MACJ Student Handbook

PDF Version Available here

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1)  Welcome to the MACJ Program
2)  Program Mission
3)  Program Overview
4)  Choosing a Specialization Area
5)  Choosing the Comprehensive Exam v. Thesis Option
6)  Selecting your Faculty Advisor, Thesis Chair, and Thesis Committee
7)  Program Degree Requirements
  • MACJ – No Specialization (MACJ)
  • MACJ – Criminal Justice Research & Evaluation (CJRE)
  • MACJ – Investigative Criminology (CJIC)
  • MACJ – Victimology (CJVI)
  • MACJ/JD – (MACJ/JD)
8)  Course Descriptions
9)  Internships
10) Teaching and Research Assistantships
11) Attending Professional Conferences
12) Expectations of Student Conduct
13) Academic Performance
14) Enrollment Status
15) University Resources
16) MACJ Faculty and Staff
17)  CJ Department Advisory Committee 

1) WELCOME TO THE MACJ PROGAM!

Criminal Justice is an interdisciplinary social science involving the study of crime and societal responses to it. Criminal Justice is a broad and fascinating field of study encompassing the study of criminal behavior, the administration and management of justice, policy and practice in policing, courts, and corrections, victimology and victim services, juvenile justice, crime prevention, and public safety and security. The Master of Arts in Criminal Justice program, founded in 2006, provides students with the opportunity for advanced intensive study of crime and justice issues with emphasis on the application of theory and research to criminal justice policy and practice. The MACJ program is designed to meet the needs of students who are preparing for careers in criminal justice, for students who already have careers in the criminal justice field and desire the advancement of their knowledge and skills, and for students who plan to pursue doctoral work.  

Criminal Justice is an academic discipline that enjoys a high job placement rate and criminal Justice graduates at the undergraduate and graduate levels pursue many career routes. While many positions in the criminal justice system require the BA degree or in some cases a high school diploma, increasingly positions in today’s competitive job market require the Master’s degree and/or provide salary increases commensurate with education level. Students who complete the MA degree in criminal justice generally seek careers in law enforcement, private security, community and institutional corrections, court services, victim services, social services, academia, and/or investigation in a range of public and private agencies. We are proud to say that past graduates of our undergraduate program include law enforcement officers, corrections officers, community corrections officers, offender transition counselors, public defenders, prosecuting attorneys, private security supervisors, forensic scientists and technicians, medico-legal death investigators, victim advocates, juvenile detention and probation officers, and others who are making important contributions to the field of criminal justice. We expect that graduates of our Master’s program will be equally successful in obtaining positions and developing their careers in the criminal justice system. MACJ graduates will be additionally prepared at the more advanced level for positions that require the MA degree such as teaching positions in community colleges or as university-level adjunct faculty, research analyst positions in criminal justice agencies, and positions in law enforcement and corrections at the federal level that require the advanced degree.

2) Program MISSION

The mission of the criminal justice department is to produce graduates who approach their roles in the criminal justice field with knowledge, empiricism, innovation, humanism, and with a deep concern for justice issues faced by offenders, victims, citizens, and governmental and private agents affected by and charged with responding to crime. We hope to instill in students a responsibility to integrate and evaluate conceptual and empirical contributions to the field of criminal justice. MACJ graduates are prepared for positions and advancement as practitioners, administrators, victim advocates, and/or research analysts in law enforcement, courts, corrections, social service, and research agencies at the private, county, state, and federal levels. The MACJ program provides foundation for understanding organizational relations in criminal justice, the ability to critically analyze and evaluate criminal justice policy and practice, and the necessary skills to conduct methodologically sound research in specialized areas in criminology and criminal justice. The program is designed to accommodate professionals in the criminal justice field who desire graduate education for advancement purposes as well as students entering upon completion of their bachelor’s degree who seek advanced education in criminal justice prior to seeking employment in the criminal justice field and/or as preparation for Ph.D.-level studies. The specific objectives of the criminal justice master’s program are to:

  • Develop in students the knowledge, insight, critical thinking skills, values and ethical consciousness essential to becoming responsible practitioners, researchers, and leaders in criminal justice.
  • Provide comprehensive, rigorous, analytic, focused study of crime and justice issues with emphasis on the application of theory and research in criminal justice to criminal justice initiatives, policies, and practices.
  • Provide a strong foundation in criminology, research methods, statistics, organizational theory, criminal justice ethics, issues of diversity in criminal justice, and broad-based analysis of the criminal justice system with focus on law enforcement, the adjudication process, and corrections.
  • Prepare students for positions and advancement in law enforcement, courts, corrections, social service, and research agencies in private, county, state, and federal agencies.

The MACJ Program focuses on cultivating knowledge in the areas of police, courts, corrections, ethics, and contemporary issues in criminal justice. Emphasis is also placed on advancing the research skills of students so that they are capable of both understanding existing literature and executing research on their own. A unique component of Seattle University’s MACJ Program is that students have the option of designating a specialization area in one of the following content areas:  Criminal Justice Research & Evaluation, Investigative Criminology, and Victimology. The specialization areas provide specialized coursework in the application of criminology and criminal justice theory to key areas of criminal justice research and practice. The specialization areas are designed to prepare students for career-routes respectively in research, investigation, and victim services and/or to provide focused exposure to subfields within the discipline of criminal justice. 

3) PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The MACJ Program is designed to be completed in two years or less with full-time enrollment (6-9 credits per quarter, including summers). The MACJ curriculum consists of 55 Credits: 18 3-credit courses and one 1-credit course. Students are required to take ten foundation courses (28 credits) and nine elective courses (27 credits), four of which (12 credits) can be selected as concentration area courses. The foundation courses are:

CRJS 5010 Criminal Justice Theory (3)
CRJS 5020 Advanced Criminological Theory (3)
CRJS 5030 Law & Social Control (3)
CRJS 5040 Organizational Theory and Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5050 Criminal Justice Ethics and Decision Making (3)
CRJS 5060 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5070 Statistical Analysis (3)
CRJS 5080 Statistics Lab (1)
CRJS 5100 Theory and Research in Policing, Courts, Corrections (3)
CRJS 5900 Criminal Justice Capstone Seminar (3)

Students who work full-time and/or have other obligations may prefer to complete the program on a part-time basis over a longer time period. Students are welcome to complete the program on a part-time basis over a three or four-year period or longer. During the first year of the two-year program, students generally take required foundation courses. After the completion of the first year, students take a capstone course in the summer quarter to prepare for the comprehensive exam and/or thesis. Students who plan to complete the degree over a three year period may choose to split up the foundation courses over a two-year period. The comprehensive exam covers content from the foundation courses. The program offers a broad range of elective courses as well as internship and research and teaching assistantship opportunities. The elective courses include:

(Note: Several of the elective courses – designated with an asterisk - are jointly offered as undergraduate/graduate courses. Students are permitted to take up to 6 credits of the jointly offered undergrad/grad electives)

CRJS 5110 Criminal Justice Legislation and Policy (3)
CRJS 5120 Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5130 Critical Criminology (3)
CRJS 5140 Investigative Criminology and Offender Profiling (3)
CRJS 5150 Typologies of Crime and Criminal Behavior (3)
CRJS 5160 Theories and Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation (3)
CRJS 5170 Crime Analysis (3)
CRJS 5180 Contemporary Issues in Victimology (3)
CRJS 5190 Violence and Victimization (3)
CRJS 5200 Restorative/Community Justice (3)
CRJS 5220 Issues in Contemporary Law Enforcement (3)*
CRJS 5230 Punishment & Social Theory (3)*
CRJS 5240 Crime Mapping (3)
CRJS 5250 Data and Intelligence Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5260 Terrorism and Homeland Security (3)*
CRJS 5500  The Psychopath (3)*
CRJS 5550  ATF Practicum (1)
CRJS 5560  Forensics Practicum (1)
CRJS 5570  Trial Skills Practicum (1)
CRJS 5580  FBI Practicum (1)
CRJS 5600  Forensic Anthropology (3)*
CRJS 5650  Crime Scene & Medico-legal Death Investigation (3)*
 
CRJS 5530 U.S. Marshals Service Practicum (1)
CRJS 5540 DEA Practicum (1)
CRJS 5550 ATF Practicum (1)
CRJS 5560 Forensics Practicum (1)
CRJS 5570 Trial Skills Practicum (1)
CRJS 5580  FBI Practicum (1)
CRJS 5700 Restorative Justice: Behind Bars (3)
CRJS 5810  Murder, Movies, and Copycat Crimes (3)*
CRJS 5910-5930 Special Topics Seminar (1-3)
CRJS 5950 Internship (3)
CRJS 5960 Independent Study (3)
CRJS 5970 Teaching Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5980 Research Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5990 Thesis (1-3)
COUN 5100 Fundamental Counseling Skills (3)
COUN 5110 Counseling Theories (3)
COUN 5130 Counseling Diverse Populations (3)
PUBM 5310 Public Budgeting (3)
PUBM 5720 Administrative Law (3)

In the second year of the program, students concentrate on general MACJ elective courses, courses in one of three specialization areas (i.e., Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation, Investigative Criminology, Victimology), and begin working on a thesis if this option is selected. The “typical” schedule is as follows:

 

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

SUMMER

Year 1

CRJS 5010 (3)/ Criminal Justice Theory

CRJS 5030 (3)/Law & Social Control

 

CRJS 5100 (3)/Theory & Research in Police, Courts, Corrections

CRJS 5900 (3)/CJ Capstone

 

CRJS 5020 (3)/Advanced Criminological Theory

 

CRJS 5040 (3)/Organizational Theory & Analysis in CJ

CRJS 5070 (3)/Statistical Analysis

CRJS 505 0(3)/CJ Ethics & Decision Making

 

 

CRJS Elective (1-3) (Optional)

CRJS 5060 (3)/Research Methods

 

CRJS 5080 (1)/Statistics Lab

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3) (Optional)

 

 

 

CRJS Elective (3) (Optional)

 

 

 

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

SUMMER

Year 2

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3)

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3)

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3)

CRJS 5900 (3)/CJ Capstone

(if opt to take comp exam at end of year 2)

 

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3)

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3)

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3)

 

 

 

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3)

OR

Thesis Option (1-3)

 

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3)

OR

Thesis Option (1-3)

CRJS Elective or Specialization (3)

OR

Thesis Option (1-3)

 


The MACJ program without an optional specialization can be completed in 1 ½ years or 6 quarters taking 9-10 credits per quarter. The MACJ program with a specialization can be completed in 2 years or 8 quarters taking 3-9 credits per quarter (with most quarters 6-9 credits). Students may choose to complete an internship and/or teaching or research assistantship for 1-3 credits to fulfill some of the elective requirements. See Appendix A for the 1-Year Course Schedule for 2014-2015.

