Fall 2021 Newsletter

Daniel Tamayo, DNP '24, Serving as Graduate Student Council President

Image of graduate student Daniel Tamayo seated on and wearing SU scrubs
Photography by Yosef Kalinko

"I am inspired by the university’s long-standing Jesuit pedagogy and the dedication for social justice and progress. This tradition is emphasized within the curriculum and empowers students to become advocates for creating a just and humane world." -Daniel Tamayo

Daniel Tamayo is a student in the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program and serves as President and Executive Board Chair of the Seattle University Graduate Student Council. His passion for public service and advocacy has drawn him to participate in student and local government since he was an undergraduate. He took some time to discuss more in depth about how his passion for affecting change through public policy along with a keen interest in health care brought him to SU.

Q. What drew you to pursue your DNP?

After completing my Bachelor of Science in Public Health at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, I was interested in pursuing a career in public policy, but I felt a strong attraction to the clinical health field. I decided to immerse myself in the environment by working as an emergency room medical scribe. During this experience, I was able to partner with a variety of providers, ranging from physicians (both MD and DO), physician associates, registered nurses and nurse practitioners. I was able to witness the genuine care and the resilience nurses and providers had, and it encouraged me to follow in their footsteps, so I began a search for a school that incorporated my passion for public health advocacy and the clinical aspect of health care.

I applied to many schools, but I was attracted to SU because of the innovative Advanced Practice Nursing Immersion to DNP program. It is a pathway for me to experience the compassion of bedside nursing care and incorporate that knowledge in my scholarship and as a provider. I am inspired by the university’s long-standing Jesuit pedagogy and the dedication for social justice and progress. This tradition is emphasized within the curriculum and empowers students to become advocates for creating a just and humane world.

Q. What do you look forward to most about your role as Graduate Student Council President?

I am fortunate to be serving as the Graduate Student Council (GSC) President and Board Chair. The mission of GSC is to improve the graduate student experience at SU through collaboration and to support the needs of our diverse graduate student population.

This past year has been filled with challenges and many adjustments. Despite these trials, we overcame these obstacles with fortitude and grace. My goal as President is to reaffirm our commitment to student advocacy by communicating the needs and ideas of the graduate student body to university administration.

Our council will be addressing the following topics:

  • Emphasizing equity, diversity and inclusion in the university curriculum and demographic population
  • Expanding post-pandemic services, including mental/physical health services, student support and financial aid
  • Community building and networking through collaboration with campus organizations and local businesses
  • Encourage campus engagement and active advocacy through frequent surveys and evaluations

Q. What are your plans and career goals after you graduate?

My plans after graduation are to work in a primary care clinical setting and leverage my role as a nurse practitioner to advocate for mental health resources in public policy. Mental health illnesses have been increasing in prevalence, especially after the struggles of the pandemic. I am grateful for the many students and faculty that I have had the privilege of meeting during my studies and I express my gratitude to SU for assisting me in solidifying my vocation.