Rebecca Cobb, Ph.D., LMFT

AAMFT Approved Supervisor

Clinical Coordinator, Couples & Family Therapy Program
Assistant Clinical Professor

Phone: 206.296.6968

License & Credentials

  • Washington State Marriage and Family Therapy License: LF60471759
  • AAMFT Approved Supervisor, #123509
  • Certified Trainer for Within My Reach, PREP Inc.
  • EMDR Level I Trained, EMDR Institute
  • Certificate in Educational Measurement and Statistics, Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, Florida State University

Education

  • Ph.D. (2014) in Marriage and Family Therapy, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, a COAMFTE-accredited program
  • M.S. (2009) in Child Development and Family Studies, with Marriage and Family Therapy Specialization, Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, IN, a COAMFTE-accredited program
  • B.S. (2005) in Psychology, Westmont College, Santa Barbara, CA

Examples of Courses Taught

  • STMC  5230  Professional Ethics and Law
  • STMM  5500  Family Therapy Theory
  • STMC  5550  Clinical I
  • STMC  5580  Clinical IV
  • STMC  5610  Career and Professional Development
  • STMC  5710  Psychopathology
  • STMC  5750  Systems of Trauma Treatment
  • STMC  5960  Research Seminar

Research Areas

  • Intimate Partner Violence
  • The influence of gender roles in couple and family relationships
  • Ethics in Couples and Family Therapy

Selected Publications

  • Cobb, R. A., Priest, J. B., & Strachan, T. B. (2016). Spirituality and religion. In M. J. Murphy & L. Hecker (Eds.), Ethics and professional issues in couple and family therapy (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Taylor Francis.
  • Cobb, R. A., DeWall, C. N., Lambert, N. M., & Fincham, F. D. (2013). Implicit theories of relationships and close relationship violence: Does believing your relationship can grow relate to lower perpetration of violence? Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 39, 279-290.
  • Priest, J. B., Edwards, A. B., Wetchler, J. L., Gillotti, C. M., Cobb, R. A., & Walsh, C. E. (2012). An exploratory evaluation of the Cognitive-Active Gender Role Identification Continuum. The American Journal of Family Therapy, 40, 152-168.
  • Cobb, R. A., Halstead, R. O., & Kmitta, K. (2012). What I look like: Outside and inside the box. In J. Chang (Ed.), Creative interventions with children: A transtheoretical approach. Calgary: Family Psychology Press.
  • Negash, S., & Cobb, R. A. (2012). Altered book making with children. In J. Chang (Ed.), Creative interventions with children: A transtheoretical approach. Calgary: Family Psychology Press.
  • Cobb. R. A. (2011). A review of “Not ‘Just Friends’: Rebuilding Trust and Recovering Your Sanity After Infidelity.” Journal of Couple and Relationship Therapy, 10, 279-280.
  • Cobb, R. A., & Negash, S. (2010). Altered book making as a form of art therapy: A narrative approach. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 21, 54-69.
  • Cobb, R. A., Walsh, C. E., & Priest, J. B. (2009). The cognitive-active gender role identification continuum. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 21, 77-97.