4) Choosing an optional Specialization area

Beyond the foundation courses, students must take 27 elective credits. Of these, 12 credits of designated courses may be selected as one of three optional specialization areas:

  • Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation
  • Investigative Criminology
  • Victimology

Students may select a specialization area or choose not to concentrate. You are not required to select a specialization area. The advantage of not choosing a specialization is flexibility in selecting elective credits. The advantage of concentrating in a particular area is that a set of courses will be required and identified on your transcript and diploma as an official specialization. This may stand out to employers who seek expertise in a specific area (e.g., a victimology specialization may be an asset in applying for positions in victim services, research and evaluation for research analyst positions, and investigative criminology for investigative positions) or to graduate admissions and selection committee for Ph.D. programs.

A few tips/factors to think about in determining whether or not to concentrate:

Choose the MACJ with no specialization if:

    • If you want flexibility in your schedule and the freedom to choose an individualized set of elective courses.
    • You want to take your time completing the program over 3 or 4 years and don’t want to be tied to successive course offerings (i.e., taking a series of courses in a 4 quarter block).
    • You want both flexibility and a traditional criminal justice master’s degree.
    • You would like to pursue research at the Ph.D.-level but are unsure at this point what specific area of criminal justice you would like to focus on.

Choose the MACJ with Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation specialization if:

    • You seek a career as a research analyst for a criminal justice agency
    • You want to be sure to take elective courses that offer you well-rounded background in quantitative and qualitative research methods and comprehensive exposure to key areas of criminal justice research.
    • You want to highlight your expertise in quantitative and qualitative research methodology for potential employers or in your current position.
    • You would like to pursue research at the Ph.D.-level and want to highlight your coursework in research and evaluation.

Choose the MACJ with Investigative Criminology specialization if:

    • You seek a career as an investigator in federal, state, county, or local criminal justice-related or private agency.
    • You want to enhance your knowledge of the application of criminological theory to investigative practice and to develop investigative skills and expertise.
    • You currently hold an investigative position and want to better understand the theoretical underpinnings of investigative practice and gain knowledge of key research findings in the area of offender profiling, crime scene investigation, and investigative practice.
    • You would like to pursue research at the Ph.D.-level in the area of offender profiling, criminal investigation, and/or forensic psychology.

Choose the MACJ with Victimology specialization if:

    • You seek a career in victim advocacy/victim services.
    • You believe that traditional criminal justice education does not sufficiently focus on victims and victimology and want your MACJ degree to include coursework specifically devoted to research, theory, and issues focused on victims of crime.
    • You currently work with victims of crime and want to enhance your knowledge of theory and research in victimology and victimization and take coursework that will enhance your skills as a victim advocate.
    • You would like to pursue research at the Ph.D.-level that focuses on Victimology, violence and victimization, and/or restorative/community justice.

If you are unsure whether or not you would like to concentrate in a particular area, the best approach is to look at what your schedule will look like if you select the specialization and which courses you will be required to take. Keep in mind that you can select a specialization and/or change your mind at any time prior to your last quarter (although changing or adding a specialization area late in the program may affect your date of completion). To change or select a specialization, contact the CJ Graduate Director and/or your faculty advisor.

5) CHOOSING THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAM OR THESIS OPTION

All MACJ students are required to either pass a comprehensive examination or complete a thesis. Students wishing to pursue the thesis option must obtain approval from the Graduate Director by submitting a thesis proposal and identifying a thesis chair and committee.

Here are a few tips/factors to consider when deciding which option to choose.

Choose the comprehensive exam if:

    • You are interested in gaining a broader understanding of various criminal justice topics and issues.
    • You are interested in completing your degree in a faster fashion.
    • You have no desire to pursue a Ph.D. degree or conduct research either on your own or in your profession.
    • The completion of a thesis will have no bearing on advancement or promotion in your profession.

Choose the thesis if:

    • You are interested in specializing in one research area of criminal justice.
    • You are interested in conducting and analyzing research.
    • You have solid skills in methods and statistics and want to apply them.
    • You plan to enter a Ph.D. program upon graduation.
    • You plan to obtain a job as a research analyst.
    • You plan to continue to conduct research after graduation.

Comprehensive Examination Requirements

The comprehensive exam covers content areas encompassed by the foundation courses in the MACJ curriculum and readings included in the comprehensive reading list. Much of the required reading for the foundation courses is included on the comprehensive reading list. The list also includes additional classic and recent key texts and research articles in criminology and criminal justice beyond what is required or recommended for the foundation courses. See Appendix B for MACJ Comprehensive Reading List.

The comprehensive exam may be taken as soon as the foundation courses and comprehensive exam readings are completed and must be taken within 1 year of completing all foundation courses during the department designated (fall or spring) examination periods. Students must register to take the comprehensive examination during one of the two sessions offered during the year at least two weeks prior to the exam.  The exam must be completed prior to the last quarter of the program.  The three components of the comprehensive examination that students will be tested on are as follows:

  1. Criminal Justice
  2. Criminology
  3. Research Methods and Statistics in Criminology and Criminal Justice

A student will have a choice of answering 1 of 2 questions proposed for each section. The comprehensive exam is offered twice per year during Fall and Spring quarters and will last 6 hours. The exam is graded as follows:

EP: Exceptional Pass
P: Pass
MP: Marginal Pass
F: Fail

Once a student is registered for the comprehensive exam, he/she must take the exam on the date registered for. Students may cancel their registration no later than two weeks prior to the exam date. No additional cancellations after the time frame will be accepted unless documentation of an extreme circumstance is provided.  If a student fails to sit for the comprehensive exam at the required time or does not cancel in the required timeframe, it will automatically count as a failed exam attempt. 

A student may retake the comprehensive exam once. Students retaking the examination will be required to answer questions only in areas not passed in the first exam. A student may retake the comprehensive exam once. Students retaking the exam will be required to answer questions only in areas not passed in the first exam.  If the student fails a second attempt, the student can petition to the Graduate Director for a third chance.  When a student petitions for a third, and final, attempt, the Graduate Director will assemble a committee to determine if a third attempt will be permitted.  Factors that will contribute to the committee’s decision include, but are not limited to, GPA and the performance on previous exams.  The committee decision is final.  Students will not be allowed to apply for subsequent attempts or to switch over to thesis tract.  If the student fails a third attempt, the student will be dismissed from the program.

If a student has a documented disability, he/she may be able to receive additional time for taking the comp exam.  The student must make a formal written request to the Graduate Director requesting more time on the written comp exam.  Documentation from Seattle University Disabilities Services is required to be considered for this option.  It is at the Graduate Director’s discretion as to the decision.

Appeal Policy Note: The MACJ Comp Exam is graded by a committee of three faculty members and results are final.  If a student feels that an error has been made in the grading of the results, he/she must first notify the Graduate Director and meet to discuss the grading of the particular section in question with both the Graduate Director and a faculty representative who is a subject matter expert in that area within two week of the comp exam results being issued.  After meeting with both the Graduate Director and faculty expert, the student may write a formal memo outlining why he/she believes the answer was graded incorrectly and provide a rationale for another grading outcome. This memo is due to the Graduate Director two weeks after the meeting with the Graduate Director and faculty expert.  Upon receipt of the memo, the Graduate Director will assemble an appeal committee of three faculty members who will review the memo and exam answers in question.  The Graduate Director will provide the student with the results of the committee decision within 30 days.  The appealed decision from the committee is final and cannot be further appealed.

Thesis Requirements

Students planning to go on to a PhD program or who are interested in completing an independent research project may select the thesis option in lieu of completing the comprehensive exam. Students wishing to pursue this option must apply to do so to the Graduate Director.  The Graduate Director will assemble a thesis selection committee to determine whether the student will be granted permission to pursue the thesis.  Students may apply for consideration of the thesis option after completing 12 credits of coursework in the MACJ program.  In order to be eligible to apply for the thesis option, students must have completed a minimum of 12 credits in the MACJ program with a 3.70 GPA or higher and have demonstrated superior writing and analytical skills in their classes. Upon applying for the thesis option, the student will need to outline their topic, plan of research, and timeline for completion in a 5-6 page proposal for the committee.  After being granted approval from the committee, the student will need to submit a thesis proposal, identifying a thesis chair and committee, to the Graduate Director. The thesis committee must include at least two criminal justice faculty members and one external member with expertise in an area relevant to the thesis topic. The proposal must include:

  • Importance of research to the field of criminal justice
  • Literature Review
  • Method

After receiving formal approval to pursue a thesis from the Graduate Thesis Committee, the student will need to produce the first three chapters to his/her Thesis Chair 6 months after Graduate Director approval date.  Failure to meet the timeline will result in being switched over the comp exam track. Additionally, failure to revise chapters to the Thesis Chair to his/her satisfaction within a three month period will result in the student being switched to comprehensive exam track. 

After writing a thesis proposal, students are required to defend their thesis proposal in an oral examination and question/answer session with their committee. The thesis proposal must be approved by the thesis chair and committee members. After the prospectus defense, the student has 6 months to complete thesis and defend or student will be switched to comprehensive exam track.  The final thesis document will be formatted as follows:

  1. Title Page
  2. Abstract
  3. Acknowledgments
  4. Table of Contents
  5. Chapter 1: Importance of research to the field of criminal justice
  6. Chapter 2: Literature Review
  7. Chapter 3: Method
  8. Chapter 4: Results
  9. Chapter 5: Discussion/Conclusion
  10. References

Students completing the thesis must enroll in CRJS 599 (1-3 credits per quarter for a total of thesis 3 credits which fulfill elective credits). Students may first register for thesis credit after completing the core MACJ courses and receiving departmental approval. Students are required to turn in two unbound copies, one bound copy, and one electronic copy of their completed thesis to the Graduate Director.  Additionally, students should consider providing a bound copy of their completed thesis to their Thesis Chair and to all members of the thesis committee. **Note:  For an exceptional thesis manuscript and final defense, students may receive an Honors Distinction in the form of a letter from the Graduate Director.

