Learning Outcomes

Undergraduate – Computer Science Program Learning Outcomes
  1. An ability to analyze problems, and to identify and define the requirements in the context of the discipline appropriate to their solutions.
  2. An ability to design, implement, and evaluate computer-based solutions to meet a given set of requirements.
  3. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences about technical information.
  4. An ability to make informed judgments in computing practice based on legal, ethical, and social considerations.
  5. An ability to function effectively on teams to establish goals, plan tasks, meet deadlines, manage risk, and produce deliverables.
  6. An ability to apply theory in the design, implementation, and evaluation of computer-based solutions.
  7. An ability to reason about and explain computer-based solutions at multiple levels of abstraction.
  8. An ability to learn new techniques and tools to adapt to the rapidly changing field of computing.
Graduate – Certificate in Computer Science Fundamentals Program Learning Outcomes
  1. An ability to analyze problems, and to identify and define the requirements in the context of the discipline appropriate to their solutions.
  2. An ability to design, implement, and evaluate computer-based solutions to meet a given set of requirements.
  3. An ability to apply theory in the design, implementation, and evaluation of computer-based solutions.
  4. An ability to reason about and explain computer-based solutions at multiple levels of abstraction.
  5. An ability to learn new techniques and tools to adapt to the rapidly changing field of computing.
Graduate – MS in Computer Science Program Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of core areas and advanced topics in computer science.
  2. An ability to design, implement, and evaluate computer-based solutions to meet a given set of requirements.
  3. An ability to effectively communicate technical concepts in written and oral form.
  4. An ability to make informed judgments in computing practice based on legal, ethical, and social considerations.
  5. An ability to understand computer science literature to maintain professional currency.