Upcoming Classes

Fall 2022

Download a copy of the English Course Grid (PDF)

ENGL 2010-01 Encountering British Literature: Pre-Modern/Post-Human

MWF 12:30-1:55 p.m.

Kate Koppelman

This class investigates the category of “the human” from a post-humanist perspective and locates the site of that investigation in Early and Middle English texts and contexts. An investigation of pre-modern notions of the category of the human will show that humanity was understood as having complicated and often intimate associations with (enmeshments, hybrid embodiments) the non-human (animals, manifestations of the divine, or even nature itself as understood through humoral theories). Thus, notions of the post-human read through the pre-modern world ask us to look at the pre-modern world for the ways in which it shows humanity to be complicated and ensnared in the lives of animals, mythic creatures, and the material world. All the texts we read figure the category of the human differently—and often inconsistently. Our work will not be to come up with a secure and agreed-upon definition of the human (for the period or for our current moment), but rather to understand that the use of such a category at all marks and, often, serves to further marginalize beings whose bodies occupy zones of uncertainty or hybridity—figured variously through the filters of gender, race, sexuality, and religion. Please be aware that our readings will ask us to grapple with difficult topics: disability, xenophobia and racism, misogyny and sexual violence, homo- and trans-phobia. I will always indicate upcoming topics that may be triggering.

ENGL 2030-01 Encountering Intercultural Literature: Imagined Futures

MWF 2:05-3:30 p.m.

Hannah Tracy

In this course, we will read and discuss a variety of literary texts that imagine, construct, and engage critically with the future. We will consider how visions of the future created by white, straight, cisgender writers have been privileged in literary canon formation and then focus our efforts on reading and discussing how writers from historically marginalized groups have engaged with the concept of the future. Afro/Africanfuturisms, Indigenous futurisms, and queer futurisms will be our primary focus this quarter, but we will also consider texts that blur boundaries between these categories and defy categorization.

ENGL 3010-01 Literature to 1500 Context and Theory: Chaucer

MW 3:40-5:45 p.m.

Katherine Koppelman

Pre-1800, INT, CT; x-WGST

This course will introduce you to some of the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. It is an intensive class in that you will be asked to very quickly familiarize yourself with reading Middle English, while also producing subtle and well-crafted responses to the various themes presented to you throughout his poetry. The class asks that you work to be engaged not only in understanding Middle English, but also in investigating how Chaucer’s poetry resonates with cultural, political, and social events from his own time and from ours. This last point, in particular, will be of continued importance to us this quarter, as reading Chaucer’s poem NOW, in a world sometimes literally in flames, asks us to make connections that may alternatively be surprising or disturbing. As an advance warning: Chaucer’s poem takes on themes of sexual violence, religious and racial intolerance, the lived experience of the refugee, the tendency of patriarchy to suppress and oppress, the responses of the ruling “class” to revolt, the blind and deathly rage of a pandemic, and the equally blind response of monetary greed to the effects of the plague.

ENGL 3010-01 Literature to 1500 Context and Theory: Chaucer

MW 3:40-5:45 p.m.

Katherine Koppelman

Pre-1800, INT, CT; x-WGST

This course will introduce you to some of the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. It is an intensive class in that you will be asked to very quickly familiarize yourself with reading Middle English, while also producing subtle and well-crafted responses to the various themes presented to you throughout his poetry. The class asks that you work to be engaged not only in understanding Middle English, but also in investigating how Chaucer’s poetry resonates with cultural, political, and social events from his own time and from ours. This last point, in particular, will be of continued importance to us this quarter, as reading Chaucer’s poem NOW, in a world sometimes literally in flames, asks us to make connections that may alternatively be surprising or disturbing. As an advance warning: Chaucer’s poem takes on themes of sexual violence, religious and racial intolerance, the lived experience of the refugee, the tendency of patriarchy to suppress and oppress, the responses of the ruling “class” to revolt, the blind and deathly rage of a pandemic, and the equally blind response of monetary greed to the effects of the plague.

ENGL 3130-01 Writing Fiction: Hypoxic Short Fiction

MWF 2:05-3:30 p.m.

Juan Reyes

FIC/FORMS, INT

In this class, we will fix our lens on production, taking inspiration from athletic interval training: a full sprint (writing short fiction) and then a breath by jogging (writing flash fiction), always writing new material and learning how to rest while remaining active in our craft.

ENGL 3150-01 Writing Lyric Poetry

MWF 2:05-3:30 p.m.

Claudia Castro Luna

CWP, FORMS

Practiced for at least 4,500 years the lyric poem is as ancient as recorded literature, its enduring appeal driven by the way in which it “immerses us in the original waters of consciousness” as Edward Hirsch notes. In this class we will look at the way contemporary poets are reimagining the lyric poem using its capacity for interiority and taking advantage of experimental techniques to explore intersectionality.

The goals of this course are to gain an appreciation for the way in which the lyric poem has evolved over time holding steadfast to its drive/impulse to explore the inner life of the poet. We will read samples of traditional lyric poems as well as contemporary poets writing lyric from a variety of perspectives. We will examine elements of craft (line, rhyme, figurative language, image, metaphor, sound) to understand poets’ intent and to hone our own poetry writing skills. We write in class and away from class as well as keep a poetry notebook. We will workshop poems once a week and through this practice discover the craft behind the writing. No prior knowledge of poetry is necessary for this course and no prior poetry writing experience is necessary.