6) SELECTING YOUR FACULTY ADVISOR, THESIS CHAIR, AND THESIS COMMITTEE

Faculty Advisor/Thesis Chair

Upon acceptance into the program, you will automatically be assigned to the Graduate Director for advising. If you pursue a thesis project, once your thesis chair is identified, your faculty advisor will be your thesis chair. If you plan to complete a thesis, it is a good idea to become familiar with the department faculty and discuss your plans with one or more of the faculty members whose research interests appear closest to your own. You should discuss your interests with the faculty member you’d like to work with and with the Graduate Director. You may initiate this process at any time in the first year of the program, the sooner the better. Once you have identified a faculty member you’d like to work with in consultation with the Graduate Director, you will be assigned to this faculty member for advising. Regardless of whether or not you plan to do a thesis, you may request a specific faculty member as an advisor. Otherwise, you will either be advised by the Graduate Director and/or assigned to another faculty member.

Thesis Committee

If you opt to complete a thesis, you will need to assemble a thesis committee. The committee should consist of a thesis chair, another faculty member in the CJ Dept, and an external member. The thesis chair must be a full-time faculty member in the CJ Department. The external member may be a member of the CJ Advisory committee, a CJ professional in a local agency, a faculty member in another department and/or in another university. Your committee should be comprised of individuals who have some knowledge of the research you will conduct for your thesis project. The thesis committee should be identified in consultation with your thesis advisor no later than the end of Fall quarter in the last year of the program during which the thesis will be completed (Fall quarter of the second year of the program unless you are completing the MACJ program over a longer period of time).

7) PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

During the first year of the program, students take required foundation courses. After the completion of the first year, students take a capstone course in the summer to prepare students for either the comprehensive exam or thesis. In the second year of the program, students concentrate on elective courses and/or courses in one of three specialization areas (i.e., Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation, Investigative Criminology, Victimology) and begin working on their Master’s thesis if choosing this option. The MACJ curriculum consists of 55 Credits: 18 3-credit courses and one 1-credit course. Students will take ten foundation courses (28 credits) and nine elective courses (27 credits), four of which (12 credits) can be selected as specialization area courses.

Degree Requirements – Master of Arts in Criminal Justice (without specialization):

The MACJ curriculum consists of 55 Credits: 18 3-credit courses and one 1-credit course. Students will take ten foundation courses (28 credits) and nine elective courses (27 credits):

I. MACJ Foundation Courses: 28 Credits

CRJS 5010 Criminal Justice Theory (3)
CRJS 5020 Advanced Criminological Theory (3)
CRJS 5030 Law & Social Control (3)
CRJS 5040 Organizational Theory and Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5050 Criminal Justice Ethics and Decision Making (3)
CRJS 5060 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5070 Statistical Analysis (3)
CRJS 5080 Statistics Lab (1)
CRJS 5100 Theory and Research in Policing, Courts, Corrections (3)
CRJS 5900 Criminal Justice Capstone Seminar (3)

II. MACJ Elective Courses: 27 Credits

Choose seven to nine courses (21-27 credits) from the following:

CRJS 5110 Criminal Justice Legislation and Policy (3)
CRJS 5120 Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5130 Critical Criminology (3)
CRJS 5140 Investigative Criminology and Offender Profiling (3)
CRJS 5150 Typologies of Crime and Criminal Behavior (3)
CRJS 5160 Theories and Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation (3)
CRJS 5170 Crime Analysis (3)
CRJS 5180 Contemporary Issues in Victimology (3)
CRJS 5190 Violence and Victimization (3)
CRJS 5200 Restorative/Community Justice (3)
CRJS 5240 Crime Mapping (3)
CRJS 5250 Data and Intelligence Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5530 U.S. Marshals Service Practicum (1)
CRJS 5540 DEA Practicum (1)
CRJS 5550 ATF Practicum (1)
CRJS 5560 Forensics Practicum (1)
CRJS 5570 Trial Skills Practicum (1)
CRJS 5580  FBI Practicum (1)
CRJS 5700 Restorative Justice: Behind Bars (3)
CRJS 5910-5930 Special Topics Seminar (1-3)
CRJS 5950 Internship (3)
CRJS 5960 Independent Study (3)
CRJS 5970 Teaching Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5980 Research Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5990 Thesis (1-3)
COUN 5100 Fundamental Counseling Skills (3)
COUN 5110 Counseling Theories (3)
COUN 5130 Counseling Diverse Populations (3)
PUBM 5310 Public Budgeting (3)
PUBM 5720 Administrative Law (3)

With no more than two courses (0-6 credits) from the following joint undergraduate/graduate courses:

CRJS 5220 Issues in Contemporary Law Enforcement (3)
CRJS 5230 Punishment and Social Theory (3)
CRJS 5260 Terrorism and Homeland Security (3)
CRJS 5500 The Psychopath (3)
CRJS 5600 Forensic Anthropology (3)
CRJS 5650 Crime Scene & Medico-legal Death Investigation (3)
CRJS 5810 Murder, Movies, and Copycat Crime (3)

III. MACJ Comprehensive Examination OR Thesis Option

MINIMUM CREDITS REQUIRED FOR THE MACJ DEGREE     55

Degree Requirements -- Master of Arts in Criminal Justice with Specialization in Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation

The MACJ with Specialization in Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation curriculum consists of 55 Credits: 18 3-credit courses and one 1-credit course. Students will take ten foundation courses (28 credits), five elective courses (15 credits), and four specialization area courses (12 credits):

I. MACJ – Research & Evaluation Foundation Courses: 28 Credits

CRJS 5010 Criminal Justice Theory (3)
CRJS 5020 Advanced Criminological Theory (3)
CRJS 5030 Law & Social Control (3)
CRJS 5040 Organizational Theory and Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5050 Criminal Justice Ethics and Decision Making (3)
CRJS 5060 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5070 Statistical Analysis (3)
CRJS 5080 Statistics Lab (1)
CRJS 5100 Theory and Research in Policing, Courts, Corrections (3)
CRJS 5900 Criminal Justice Capstone Seminar (3)
 
II. MACJ – Research & Evaluation Elective Courses: 15 Credits

Choose three to five courses (9-15 credits) from the following:

CRJS 5130 Critical Criminology (3)
CRJS 5140 Investigative Criminology and Offender Profiling (3)
CRJS 5160 Theories and Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation (3)
CRJS 5170 Crime Analysis (3)
CRJS 5180 Contemporary Issues in Victimology (3)
CRJS 5200 Restorative/Community Justice (3)
CRJS 5240 Crime Mapping (3)
CRJS 5530 U.S. Marshals Service Practicum (1)
CRJS 5540 DEA Practicum (1)
CRJS 5550 ATF Practicum (1)
CRJS 5560 Forensics Practicum (1)
CRJS 5570 Trial Skills Practicum (1)
CRJS 5580  FBI Practicum (1)
CRJS 5700 Restorative Justice: Behind Bars (3)
CRJS 5910-5930 Special Topics Seminar (1-3)
CRJS 5950  Internship (3)
CRJS 5960 Independent Study (3)
CRJS 5970 Teaching Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5980 Research Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5990 Thesis (1-3)
COUN 5100 Fundamental Counseling Skills (3)
COUN 5110 Counseling Theories (3)
COUN 5130 Counseling Diverse Populations (3)
PUBM 5310 Public Budgeting (3)
PUBM 5720 Administrative Law (3)

With no more than two courses (0-6 credits) from the following joint undergraduate/graduate courses:        

CRJS 5220 Issues in Contemporary Law Enforcement (3)
CRJS 5230 Punishment and Social Theory (3)
CRJS 5260 Terrorism and Homeland Security (3)
CRJS 5500 The Psychopath (3)
CRJS 5600 Forensic Anthropology (3)
CRJS 5650 Crime Scene & Medico-legal Death Investigation (3)
CRJS 5810 Murder, Movies, and Copycat Crime (3)

III. MACJ – Research & Evaluation Specialization Area Courses: 12 Credits

CRJS 5110 Criminal Justice Legislation & Policy (3)
CRJS 5120 Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology & Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5150 Typologies of Crime and Criminal Behavior (3)
CRJS 5190  Violence and Victimization (3)

MINIMUM CREDITS REQUIRED FOR THE MACJ – Research & Evaluation DEGREE    55

IV. MACJ –Comprehensive Examination OR Thesis Option

Degree Requirements - Master of Arts in Criminal Justice with Specialization in Investigative Criminology

The MACJ with Specialization in Investigative Criminology consists of 55 Credits: 18 3-credit courses and one 1-credit course. Students will take ten foundation courses (28 credits), five elective courses (15 credits), and four specialization area courses (12 credits):

I. MACJ – Investigative Criminology Foundation Courses: 28 Credits

CRJS 5010 Criminal Justice Theory (3)
CRJS 5020 Advanced Criminological Theory (3)
CRJS 5030 Law & Social Control (3)
CRJS 5040 Organizational Theory and Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5050 Criminal Justice Ethics and Decision Making (3)
CRJS 5060 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5070 Statistical Analysis (3)
CRJS 5080 Statistics Lab (1)
CRJS 5100 Theory and Research in Policing, Courts, Corrections (3)
CRJS 5900 Criminal Justice Capstone Seminar (3)

II. MACJ – Investigative Criminology Elective Courses: 15 Credits

Choose three to five courses (9-15 credits) from the following:

CRJS 5110 Criminal Justice Legislation and Policy (3)
CRJS 5120 Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5130 Critical Criminology (3)
CRJS 5180 Contemporary Issues in Victimology (3)
CRJS 5190 Violence and Victimization (3)
CRJS 5200 Restorative/Community Justice (3)
CRJS 5240 Crime Mapping (3)
CRJS 5250 Data and Intelligence Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5530 U.S. Marshals Service Practicum (1)
CRJS 5540 DEA Practicum (1)
CRJS 5550 ATF Practicum (1)
CRJS 5560 Forensics Practicum (1)
CRJS 5570 Trial Skills Practicum (1)
CRJS 5580  FBI Practicum (1)
CRJS 5700 Restorative Justice: Behind Bars (3)
CRJS 5910-5930 Special Topics Seminar (1-3)
CRJS 5950 Internship (3)
CRJS 5960 Independent Study (3)
CRJS 5970 Teaching Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5980 Research Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5990 Thesis (1-3)
COUN 5100 Fundamental Counseling Skills (3)
COUN 5110 Counseling Theories (3)
COUN 5130 Counseling Diverse Populations (3)
PUBM 5310 Public Budgeting (3)
PUBM 5720 Administrative Law (3)

With no more than two courses (0-6 credits) from the following joint undergraduate/graduate courses:

