns about the new design, please reach out to us.

Fixed width or Full width

When we roll out the design refresh and template changes, you will now have the option of keeping your website content at a fixed width (1170 pixels wide), or opting to convert your pages to full width.

Fixed width page:

Screen shot of what fixed width webpage looks like

Full width page:

Screen shot of what a full width webpage looks like

In your "Section Customizations" folder, you should find a "Site Configuration Options" content type, and within that content item, you can easily select between a fixed width or full width style for all of your pages.

Screen shot of Site Configuration content type with fixed width or full width option

If you decide to convert your pages to full width, you may find that some of your older images will need to be replaced with higher resolution images in order to look good on larger or wider screen sizes.

If you have any questions about converting your pages to full-width, please let us know.

Demonstration and Training Session

We will be providing a Demonstration and Training session to showcase the website design refresh, and show you some of the cool new things you can do in T4 with the new content types and template changes we’re rolling out next week.

We currently have one demo scheduled for Tue, Dec 12, from 2:00-3:00pm, in PIGT 304. If demand is high, we may schedule another session in January when we all return from winter break. Let us know if you’d like to attend a demonstration and training session.

Grad Viewbook and Design Refresh Launch Update

Posted by Megan Otis on November 17, 2017 at 10:11 AM PST

Happy Friday content editors:

Two pieces of news to share with you this morning.

New Graduate Viewbook

Today, we have launched the new digital Grad Viewbook. The new viewbook is the result of collaboration between Graduate Admissions, Marketing Communications and our branding agency 160over90.

Launch Update

To ensure we are able to focus on any potential issues that may arise, we are shifting the launch of the design refresh and template changes, along with the launch of the new Seattle U homepage, until after finals week in December to minimize impact on the campus community.

We are still temporarily pausing publishing this afternoon, as an opportunity for the Web Team to do a dry run for the design refresh launch in a couple of weeks. But publishing will resume by 5:00pm this evening.

Thank you all so much for your patience and understanding.

Have a great weekend,

The MarCom Web Team