Selected Presentations 

  • Bradley, K., & Cobb, R. A. (2016, September). Ethical considerations for MFT-clergy collaboration. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Indianapolis, IN.
  • Cobb, R. A. (2016, March). Couples treatment for intimate partner violence: An experimental survey of MFTs. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Family Therapy Association, Kona, HI.
  • Cobb, R. A. (2015, November). MFTs’ endorsement of couples treatment for intimate partner violence. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Family Relations, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
  • Cobb, R. A., Okafor, E. S., Schwab, E. T., & Scott, J. C. (2014, March). The ethical use of social media in #MarriageandFamilyTherapy: Suggested guidelines. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Family Therapy Association, Panama City, Panama.
  • Baker, L. R., Cobb, R. A., Lambert, N. M., Fincham, F. D., & McNulty, J. K. (2014, February). Relationship self-efficacy prevents intimates from ending abusive relationships. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Social and Personality Psychology, Austin, TX.
  • Cobb, R. A., DeWall, C. N., Lambert, N. M., & Fincham, F. D. (2012, March). Does believing your relationship can grow relate to lower perpetration of violence? Poster presented at the annual meeting of the International Family Therapy Association, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
  • Cobb, R. A., Lambert, N. M., Baker, L. R., Fincham, F. D., & McNulty, J. K. (2011, November). When believing in your relationship hurts: Relationship efficacy and IPV. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Family Relations, Orlando, FL.
  • Priest, J. B., Edwards, A. B., Wetchler, J. L., Gillotti, C. M., Cobb., R. A., & Walsh, C. E. (2011, March). Gender roles in couples therapy: Evaluating the CAGRIC model. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Family Therapy Association, Noordwijkerhout, the Netherlands.
  • Cobb, R. A., Nalbone, D. P., Hecker, L. L., & Casanova, G. M. (2010, November). Influence of interparental violence on gender identity and intimate partner violence. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis, MN. 
  • Fortner, L., Olmstead, S., Cobb, R. A., Pilkington, S., & Pasley, K. (2010, November). College students and contraception: Deciding, using, and discussing. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis, MN.
  • Cobb, R. A., Nalbone, D. P., & Hecker, L. L. (2010, September). Parental IPV, gender identity, and personal IPV. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Atlanta, GA.
  • Priest, J. B., Cobb, R. A., & Roberts, K. D. M. (2009, November). The influence of gender role identification on intrapersonal and interpersonal sexual satisfaction: Implications for therapy. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Family Relations, San Francisco, CA.
  • Roberson, P. N. E., & Cobb, R. A. (2009, November). Guidelines for providing expert witness testimony as a marriage and family therapist. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Family Relations, San Francisco, CA.
  • Cobb, R. A., & Negash, S. (2009, April). Altered book making in family therapy. Poster presented at the semi-annual meeting of the Indiana Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Indianapolis, IN.
  • Cobb, R. A., McNally, C. E., Priest, J. B., & Wetchler, J. L (2008, October). The cognitive active gender role identification continuum. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Memphis, TN.

Personal Information

I believe that in order to have a complete understanding of the individual, it is necessary to have an understanding of the individual within the context of his or her family system. In addition, I believe that it is essential to consider the reciprocal influence of all aspects of the self, including mind, body, and spirit. In particular, as a couples and family therapist, it is important to possess a willingness to explore matters related to the spirit, allowing clients to delegate the extent to which each of these aspects are addressed in therapy. In my role as Assistant Clinical Professor and Clinical Coordinator for the Couples and Family Therapy Program, I seek to help students understand their clients from this systemic and holistic perspective.

The theoretical orientation with which I most strongly identify is Solution Focused Brief Therapy. Solution Focused Therapy fits well with my positive personality and my understanding that the individual is the expert on his or her own life. I believe that people often have the solutions to their own problems, and that I can aid in the recognition of these solutions by focusing on strengths and successes. In applying this model to my work with students, I incorporate a holistic perspective, helping students and the clients they serve identify sources of strength in mind, body, and spirit, all of which can be used in finding solutions. Accordingly, I demonstrate my confidence in student competence by collaboratively setting goals in supervision experiences. My hope is that students will learn to take a similar approach in working with their own clients in clinical practice.

In addition to my consistent use of the tenets of Solution Focused Therapy, I practice an integrative approach that incorporates components of narrative, cognitive-behavioral, experiential, and structural family therapies. This integrative approach can be seen in my work with students and in the ways in which I help them to conceptualize their work with clients.

Finally, I recognize that who I am as a person influences my work in the Couples and Family Therapy Program. One of my biggest strengths is the genuine care and concern that I have for students and the clients that they serve. I believe that my sincerity is evident in the ways in which I interact with others. Recognizing my authenticity strengthens relationships within the program, allows students to feel safe, and ultimately allows students to take risks necessary to take to make positive changes. Again, my hope is that students will learn to take a similar approach in working with their own clients in clinical practice.

I am passionate about my work both as Clinical Coordinator and as a university instructor. My goal is to assist graduate students in our program in becoming competent couples and family therapists who are able to integrate effective, ethical clinical practice with theological studies and spiritual formation. I am grateful for the opportunity to work with faculty, students, and community partners in the role of Assistant Clinical Professor and Clinical Coordinator for the Couples and Family Therapy Program, within Seattle University’s School of Theology and Ministry.

During my time outside of work, I enjoy cooking, traveling, hiking, and spending time with friends, family, and my adorable, fluffy Aussiedoodle. Seriously. Isn't she cute?!