CRJS 5220 Issues in Contemporary Law Enforcement (3)
CRJS 5230 Punishment and Social Theory (3)
CRJS 5260 Terrorism and Homeland Security (3)
CRJS 5500 The Psychopath (3)
CRJS 5600 Forensic Anthropology (3)
CRJS 5650 Crime Scene & Medico-legal Death Investigation (3)
CRJS 5810 Murder, Movies, and Copycat Crime (3)
 
III. MACJ – Investigative Criminology Specialization Area Courses: 12 Credits
 
CRJS 5140  Investigative Criminology and Offender Profiling (3)
CRJS 5150 Typologies of Crime and Criminal Behavior (3)
CRJS 5160 Theories and Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation (3)
CRJS 5170  Crime Analysis (3)

IV. MACJ – Comprehensive Examination OR Thesis Option

MINIMUM CREDITS REQUIRED FOR THE MACJ – Investigative Criminology DEGREE 55

Degree Requirements - Master of Arts in Criminal Justice with Specialization in Victimology

The MACJ with Specialization in Victimology curriculum consists of 55 Credits: 18 3-credit courses and one 1-credit course. Students will take ten foundation courses (28 credits), five elective courses (15 credits), and four specialization area courses (12 credits):

CRJS 5010 Criminal Justice Theory (3)
CRJS 5020 Advanced Criminological Theory (3)
CRJS 5030 Law & Social Control (3)
CRJS 5040 Organizational Theory and Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5050 Criminal Justice Ethics and Decision Making (3)
CRJS 5060 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5070 Statistical Analysis (3)
CRJS 5080 Statistics Lab (1)
CRJS 5100 Theory and Research in Policing, Courts, Corrections (3)
CRJS 5900 Criminal Justice Capstone Seminar (3)

II. Elective Courses: 15 Credits

Choose three to five courses (9-15 credits) from the following:

CRJS 5110 Criminal Justice Legislation and Policy (3)
CRJS 5120 Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5130 Critical Criminology (3)
CRJS 5140 Investigative Criminology and Offender Profiling (3)
CRJS 5150 Typologies of Crime and Criminal Behavior (3)
CRJS 5160 Theories and Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation (3)
CRJS 5170 Crime Analysis (3)
CRJS 5240 Crime Mapping (3)
CRJS 5530 U.S. Marshals Practicum (1)
CRJS 5540 DEA Practicum (1)
CRJS 5550 ATF Practicum (1)
CRJS 5560 Forensics Practicum (1)
CRJS 5570 Trial Skills Practicum (1)
CRJS 5580  FBI Practicum (1)
CRJS 5700 Restorative Justice: Behind Bars (3)
CRJS 5910-5930 Special Topics Seminar (1-3)
CRJS 5950 Internship (3)
CRJS 5960 Independent Study (3)
CRJS 5970 Teaching Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5980 Research Assistantship (1-3)
CRJS 5990 Thesis (1-3)
COUN 5100 Fundamental Counseling Skills (3)
COUN 5110 Counseling Theories (3)
COUN 5130 Counseling Diverse Populations (3)
PUBM 5310 Public Budgeting (3)
PUBM 5720 Administrative Law (3)

With no more than two courses (0-6 credits) from the following joint undergraduate/graduate courses:

CRJS 5220 Issues in Contemporary Law Enforcement (3)
CRJS 5230 Punishment and Social Theory (3)
CRJS 5260 Terrorism and Homeland Security (3)
CRJS 5500 The Psychopath (3)
CRJS 5600 Forensic Anthropology (3)
CRJS 5650 Crime Scene & Medico-legal Death Investigation (3)
CRJS 5810 Murder, Movies, and Copycat Crime (3)

III. Specialization Area Courses: 12 Credits

CRJS 5130 Critical Criminology (3)
CRJS 5180 Contemporary Issues in Victimology (3)
CRJS 5190 Violence and Victimization (3)
CRJS 5200 Restorative/Community Justice (3)

IV. MACJ – Comprehensive Examination OR Thesis Option

MINIMUM CREDITS REQUIRED FOR THE MACJ – victimology degree 55

Degree Requirements - Master of Arts in Criminal Justice/Juris Doctorate

Credit Requirements

Students in the joint program are required to complete 90 semester credits for the JD degree and 55 quarter credits for the MACJ degree.  In the joint degree program, students can satisfy the requirements for each degree by using a specified number of crossover credits to be chosen from a list of approved courses in each school.  This allows the student, whether full-time or part-time, to complete the two degrees in a shorter period of time than if the student sought to obtain the JD and MACJ degrees independently.  Of the 90 semester credits required for the JD degree, 12 semester credits can be satisfied by 18 quarter credits chosen from a list of specified courses from the MACJ program (listed below).[1]  Of the 55 quarter credits required for the MACJ degree, a student enrolled in the joint degree program may satisfy up to 18 of the quarter credits required for the Law concentration with 12 semester credits earned in the law school from a list of approved courses (listed below). 

Joint MACJ/JD Degree Summary

  1. Students must be admitted to both programs under the programs’ standard requirements.
  2. Students may be admitted to the joint degree program before beginning any studies and may then take their first year in either program. Alternatively, students in their first year in either the School of Law or MACJ program may apply for admission to the joint degree program during the fall term of their first year at Seattle University.
  3. Candidates for the joint JD/MACJ program must satisfy all of the requirements for the MACJ degree and for the JD degree. This includes either a comprehensive exam or a Master’s Thesis for the MACJ.
  4. During the first two semesters in law school, joint degree students may not take courses in the Criminal Justice Department.
  5. Joint degree students who begin in the law school and who have completed their first year may take one course each semester in the law school so long as they are not taking more than 3 courses each quarter in their first year of the MACJ program.
  6. The JD Degree for joint MACJ/JD students requires 90 semester credits, consisting of at least 78 semester credits earned in the law school and up to 12 semester credit equivalents (18 quarter credits) earned in the MACJ program. Of the 18 crossover quarter credits accepted, 9 credits will be from the list of approved elective courses and 9 credits will be from the list of approved foundation courses (including the Criminal Justice Capstone Seminar).
  7. The MACJ degree for joint MACJ/JD students requires 55 quarter credits, consisting of 28 quarter credits of foundation courses, 18 quarter credits of concentration courses, and 9 quarter credits of elective courses. Up to18 quarter credits (12 semester credits) may be earned in the School of Law to satisfy the concentration credits for the MACJ degree.

MACJ Courses Given Crossover Credit for JD Degree[2]

Foundation Courses:

CRJS 5010 Criminal Justice Theory (3)
CRJS 5020 Advanced Criminological Theory (3)
CRJS 5030 Law & Social Control (3)
CRJS 5040 Organizational Theory and Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5050 Criminal Justice Ethics and Decision Making (3)
CRJS 5060 Statistical Analysis (3)
CRJS 5070 Statistics Lab (1)
CRJS 5080 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5100 Theory and Research in Policing, Courts, Corrections (3)
CRJS 5900 Criminal Justice Capstone Seminar (3)

Elective Courses:

CRJS 5110 Criminal Justice Legislation and Policy (3)
CRJS 5120 Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)
CRJS 5130 Critical Criminology (3)
CRJS 5140 Investigative Criminology and Offender Profiling (3)
CRJS 5150 Typologies of Crime and Criminal Behavior (3)
CRJS 5160 Theories and Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation (3)
CRJS 5170 Crime Analysis (3)
CRJS 5180 Contemporary Issues in Victimology            (3)
CRJS 5190 Violence and Victimization (3)
CRJS 5200 Restorative/Community Justice (3)
 
Law School Courses Given Crossover Credit for MACJ Degree[3]
 
ADVC 300   Comprehensive Pretrial Advocacy (4)
ADVC 305   Comprehensive Trial Advocacy (4)
ADVC 310   Youth Advocacy Clinic/Law Practice Clinic (6)
ADVC 325   Forensics (3)
ADMN 300  Administrative Law (3)
ALDR 300   Dispute Resolution (3)
CIVL 305     Federal Courts (3) 
CNLW 315  Washington State Constitutional Law Seminar (3)
CNLW 410  Constitutional Law of Terrorism (2)
CNLW 415  United States Supreme Court Practice Seminar (3)
CRIM 300   Criminal Procedure Adjudicative (3)
CRIM 305   Criminal Procedure Investigative (3)
CRIM 315   Federal Criminal Law (3)
CRIM 320   Post-Conviction Relief (3)
CRIM 325   Computer Crime and Privacy (3)
CRIM 340   Pretrial Criminal Advocacy (3)
CRIM 350   Sentencing/Plea Bargaining (3)
CRIM 360   Capital Punishment Seminar (3)
CRIM 380   International Criminal Law (3)
CRIM 460   Capital Appeals Clinic (2)
ENVL 395   Environmental Enforcement (3)
EVID 301    Evidence Lab (1)
FAML 305  Child, Family, and State (3)
FAML 330  Domestic Violence (2)
GOVT 315  Legislative Seminar (3)
HLTH 400  Medical Fraud (3)
IMMG 300  Immigration Law (3)
IMMG 400  Immigration Law Clinic (3)
INTL 305    International Law of Human Rights (3)
INTL 402    International Human Rights Clinic (4)
JURS 320   Gender and Justice Seminar (3)
JURS 340   Law and Sexuality (3)
JURS 360   Race and the Law (2-3)
JURS 362   Law and the Holocaust Seminar (2)
MENT 300 Law, Policy, and Mental Health (3)

8) MACJ COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CRJS 5010 Criminal Justice Theory (3 Credits)                                                             
Critical analysis and comprehensive overview of historical and contemporary practices, procedures, and problems in the processing of offenders through the juvenile, police, courts, and corrections agencies of the criminal justice system. Emphasis on the examination of interrelationships between the agencies. Special attention is focused on current and important issues in the various criminal justice agencies, research conducted in criminal justice, and the impact of policy on the criminal justice system.
 
CRJS  5020 Advanced Criminological Theory (3 Credits)          
Examination of classic and contemporary theoretical explanations of crime from multiple criminological perspectives including classical, biological, psychological, and sociological theories.  Analysis of crime patterns and crime correlates and substantive focus on the application of such theories to criminal justice agencies, community, and society.
 
CRJS  5030 Law and Social Control (3 Credits)         
Study of theory and research on the nature of law and legal institutions.  Investigation into the functions and effects of informal and formal social control mechanisms, the use of law to impact social change, the relation of law to ameliorate social conflict, and an empirical investigation into the effectiveness of law. 
 
CRJS  5040 Organizational Theory and Analysis in Criminal Justice (3 Credits)                                 
Application of organizational theory to micro and macro level interactions and structures in the criminal justice system. Focus on classical, neo and post-classical models of organization and how they impact the creation or subversion of roles, norms, procedures, and goals in police, courts, and corrections. Examination of the interaction of public and private institutional cultures on resource allocation. Social psychological analysis of workplace power differentials and institutional/ actor goal and procedure conflict and deviance.
 