ENGL 3450-01 Irish Literature

TTH 3:45-5:50 p.m.

Sean McDowell

1800-Present

Irish literature is one of the richest literatures in the world. The nation of Ireland is two-and-a- half times smaller than Washington state, and its population about one-and-a-half million people fewer. Yet four Irish writers (W. B. Yeats, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett, and Seamus Heaney) have won the Nobel Prize for Literature, and their number does not include James Joyce, author of Ulysses, which the Modern Library rated as the best novel so far written. (Joyce’s The Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is number three on this same list.) This class provides an immersion into Irish literature from the so-called Celtic Revival, through the 1916 Easter Rising, the Irish War of Independence, the Irish Civil War, and the Troubles, to the death of Heaney in 2013. Readings will feature the poetry of Yeats, Eavan Boland, Heaney, Michael Longley, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Michael Hartnett, and Paula Meehan; Joyce’s The Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; and the plays of Yeats, Lady Augusta Gregory, J. M. Synge, Samuel Beckett, and Brian Friel, along with a few other writers who have cast light on what distinguishes this literature from other Anglophone literatures.

ENGL 3910-01 Modern Short Novel

TTH 8-10:05 a.m.

Edwin Weihe

1800-Present

The short novel falls somewhat loosely between the short story and the novel, both in terms of its length and its effects. Like a three-hour movie, it poses special challenges for both the maker and the audience (as well as producers/publishers). In this course we will be interested in how these challenges are met, how the short novel artfully negotiates between the primarily spatial medium of the short story and the temporal/historical medium of the novel. Short novels under consideration for this course include James’ The Aspern Papers, Joyce’s The Dead, Camus’ The Stranger, Rhys’ The Wide Sargasso Sea, O’Connor’s The Displaced Person, Lessing’s The Fifth Child, Cisneros’ The House on Mango Street, Bellow’s Seize the Day, Roth’s Goodbye Columbus, DeLillo’s Pafko at the Wall: a Novella.

ENGL 3910-02 Edit/Publish an Online Journal (SUURJ)

TTH 1:30-3:35 p.m.

Tara Roth

WRST

In this course we will learn the foundations of editing and publishing an online research journal, as we prepare to publish an issue of Seattle University’s Undergraduate Research Journal (SUURJ). The course will focus on the tools, methods, and philosophies of good editing, and will emphasize peer review and editing as a skill-building process. During this class we will learn about and practice various modes and methods of editing. We’ll learn how to edit scholarly works, explore editing in diverse disciplines, and practice selecting good writing across the disciplines. We’ll learn about publishing and copyright codes and laws. We’ll work together to design and set up the journal’s website. For our final project we will collaborate with the SUURJ Faculty Advisory Board to engage in peer review to select the articles for publication in the spring issue of SUURJ. Students should bring to the class a strength in writing and language, and a strong interest in editing and publishing, but need not have had prior editing experience.

You must take this course to be eligible for the 2- and 3-credit practicum courses in winter and spring terms that will see the issue through to publication.

ENGL 3910-03 Writing Self, Society, Story

TTH 1:30-3:35 p.m.

Susan Meyers

CWN, WRST, HYBRID, INT

“Through story we as humans make attempts, several times a day, to connect with one another. Through story we convince ourselves that our experiences of the world are not nearly as different as they appear.” Anthony Doerr

What’s your story—and how does it fit into our broader world? Whether in creative expression or academic study, writers use a shared set of tools to gather, analyze, and craft social and cultural information. In this class, we will study strategies of field research and writing that are common to genres ranging from ethnography to journalism to creative nonfiction. Throughout this work, we will employ surveys, interviews, and observations in order to learn more about the world we live in—and how authors can promote positive changes within it. Students will have the opportunity for hands-on research and writing, as well as careful consideration of the methods and expectations involved in field research. Readings for the course will include selections from literature, longform journalism, and cultural studies. Written outcomes will include expressive exercises, methodological tools, and a sustained field project. Whether you want to use your writing skills for art, research, advocacy—or a bit of all three!—this course will help you deepen your practice and prepare you for an active writing life in and beyond your college years.

ENGL 4730-01 Postcolonial Literature

TTH 10:15 a.m.-12:20 p.m.

Nalini Iyer

1800-Present, INT; x-WGST

In the late 1970s, many literary scholars began a critical engagement with the discourses of colonialism, imperialism, decolonization, and nationalism. This approach to literary discourse soon broadened to include other areas of cultural production and is referred to as “postcolonial studies.” In this course, we will examine postcolonial cultural theory from a variety of theorists, engage with the debates within postcolonial studies, and explore the relationship between postcolonial studies and globalization. Drawing on literary and theoretical texts from across the globe, this course offers you an introduction into some of the major questions that shape this field. These questions include: how do we define postcolonial literatures? What is the impact of postcolonial theory beyond literary studies? What is the difference between postcolonial and decolonial approaches? What is a nation and how do postcolonial nations define citizenship, minority rights, belonging? What is the relationship between postcoloniality and globalization? Is postcolonial studies dead? Do women experience colonialism and decolonization differently from men? How do gender and sexuality studies intersect with postcolonial studies? Some theorists we will read include Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, Gayatri Spivak, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Robert J.C. Young. Literary texts may include works by Amitav Ghosh, Jean Rhys, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Buchi Emecheta, Bapsi Sidhwa and others.