Intergenerational Dialogues about HIV Prevention among African American Women in Rural Mississippi with Gayle Robinson, PhD, MN, RN

Gayle Robinson, PhD, MN, RN, nursing faculty member

Thursday, April 5, 2018 from 3:00-4:15 p.m. in Bannan 301

Please join Gayle Robinson, PhD, MN, RN for her presentation, Intergenerational Dialogues about HIV Prevention among African American Women in Rural Mississippi.

Intergenerational dialogues are used to share and transmit information from one generation to the next. This presentation focuses on the results of a qualitative study of African American mothers and daughters, grandmothers and granddaughters in rural Mississippi who were between 18-80 years of age. Through typically hour-long researcher-respondent interviews and interactions, this sample of 30 women explained how they communicate across generations to address sexual health issues and prevent transmission of HIV. The findings have implications for using intergenerational dialogues to encourage conversations about and reduce risks of HIV among this highly vulnerable population.

Since 2015, Dr. Robinson has been an assistant professor in the College of Nursing. She is concerned about women’s health generally and has focused her research on the health of African American women and HIV prevention. Related interests and activities include listening to oral stories, gaining wisdom from elders, and hearing the laughter of the young. Her formative years of family life and schooling were spent in rural Mississippi.

This presentation is co-sponsored by Seattle University College of Nursing and the Alpha Sigma Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International.