CRJS 5050 Criminal Justice Ethics and Decision Making (3 Credits)                                                   
Exploration of ethical dilemmas faced by professionals in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Examination of discretionary power in criminal justice agencies and different stages of the criminal justice process. Seminar discussion of/reflection on decision making and ethical scenarios in criminal justice contexts.
 
CRJS  5060 Statistical Analysis (3 Credits)                                                               
Objective of course is for students to develop statistical reasoning skills and to choose appropriate quantitative techniques for analyzing research questions in criminal justice.  Topics include the examination of the basic concepts and measures in statistical analysis, probability theory, statistical inference, and bivariate and multivariate analyses, correlational relationships, t-tests, ANOVA, and regression. 
 
CRJS  5070 Statistics Lab (1 Credit)                                                                                             
Objective of course is for students to learn the techniques of performing quantitative analyses with SPSS and then apply these quantitative techniques to interpret current criminal justice research.
 
CRJS  5080 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3 Credits)              
Current methods and techniques for conducting research in criminal justice including research design, sampling, survey research, field research, and program evaluation.  Students will design and execute their own research projects on a topic of current need of exploration in the criminal justice field, analyze findings, and summarize their research project in a formal written paper.
 
CRJS  5100 Theory and Research in Policing, Courts, Corrections (3 Credits)                                    
Review and seminar discussion of key research findings in policing, courts, and corrections. Students will be required to focus on/complete a project in a specific area in criminal justice.
 
CRJS  5110 Criminal Justice Legislation and Policy (3 Credits)                                          
Examination of the institutional and societal influences on how policies are identified, prioritized and created; how and why policies become codified. Focus on the effect research has on policy creation and/or policy amendment. Special attention to/critical analysis of the impact of particular policies on the criminal justice system such as three strikes laws, amber alerts, mandatory domestic violence prosecution, felony voting legislation, minimum sentencing guidelines, sexually violent predator laws, determinate sentencing, etc.
 
CRJS  5120 Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3 Credits)            
Logic and techniques of qualitative research design, methods, and techniques including content analysis, focus groups, case studies, interviewing, field work observation, participant observation, and ethnography in deviance, criminology, and criminal justice. Focus on ethical considerations, access challenges, data collection design and analysis, visual documentation and application of qualitative database technology.
 
CRJS  5130 Critical Criminology (3 Credits)                                                                                         
Examination of postmodern alternative theoretical frameworks and methodologies that deconstruct scientific thinking, language, and theoretical perspectives that have perpetuated oppression and have shaped construction of   crime and power relations of justice and injustice. Focus on marxist, feminist, radical, and cultural perspectives that critically challenge traditional theories and perspectives on crime and justice with attention to the ways in which the politics of meaning around race, class, gender, age, sexual identity, and marginalized groups make their way into definitions of crime and the administration of justice. 
 
CRJS 5140 Investigative Criminology and Offender Profiling (3 Credits)                                           
This course explores the use of profiles in criminological theory and criminal justice practice with focus on profiling violent crimes.  Examination of the differences between the types of crimes and criminals, what criminal profiling is, who does it, and how is it done.  It will expose profiling as a science, profession, art, or media myth, consider the ethical issues of profiles when they are used in police investigations and the prediction of dangerousness. The course is intended to provide students with a general understanding of the theory and purpose of criminal profiling and focused review of the scholarly literature on profiling. The course is not intended to teach students how to become “profilers,” but as an introduction to the theory and practice of profiling, the scientific literature on criminal profiling, and to engage students in critical discussion of the use of profiles in the criminal justice system.
 
CRJS 5150 Typologies of Crime and Criminal Behavior (3 Credits)                                                  
Examination of research on criminal behavior and crime types. Seminar discussion of the ways in which theories of criminal behavior and typology research has been applied in the criminal justice system in criminal investigation, adjudication process, correctional management and treatment, victim services, public safety, risk assessment, and prediction of dangerousness.
 
CRJS 5160 Theories and Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation (3 Credits)                                  
Study, process, and theory of investigation and crime scene processing. Focus on (1) investigation: the rhetoric and reality, (2) the methodologies for analysis of case files and investigative follow-up activities, (3) methods of developing leads from physical and circumstantial evidence, (4) the processes used in interviewing witnesses and suspects, and (5) differences in specialty investigations, and (6) assessment of the application of crime scene processing techniques and the theoretical constructs of critical thinking of inductive (analysis) and deductive (synthesis) reasoning necessary to develop and understand those actions taken by the offender at the scene of a crime.    
 
CRJS 5170 Crime Analysis (3 Credits)                                        
Introduction and overview of methods, models, approaches, and practices used in gathering data about crime and criminal behavior and examination of application of criminological theory to applied crime analysis.  Focus on analysis of criminal incidents, identification of patterns, trends, and problems using evidence and data sets necessary to determine the nature of offense behavior, modus operandi and signature, victim-offender interactions, offending patterns, offense escalation, case linkage, and identification of characteristics of offense incidents for the purpose of aiding and informing decision making and strategies in law enforcement and criminal justice.
 
CRJS 5180 Contemporary Issues in Victimology (3 Credits)                                                                                      
Victimology involves the scientific study of physical, emotional, and financial harm people suffer because of criminal activities and the role of the victim in the criminal justice system. This course examines research in victimology with attention to the impact of crime on victims, measuring crime through victimization, the social and psychological harm resulting from different types of crime, the victim-offender relationship, gender issues in understanding victimization and offender-victim dynamics, victim rights movement, public perception of victims and social reaction to victimization, the role of the victim in the criminal justice process, and crime prevention and personal safety.
 
CRJS 5190 Violence and Victimization (3 Credits)                                                                                
Examination of theories and research on aggression, violence, and victimization with attention to the gender correlates and dynamics of violence and victimization. Seminar discussion of the ways in which conceptions of masculinity and femininity are imbedded in notions of violence and victimization and how gender constructs, law, language, policy, practice shape the nature of violence and victimization and its criminal justice response.
 
CRJS 5200 Restorative/Community Justice (3 Credits)                                                                       
Review of theory and research in restorative and community justice. Focus on restorative justice initiatives that provide an alternative framework for dealing with crime in which victim needs are central, offenders are held accountable, and the government is a secondary player in the process of restoring victims, offenders, and communities to a state of wholeness. Discussion of the impact of restorative justice initiatives in the criminal justice system in the United States and around the world.
 
CRJS 5220 Issues in Contemporary Law Enforcement (3 Credits)                                           
Seminar on current issues in contemporary law enforcement. Topics addressed in the course include: The politics of law enforcement, police brutality, the impact of administrative interventions on police discretion, and police strategies such as problem-oriented policing, “hot spot” patrols, paramilitary units, and the criminal investigative process. This is a combined undergraduate/graduate course. Graduate students are required to complete additional graduate-level requirements and may only take two undergraduate courses (6 credits).
 
CRJS 5230 Punishment and Social Control (3 Credits)        
Exploration of the major social theories of punishment, historical and contemporary penological practices, and the death penalty and the modern execution process. Focus on society’s justification for punishment as a response to crime and the function and meaning of punishment in modern society. This is a combined undergraduate/graduate course. Graduate students are required to complete additional graduate-level requirements and may only take two undergraduate courses (6 credits).
 
CRJS 5240 Crime Mapping (3 Credits)                                                             
Students will learn foundational skills in spatial analysis and crime mapping. Introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to map and analyze crime patterns. In addition to practical work with GIS the course will address underlying spatial theories of crime as well as available data sources for exploring relationships such as Census data and other sources of socioeconomic and criminal justice related data.
 
CRJS 5250 Data and Intelligence Analysis in Criminal Justice (3 Credits)                                         
Students will be provided with a practical introduction to intelligence analysis as it relates to criminal justice. Topics include the history and functions of intelligence in law enforcement, the primary methods of intelligence gathering, analysis, and dissemination, and common law enforcement databases. Students will learn about the application of criminal intelligence methods to current problems faced by Federal, State, and Local law enforcement agencies.
 
CRJS 5260 Terrorism and Homeland Security (3 Credits)                                                                 
An examination of the complex concepts and issues associated with global terrorism, U.S. homeland security, and the role of law enforcement; the events leading up to the terror attacks on September 11, 2001, and those events before and after that date leading to the developing concepts and principals commonly associated with homeland security. Topics include the historical overview of U.S. and international terrorism, international and domestic terrorism issues, a framework of how the U.S. government has chosen to deal with homeland security and terrorism, the nature of executive legal decision-making regarding homeland security issues, legal considerations, natural disasters and homeland security, and the costs of securing America.
 
CRJS 5500 The Psychopath (3 Credits)                                                                                                 
Study of psychopathy and its relevance to crime, violence, and the criminal justice system. Exploration of the origin and dynamics of psychopathy with focus on forensic assessment, prediction of dangerousness, and how scientific and popular conceptions of psychopathy shape criminal justice policy and practice. Jointly offered as an undergraduate/graduate course. Maximum of 6 credits/two undergraduate-graduate courses permitted to fulfill MACJ elective requirements.
 
CRJS 5530 U.S. Marshals Service Practicum (1 Credit)                                                                        
This course is facilitated by the U.S. Marshals Service and provides students with an inside look at the roles and responsibilities of U.S. Marshals special agents and the range of units within the agency. The course meets on two Fridays (all day).
 
CRJS 5540 DEA Practicum (1 Credit)                                                                                                     
This course is facilitated by the Drug Enforcement Agency and provides students with an inside look at the roles and responsibilities of DEA special agents and the range of units within the agency. The course meets on two Fridays (all day).
 
CRJS 5550 ATF Practicum (1 Credit)                                                                                                     
This course is facilitated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, & Explosives and provides students with an inside look at the roles and responsibilities of ATF special agents and the range of units within the agency. The course meets on two Fridays (all day).
 
CRJS 5560 Forensics Practicum (1 Credit)                                                                           
This course exposes students to the interaction between the attorney and the expert witness. This is a practicum opportunity associated with the SU Law school Forensics course. Students work with/assist 3rd year law students enrolled in the SU Law school Forensics course to  prepare, research, interview, depose, and engage in cross and direct examination of expert witnesses in civil and criminal cases.
 
