Faculty Writing Groups

Faculty “Writing” Groups (FWGs) provide you with structure and support to make steady progress toward your individual research and scholarship goals.

  • If you’re ready to connect with a group, you can use this short online form to express an interest, and we’ll connect you with colleagues across campus once we have a viable group size (typically 3–4 people).
  • If you’re not sure about joining a group, then read on, and we’ll explain our expansive definition of “writing,” as well as why we encourage you to try these groups out for yourself.

Faculty "Writing" Groups are co-sponsored by the Center for Faculty Development and the Office of Sponsored Projects.

What do we mean by "writing?"

According to Rockquemore, writing is “[a]ny project between conceiving of an idea to manuscript out the door” (NCFDD, n.d).  We know that a “manuscript might not be the evidence of scholarship that’s right for your discipline, and therefore, for our purposes

“Writing” encapsulates whatever is involved from the inception of your idea to the completion of the final “product.”

Why join a Faculty "Writing" Group

How to join a group

Starting Fall 2022, we will set up groups on an on-demand basis. Sign up to join a group using this short online form, and once we have enough people to form a viable group (typically 3–4 people, all from different disciplines), we’ll be in touch to offer a time to meet with you all and get you started.

Background and references

After a long dry spell because of increased administrative duties, the Writing Group helped me stick to a writing plan and complete a manuscript within a quarter. I don't remember ever being so productive. Writing groups really help keep you focused.

Associate Dean Seattle University

The writing group has had an amazing impact on my scholarship. I have submitted a book manuscript (just submitted the final manuscript), had an article published, and started a new project this summer. The group has been a safe and supportive space to discuss the challenges of finding time for writing as well as navigating the tenure clock.

Assistant Professor Seattle University

Helped me stay focused, organized, and become more productive. Having people to whom I am regularly accountable for scholarship was great. It was also wonderful to have encouragement for my work and people with whom to celebrate my successes!

Associate Professor Seattle University

Without those gentle external nudges, it would be too easy to let all of my other work take priority.

Program Director Seattle University