Campus Community / Science / Technology and Health

New College of Nursing Grants Strengthen Clinical Skills

Written by Lincoln Vander Veen

November 16, 2022

Teacher and students inside Clinical Performance Lab.

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The Hearst Foundation & WA State Student Achievement Council provide support for simulation-based training, mirroring real-life scenarios, in SU's Clinical Performance Lab.   

Seattle University's College of Nursing was awarded $480,000 in grant funding that will provide critical support to its Clinical Performance Lab (CPL). The CPL is highly utilized and a site of innovative teaching and learning that mirrors a real-life clinical setting. Located just blocks from campus at Swedish Cherry Hill Medical Center, the CPL is a state-of-the-art, 20,000 square foot facility housing nursing simulation suites, skills laboratory areas, teaching spaces and a research commons.

The Washington State Student Achievement Council provided $280,000 to support the purchase of nine new simulation manikins, expanding learning opportunities for realistic, standardized clinical scenarios and increasing the number of simulators available for health assessment and skills courses. 

Additionally, $200,000 from The Hearst Foundation will further enhance the CPL by facilitating new, simulated learning programs focused on emotionally and technically complex nursing care, culturally aware communications and setting priorities within a team-based approach. This grant will support simulation scenarios that employ ethnically diverse trained actors as standardized patients and embedded family members. 

“Learning in a simulated clinical environment provides nursing students with a safe and effective opportunity to exercise clinical judgment, practice therapeutic communication and master hands-on skills,” says Dean Kristen Swanson. “Seattle University College of Nursing is grateful for the Hearst Foundation and the Washington Student Achievement Council's investment in simulated nursing education.” 

Carrie Miller, Associate Dean for Innovations in Clinical Education and the director of the CPL, echoes the sentiments of Dean Swanson:

“The CPL team will use the grant monies to address two specific learning needs of CON students—high-fidelity manikins for a state-of-the-art simulation space and trained actors to increase the realism of simulations. The goal of the CPL is to provide students with the opportunity to practice communication skills, prioritization and caring behaviors in a safe learning environment."

The Seattle University College of Nursing partners with hundreds of Seattle-area health care agencies, clinical facilities and communities, providing excellent learning and career opportunities for its 647 undergraduate and 317 graduate students currently enrolled in the college. 

Learn more about the College of Nursing Clinical Performance Lab and read a recent Op-Ed in the Seattle Times, penned by President Eduardo Peñalver and Dean Kristen Swanson, on “How to heal WA’s acute nursing shortage."

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