CRJS 5570 Trial Skills Practicum (1 Credit)                                                                         
This course engages students in a mock trial.
This is a practicum opportunity associated with the SU Law Clinic. Students work with law students and faculty to prepare, play a role, and present in a mock trial.
 
CRJS 5580 FBI Practicum (1 Credit)                                                                         
This course is facilitated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and provides students with an inside look at the roles and responsibilities of FBI special agents and the range of units within the agency. The course meets on two Fridays (all day).
 
CRJS 5600 Forensic Anthropology (3 Credits)                                                                                      
Overview of skeletal biology and its application to medico-legal death investigation.  Study of the human skeleton including the individual bones, the major anatomical landmarks, and the range of human variation.  Focus on the human skeleton in a medico-legal context including locating covert burials, processing outdoor scenes, determination of biological profile, trauma analysis, cause and manner of death, postmortem interval and methods of positive identification. The course is not designed to make students forensic anthropologists but rather to impart an overall understanding of the discipline and an appreciation for its contributions to forensic science.  Jointly offered as an undergraduate/graduate course. Maximum of 6 credits/two undergraduate-graduate courses permitted to fulfill MACJ elective requirements.
 
CRJS 5650 Crime Scene and Medicolegal Death Investigation (3 Credits)                                
In-depth look into crime scene and medicolegal death investigation.  The manners, mechanisms, causes of death, and post-mortem changes, and wound interpretation are explored.  The students will learn how to apply postmortem conditions to criminal investigations to confirm or refute evidence of wrongful deaths.  The course will emphasize crime scene search, recognition of physical evidence, techniques and methods for collection, preservation and transmission for laboratory analysis of evidence, and the courtroom presentation of investigators actions at the crime scene. A component of this course will involve development of/participation in a mock crime scene investigation. Jointly offered as an undergraduate/graduate course. Maximum of 6 credits/two undergraduate-graduate courses permitted to fulfill MACJ elective requirements.
 
CRJS 5700 Restorative Justice:  Behind Bars (3 Credits)
The criminal justice system operates on a traditionally adversarial model that pits people who have committed crimes against people who have not (otherwise known as “law abiding citizens”). When a person commits a crime, the standard societal response involves arrest, prosecution, conviction, sentencing, followed by probation, jail, or prison, and (if in prison, usually) eventual release. This process is formal, adversarial, and rarely involves an opportunity for offenders, victims, and citizens who have a direct stake in a specific offense to collectively identify and address harms, needs, and obligations to make things right (or better) in some meaningful way in the aftermath of crime.   An alternative way of responding to crime – restorative justice, has gained a great deal of attention in recent years. Restorative justice principles and practices coexist within the adversarial system. Restorative Justice is an alternative way of thinking about and doing justice with ancient roots in indigenous populations
around the world. This course examines restorative justice in a prison setting from an encounter framework engaging students who are prisoners and students who are not in reading, discussion, and dialogue about restorative justice.   The course format is based on a restorative justice practice called “encounter” which creates a safe space for offenders, victims, and citizens to talk about how crime has affected their lives and what they need to repair the harm resulting from crime in concrete ways that “restore justice.” Students will be exposed to the academic literature on restorative justice within the framework of the encounter context. Students will be expected to discuss their own personal experiences with crime, to learn about historical and global practices, and to reflect, write, and discuss restorative ways of responding to crime, and to identify concrete ways to put this approach into action. 
 
CRJS 5810  Murder, Movies and Copycat Crime (3 credits)
Examination of the relationship between crime, criminal justice, and popular culture with attention to the criminogenic and cathartic effects of film and media depictions of violent crime, specifically murder. Focus on the dynamics of moral panics and copycat crime, the reflexive relationship between media and crime, and the individual-social-cultural effects of violent images and artifacts. Jointly offered as an undergraduate/graduate course. Maximum of 6 credits/two undergraduate-graduate courses permitted to fulfill MACJ elective requirements.
 
CRJS  5900 Criminal Justice Capstone Seminar (3 Credits)                                                            
Seminar discussion of program course content areas including major research findings and classic readings in criminal justice. Opportunity for discussion, analysis, and reflection, and synthesis of program content areas and key readings in criminal justice required for the comprehensive examination. For those students preparing for a thesis, this course will put all the foundation course material into perspective and assist students in narrowing down a topic choice and provide them with the necessary structure to begin writing a thesis. The course will serve the needs of those students preparing for a comprehensive exam and students who are planning to write a thesis.
 
CRJS 5910-5930 Special Topics Seminar (1-3 Credits)                                        
Courses will be offered covering a range of special topics addressing specific issues or research in the criminal justice.
 
CRJS 5950 Internship (1-3 Credits)                                                                                        
Field experience in a criminal justice agency. Students are required to complete 50 hours per credit which may include training. Internships must be approved by the agency supervisor and Internship Director. Requirements include 50 hours per credit, reflection log, agency and student self evaluation, and synthesis paper. CR/F grading mandatory. 
 
CRJS 5960 Independent Study (1-3 Credits)                                                                                
Directed reading or student-directed project involving some aspect of research, theory, or practice in criminal justice. Students interested in completing an independent study project must submit written proposal to the supervising faculty member. Independent study projects are approved by Department Chair on a case by case basis.
 
CRJS 5970 Teaching Assistantship (1-3 Credits)                                                                                  
Students may be considered for a teaching assistantship that involves assisting a faculty member with a specific course. To be considered for a teaching assistantship, the student must have completed the course at an exceptional level. The teaching assistantship, depending on the course, includes assistance with grading, one-one work with students, facilitating seminar discussions, and other course-related tasks. CR/F grading mandatory. 
 
CRJS 5980 Research Assistantship (1-3 Credits)                                                           
Students may be considered for a research assistantship that involves working with faculty on a research project and/or conducting research in the community. To be considered for a research  assistantship, the student must have completed CRJS 506-507-508. The research assistance may involve one or more research-related tasks including literature review, data collection, data entry, data analysis, report-writing, and presentation of findings at professional conferences.  The research assistantship may be linked to the thesis option if the student is involved in extensive faculty-related research that requires preliminary work prior to/or beyond the thesis project. CR/F grading mandatory. 
 
CRJS 5990     Thesis  (1-3 Credits)                                                                                                     
Students may register for the thesis after completing core MACJ courses. Students wishing to pursue this option must obtain approval from the Department chair by submitting a thesis proposal and identifying a thesis chair and committee. The thesis committee must include at least two criminal justice faculty members and one external member with expertise in an area relevant to the thesis topic. The proposal must include: (1) Importance of research to the field of criminal justice, (2) Literature Review, (3) Method. The thesis will involve conducting original research and/or theoretical analysis of a criminal justice issue that makes a unique contribution to the criminal justice literature. Students may register for 1-3 credits per quarter and must complete a total of 3 thesis credits.
 
9) INTERNSHIPS
MACJ students may obtain 1-3 credits for work completed as part of an approved internship. Students must work 50 hours per credit, complete a reflection log, agency and student self evaluation, and synthesis paper (nature and length determined in consultation with Internship Director). Opportunities for internships and volunteer experience at the undergraduate and graduate levels include:  Washington State Department of Corrections, King County Department of Adult and Juvenile Detention, Family & Friends of Violent Crime Victims, Municipal Court of Seattle, Northwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, Seattle Police Department, King County Sheriff, King County Medical Examiner’s Office, Washington State Patrol, King County Prosecutor’s Office, The Defenders Association, U.S. Investigations, U.S. Postal Inspection, and Federal Agencies including ATF, DEA, FBI, INS, NCIS, Secret Service, U.S. Marshals, U.S. Probation, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Students may also seek internship positions on their own and obtain approval through the Internship Director (See Department website for internship opportunities and internship forms).

10) TEACHING AND RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS

Students may work as a Teaching Assistant (TA) or Research Assistant (RA) for CJ Faculty for academic credit.  Both positions offer students an excellent opportunity to acquire proficiencies in pedagogical and research skills.  For those students who are considering entering into academic positions or doctoral programs upon graduation, working as a TA or RA is great work experience. TAs assist the graduate faculty member in teaching responsibilities for undergraduate criminal justice courses.  Typical responsibilities of TAs include:  acquiring recent research for the course, assistance in grading, classroom support, and perhaps the opportunity to make a mini-presentation in the course.  RAs assist in the research of the graduate faculty member.  Typical responsibilities of RAs include: conducting literature searchers, acquiring research articles, and assistance in data collection and analysis. Students who would like to work as a TA or RA must first contact the CJ faculty member that they are interested in working with to determine the work requirements and the needs of the faculty member.  Once an agreement has been reached between the student and faculty member, the student will need to see the department chair for final approval.

11) ATTENDING PROFESSIONAL CONFERENCES

Students should make every effort to attend professional conferences for the purposes of learning, networking, and even presenting their own research. National research conferences that attract both faculty and practitioners include the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, the American Society of Criminology, the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy, Law & Society, The American Psychology-Law Society, the American Association for Correctional and Forensic Psychology, The Society for Police and

Criminal Psychology, and other professional organizations. Students are also encouraged to attend smaller regional conferences such as the Western Society of Criminology and the Western and Pacific Association of Criminal Justice Educators. Attending conferences is a great educational opportunity as students will be able to interact with faculty in the field and keep abreast of current research in criminal justice. Students are also encouraged to present their research.  For those students pursuing a thesis, it is strongly recommended that you present an aspect of your research from your thesis at a national conference.  In addition, students planning to pursue a doctoral program upon graduation are also strongly encouraged to attend and present research at a national conference.

12) EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENT CONDUCT

Upon entering the MACJ program, it is expected that students will conduct themselves in a professional manner both in and outside of the classroom.

  1. Classroom:
    • Students are expected to work hard, read assigned material, and actively participate in class discussions.
    • Attendance in class for the full class time and for all class sessions is expected. Absences from class should be minimal. If you miss class sessions, the professor reserves the right to drop you from the course.
  2. Cheating:
    • Academic dishonesty (e.g., working on individual assignments with others, cheating on an exam) and plagiarism (i.e., turning in another’s writing as your own, failing to cite sources in your writing) is unacceptable and unethical. Students found to be engaging in academic dishonesty will be removed from the MACJ program.
  3. Outside the classroom:
    • When students are off-campus, they are still representing the university and criminal justice department. Thus, students are expected to be professional when in the community whether or not they are working with a criminal justice agency in a university capacity.
    • Students should make every effort to attend CJ Department colloquiums.

13) ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

Students are required to earn a C grade or better in their courses.  If a student earns a grade of C- or lower, the student is required per SU policy to repeat that course.  Additionally, students are required to maintain a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher in the MACJ program in order to graduate.  Students who earn less than a 3.0 cumulative G.P.A. in any given quarter will be placed on Academic Probation from the Dean’s office in the College of Arts and Sciences.  After being placed on academic probation, students who fail to raise their G.P.A will be dismissed from the MACJ program per SU policy.

14) ENROLLMENT STATUS

In order to maintain your active status as a MACJ student, you need to be aware of the policy on enrollment status for graduate students at Seattle University. If you are not enrolled in any courses over four consecutive quarters, you will be dropped from the MACJ program.  When this occurs, you would be required to reapply to the MACJ program with all new application materials.  In addition, you lose access to your SU e-mail account, SU on-line, and library privileges.  To avoid this, be sure that by the mid-point of the third consecutive quarter of non-enrollment, you register for at least one credit for the next quarter of classes.  Be sure to note this policy whether you are studying for the comp exam or writing the thesis.

15) UNIVERSITY RESOURCES

Resource

Location

Web Address

Phone

Bookstore

823 12th Avenue

https://www.seattleu.edu/campus-store/

296-5820

Career Services

Pigott Pavilion, #110

http://www.seattleu.edu/careerservices/

296-6080

Center for Community Engagement

1223 E. Cherry St., Suite E

http://www.seattleu.edu/csce/  

296-2569

Counseling & Psychological Services

Pigott Pavilion, #120

http://www.seattleu.edu/caps/

296-6090

Financial Aid

USVC 105

296-2000

Information Technology

Engineering 306a

 

296-5571

Institutional Review Board

ADMN 201

https://www.seattleu.edu/irb/

296-6161

Learning Assistance Programs

Library, 2nd Floor

296-5740

Lemieux Library& McGoldrick Learning Commons

901 12th Ave.

296-6230

Law Library

Sullivan Hall, 2nd Floor

398-4220

Public Safety& Transportation

USVC 102  

296-5990

Registrar

USVC 103

296-2000

16) Criminal Justice Department Faculty & Staff

The Criminal Justice Department faculty consists of seven full-time faculty members who have terminal degrees (Ph.D.) in the field of Criminal Justice/Criminology, SU faculty in departments other than criminal justice, and adjunct faculty members who have graduate degrees in criminal justice, law or related disciplines and/or are professionals in the criminal justice field.

 

Full-Time Faculty:

Collins, Peter, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Office: Casey 331
Phone: (206) 296-5474

Dr. Collins earned his Ph.D. in criminal justice from Washington State University in 2011 with a focus on corrections, cost-benefit and evaluation research, and criminal justice organizations. His research interests include issues surrounding the death penalty, the intersection of criminal law and criminal justice policy, public policy analysis, and criminology within the context of popular culture. His research has been published in The Journal of Criminal Justice, The Journal of Offender Rehabilitation, Criminal Justice Studies, Western Criminology Review, Police Quarterly, The Prison Journal, Criminal Justice Policy Review, The Journal of Crime and Justice, and The Seattle Journal for Social Justice, as well as several other outlets. He has had four books published since becoming a part of the CJ faculty at SU Fall 2011, one focused on criminal justice management and organizations with Routledge Press (2013), an anthology entitled Crime, Justice, and Politics in the City as seen through The Wire, with Carolina Academic Press (2013), one focused on substance abuse treatment and cost-benefit analysis with LFB Scholarly Publishing (2014), followed by his most recent text focused criminal justice statistics with Oxford University Press (2015). He has completed statewide studies in Washington (2015), Oregon (2016), and Oklahoma (2017) on the economic costs associated with seeking the death penalty. His current research focus remains on the intersection on public policy and the law, with particular emphasis on bail and bond, jury selection, and sentencing practices. 

Connor, David Patrick, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Office: Casey 329
Phone: (206) 296-5478

Dr. Connor received a Ph.D. in Justice Administration from the University of Louisville in 2015.  He also holds a Master of Science in Justice Administration from the University of Louisville and a Bachelor of Arts in Radio/Television Broadcasting from Northern Kentucky University.  His research interests include sex offender policy and treatment, institutional corrections, probation and parole, inmate reentry, social deviance and stigma, and qualitative methodology.  Primarily recognized as an expert on sex offender legislation, Dr. Connor is regularly consulted by correctional agencies and interviewed by media outlets about such laws.  His work often focuses on the experiences of individuals who are involved in the criminal justice system, including employees, offenders, victims, and their families.  Dr. Connor’s most recent publications are found in Criminology, Criminal Justice, Law & Society, Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, Children and Youth Services Review, and Corrections: Policy, Practice, and Research. He is an active member of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, American Society of Criminology, and Western Society of Criminology.  Dr. Connor also serves as a board member for Interaction Transition, which is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping people find employment and other supports after incarceration. 

Gunnison, Elaine, Ph.D. 
Professor/Graduate Director (sabbatical)
Office: Casey 328
Phone: (206) 296-2430
E-Mail: gunnisone@seattleu.edu

Elaine Gunnison received her Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the University of Cincinnati in 2001 with a specialization in life course criminology, female offending, and corrections. Her research interests include understanding female offending patterns such as desistance and persistence, the applicability of criminological theory to females, understanding community corrections officers, and ex-offender reentry. Her research has been published in Crime and Delinquency, Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law, and Society, Federal Probation, The Journal of Criminal Justice, The Journal of Community Corrections, The Journal of International and Comparative Criminal Justice, The Journal of Crime and Justice, Women and Criminal Justice, The Journal of Prison Education and Reentry, The Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, The Journal of Interpersonal Violence, The Western Criminology Review, Criminology, Criminal Justice, Law & Society, Academic Exchange Quarterly, the Qualitative Report (forthcoming) the Encyclopedia of Community Corrections, the Encyclopedia of Gender and Society, the Encyclopedia of Criminological Theory, the Encyclopedia of Street Crime, Multimedia Encyclopedia of Women in Today’s World, the Encyclopedia of Crimes of the Century, and the Encyclopedia of Juvenile Delinquency. She has conducted primary research in a variety of corrections’ spaces (e.g., prisons, day reporting centers) and secondary research examining life course criminology and in corrections on the topic of work release centers. In 2013, she completed a book with Jacqueline B. Helfgott for Lynne Rienner Publishers entitled, “Offender Reentry: Beyond Crime and Punishment.”  In 2016, she finished a book (with Fran Bernat and Lynne Goodstein) for Wiley-Blackwell Publishers entitled, “Women and Crime:  Balancing the Scales.” In 2017, she completed a book entitled, “Community Corrections” for Carolina Academic Press, and she is beginning work on a book (with Jacqueline B. Helfgott) entitled, “Successful Women in Criminal Justice” for Routledge.  She is currently co-principal investigator on collaborative academic-practitioner research initiatives including evaluation of the Seattle Women’s Reentry Project. She is also currently serving as Co-Editor (with Jacqueline B. Helfgott) of Criminology, Criminal Justice, Law & Society.  She is a member of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, the American Society of Criminology, and the Western Society of Criminology. She has served as graduate director of the criminal justice Master’s program since 2008 (with the exception of 2010-2011).

Helfgott, Jacqueline B., Ph.D.
Professor/Chair
Office: Casey 330
Phone: (206) 296-5477
E-Mail: jhelfgot@seattleu.edu

Jacqueline Helfgott is Professor and Chair of the Criminal Justice Department at Seattle University. She has a PhD and MA in Administration of Justice with graduate minor in psychology from Pennsylvania State University and BA from the University of Washington in Psychology and Society & Justice. Her research interests include criminal behavior, psychopathy, copycat crime, corrections, offender reentry, community and restorative justice, and victim impact in criminal justice decision-making. She is author of Criminal Behavior: Theories, Typologies, and Criminal Justice (Sage Publications, 2008), Editor of Criminal Psychology, Volumes 1-4 (Praeger Publications, 2013), and coauthor of Offender Reentry: Beyond Crime and Punishment (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2013). She is currently working on a book No Remorse: Psychopathy and Criminal Justice (Sage Publications). Her work has been published in journals including Aggression and Violent Behavior, International Journal of Law & Psychiatry, Criminal Justice & Behavior, International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, International Review of Victimology, Crime Victim’s Report, Federal Probation, and Criminal Justice Policy Review. She has been involved in applied research and service in criminal justice since 1987. She has served as principal investigator on projects including evaluation of the crisis intervention team (CIT) model in law enforcement at the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission, the Seattle Police Department’s Officer/Mental Health Practitioner Partnership Pilot Program and implementation of the Crisis Intervention Team model, and development, implementation, and evaluation of "Citizens, Victims, and Offenders Restoring Justice" (CVORJ) a prison-based encounter program at the Washington State Reformatory. She is currently principal investigator on collaborative academic-practitioner research initiatives including evaluation of the Seattle Police Department’s Micro-Community Policing Plans, Seattle Women’s Reentry, and the Research Network on Misdemeanor Justice with John Jay College of Criminal Justice. She has served on the Advisory Board for the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services Special Commitment Center at McNeil Island that houses civilly committed sexually violent predators and on the Board of Directors for Interaction Transition (a non-profit ex-offender transition agency), and Board of Directors for Virginia Mason Separation and Loss (support services for family members following violent death). She facilitated a prison-based public art program called the “Creative Expressions Project” at the Washington Corrections Center for Women from 1993-1998 and at the Washington State Reformatory from 1993- 2010. She currently serves on the Seattle Police Department’s Crisis Intervention Committee (CIC), and is a volunteer with Aftermath: Surviving Psychopathy, a non-profit organization that provides resources and support for victims of psychopathy. She is a member of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS), American Society of Criminology (ASC), Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy (SSSP), International Academy of Law and Mental Health (IALMH), and the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals (ATAP). Outside of her professional affiliations she is a member of Marathon Maniacs and the Seattle Urban Sketchers.

Hickman, Matthew J., Ph.D.
Associate Professor/Interim Graduate Director
Office: Casey 300
Phone: (206) 296-2484

Matthew J. Hickman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Seattle University.  In addition to conducting research in the general areas of police integrity and ethics, forensic evidence processing, and quantitative research methods, he teaches a variety of both undergraduate- and graduate-level courses including statistics, research methods, criminology, forensic science, ethics, and crime mapping.  Prior to joining the faculty at Seattle University in 2007, he was employed as a statistician at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), the statistical research arm of the U.S. Department of Justice, for seven years.  There, he specialized in the development and analysis of national data collections relating to law enforcement operations as well as forensic crime laboratories and medicolegal death investigation systems in the United States.  Hickman’s research has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals including Criminology, Criminology & Public Policy, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Sociological Methods and Research, Crime & Delinquency, Police Quarterly, and Policing.  He authored over 20 governmental reports on law enforcement and related issues while at BJS.  Books include a recent introductory policing textbook, Policing for the 21st Century: Realizing the Vision of Police in a Free Society (Kendall/Hunt, 2016), and edited volumes Forensic Science and the Administration of Justice (Sage, 2014) and Police Integrity and Ethics (Wadsworth/Thomson, 2004). He has written several book chapters for edited volumes including: Race, Ethnicity and Policing; Rational Choice and Criminal Behavior; and Encyclopedia of Police Science.  Hickman is the immediate past President of the Western Society of Criminology, and he has also served as an Executive Counselor for the American Society of Criminology Division of Policing.  He is a member of the American Society of Criminology and the Western Society of Criminology.

King Stargel, Trisha, Ed.D.
Instructor
Office: Casey 332

Dr. King Stargel grew up in Honolulu, HI, and became one of the Honolulu Police Department’s first female police officers.  She finished the second half of her 25-year police career working for the Kent (WA) Police Department. Trisha holds a master in Organizational Ethics, and a doctorate in Educational Leader with focus on police training from Seattle University.  She has been an adjunct instructor for the Department of Criminal Justice at Seattle University since 2003.  Trisha served on the Citizen Review Panel for the Tacoma Police Department, and is a hearing panelist for the Decertification Hearing Board of the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission. Trisha works for the U. S. Department of Justice as a Senior Police Advisor with the ICITAP program.  Her duties have taken her most recently to Ukraine.  She and a team of leaders and trainers helped the Ukrainian government set up and train the new National Police Force.

O-Brien, Allister H, M.A.
Instructor
Office: Casey 332

Al O’Brien grew up in Seattle.  He enlisted in the Marine Core right out of high school and fought in the first two major land-battles of the Vietnam War, in August and September of 1965.  Al joined the Seattle Police Department where he served for twenty-nine (29) years.  He received his MA in Public Administration from Seattle University in 1976.  Al wrote policy for the chief of police.  Some of the policy issues he wrote include, ‘the use of drugs and alcohol by on-duty officers, use of firearms against moving vehicles, and police use of choke holds.’  Al worked on the streets of the city for twenty-one (21) years as a police officer and supervisor.   In 1984, he arrested a man who had just shot and killed a police officer at a location just north of the Seattle University campus.  Al began teaching in 1986 at City University of Seattle where he taught all of the Public Administration courses (i.e. Introduction to Public Administration, Public Policy Writing, Public Budgeting and Finance, and Intergovernmental Relations).  In addition, he taught Managing Organizations, Organizational Behavior, Introduction to Economics, and The Humanities of the Western World at City University.  Al was elected to the Mountlake Terrace City Council in 1991 where he served for five (5) years.  He was elected to the Washington State House of Representatives in 1996.  He served fourteen (14) years in the legislature and chaired the Criminal Justice & Corrections Committee for ten (10) years.  Al was a member of the Board of Directors at the ARC of Snohomish County (working on issues regarding Persons with Developmental Disabilities), and The Council on Aging (working on senior citizen care and food programs).  Al was a volunteer staff member for twenty (20) years with the American Legion Boys’ State program where he taught high school seniors about state and local government.  He began teaching at Seattle University in 2006, teaching a Graduate-level class entitled, ‘Criminal Justice Legislation & Policy.’  He now teaches Undergraduate courses in ‘Law, Justice, and Society and Crime Scene Investigations.  He also teaches Graduate courses in Crime Scene Investigation and Restorative JusticeAl is a registered lobbyist and has lobbied the state legislature regarding Human Trafficking.  He has recently worked on legislation requiring a review of sentencing for juveniles, sentenced to life in prison without parole.  He is now working on repeal of the determinate sentencing law and restoration of the parole system, and on repeal off the death sentence.        

Parkin, William, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Office: Casey 300
Phone: (206) 296-5480

Dr. Parkin received his Ph.D. in criminal justice from the City University of New York, Graduate Center.  His research interests include domestic extremism and terrorism, homicide victimization, the media’s social construction of criminal justice issues, and community public safety. Currently, he is working on research related to misdemeanor offenses and community policing in Seattle. Dr. Parkin is also a co-principal investigator on the Extremist Crime Database, a multi-institute project examining domestic extremism funded by the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism at the University of Maryland.  His research has been published in The Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Homicide Studies, Terrorism & Political Violence, Studies in Conflict & Terrorism, Sociological Spectrum, Journal of Interpersonal Violence and Economics Letters. In addition, Dr. Collins and he are working on an edited volume related to the portrayal of crime victims in the New York Times.

Rice, Stephen K., Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Internship / Career Placement Director  
Office: Casey 300
Phone: (206) 296-2338

Stephen K. Rice is Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at Seattle University. He studies cooperation and defiance in individuals’ interactions with the justice system (procedural justice, restorative justice; perceptions of racial profiling; police legitimacy; radicalization; final statements of the condemned); sentinel events; social media and criminal justice; evidence-based law enforcement. He is co-editor of Race, Ethnicity and Policing (NYU Press, 2010) and Envisioning Criminology: Researchers on Research as a Process of Discovery (Springer, 2015) and author of articles on topics to include guardian policing (Harvard Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety), radicalization, the variability of anger cross-culturally, and profiling of African Americans, Latinos, and Muslim Americans. His publications have appeared in outlets to include Criminology, Justice Quarterly, Deviant Behavior, Policing, and the Journal of Quantitative Criminology. He is a member of the Academy of Criminal Sciences and is Counselor-at-Large of the Western Society of Criminology. He received his master's degree from Florida State University and his Ph.D. from the University of Florida. 

Bechtol, Jonathan
Criminal Justice Department Administrative Assistant
Office: Casey Third Floor - East
Phone (206) 296-6339

Jonathan Bechtol grew up and finished high school in Redmond, Washington.  He attended The University of Arizona before moving to California to be close to family and attend community college there.  Jonathan returned home to Washington in 2014 and worked for three years at Costco Wholesale in Woodinville.  He’s excited to be back in the college environment and looks forward to learning about Criminal Justice and Economics. 

Andrew, Gutzmer

Criminal Justice Department Graduate Program Coordinator

Office: Casey 335

Phone: 206-296-2139

Email: gutzmera@seattleu.edu

Andrew (Andy) is joining Seattle University to begin a new chapter in his career in higher education administration and student services.  After completing his Master’s in Curriculum and Instruction at University of Denver, as well as his Bachelor’s in History and Spanish, Andy spent two years teaching English abroad at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestro in Santiago, the Dominican Republic, as well as at the Maptaputpanpittayakarn School in Rayong, Thailand.  Most recently he was a founding high school history teacher at Summit Olympus High School in Tacoma, but is excited to make the switch from the classroom teaching to university services.  He is an avid listener of the “Criminal” podcast and loves all things that encourage you to question justice, equity, history and truth.  He enjoys cooking, hiking, and sketching in his free time.

Part-Time Adjunct Faculty and SU Faculty in other Departments

Note: The list of faculty members below includes CJ Dept part-time faculty members who teach in the undergraduate program, graduate program, or both. Most of the CJ Department adjunct faculty teach in the undergraduate program, but some teach graduate foundation courses, regularly offered joint grad/undergrad elective courses, or graduate special topics courses. If you see an adjunct faculty member on the list from whom you have not had the opportunity to take a course, but would like to meet to discuss a thesis, undergraduate teaching assistantship, or research project, contact the Graduate Director or email faculty member directly. All adjunct faculty member email addresses are available on the department website: https://www.seattleu.edu/artsci/criminal-graduate/faculty-and-staff/

 
Cecchet, Stacy, Ph.D.
Forensic Psychologist
 
Conley, Darlene, Ph.D.
Criminologist/ ethnographer; Specialty in race, ethnicity, and crime, drugs/alcohol and crime.
 
Cummings, Colleen Ph.D.
Anthropologist
 
Dorfsman, Debi, Ph.D.
Supervisory Intelligence Analyst, F.B.I.
 
Fisher, Chris, Ph.D.
 
Fowler, Chris, M.A.
Captain, Seattle Police Department
 
Gleason, Tag, J.D., M.A.
Captain, Seattle Police Department
 
Gleason, Virginia, J.D.
Director of Investigations, Public Safety Investigations
 
Glenn, Bonnie, J.D.
Director, Division of Community and Parole Programs, Department of Social and Health Services, Juvenile Rehabilitation
 
Himick, Bev, Ph.D.
Supervising Forensic Scientist, DNA Unit/Crime Scene Response Team, Washington State Patrol Crime Lab
 
McIngalls, Colleen, M.A.
Director of Victim Services, Victim Support Services
 
Larm, Douglas, M.S.
Criminal Intelligence Section, Seattle Police Department
 
Niebusch, Rich, Ph.D.
Planning and Research Deputy; Recruiting Officer, Snohomish County Sheriff
 
O’Toole, Kathleen, Ph.D, J.D.
Chief of Seattle Police Department
 
Pevey, Mac, M.A.
Washington State Department of Corrections Field Administrator, Community Corrections Division
 
Richards, Henry, Ph.D.
Forensic Psychologist
 
Smith, Connie, M.A..
Chief of U.S. Probation and Pretrial Services
 
Vinson, John, Ph.D.
Chief of Police, University of Washington
 

17) CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEPARTMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Our department is fortunate to have a large advisory committee consisting of key professionals from local, state, and federal criminal justice agencies (See Appendix C). Advisory committee members serve the department by providing ideas for curricular and program development, assisting in developing internship and practicum opportunities, coordinating tours of local criminal justice agencies and facilities, serving as guest speakers in classes and/or as instructors for elective and specialization course offerings. In some cases, advisory committee members may be willing to serve as external members on thesis committees and/or in other capacity to assist MACJ students. If you are interested in connecting with an advisory committee member, contact the Graduate Director.

[1] One quarter credit is the equivalent of .67 semester credits.  So, for example, a 3 quarter credit crossover MACJ course could be used to satisfy 2 semester credits for the J.D. degree.

[2] All credits shown in this section are quarter credits.

[3] All credits shown in this section are semester credits.

Contact Us

Elaine Gunnison 
Graduate Program Director
206.296.2430
gunnisone@seattleu.edu 

Haily Perkins
Program Coordinator
206.296.2139
perkinsh2@seattleu.edu 

Matthew Hickman
Department Chair
206.296.2484
hickmanm@seattleu.edu

Connect With Us