Phishing Report

Email and messaging services (such as Skype, Twitter, or Snapchat) are one of the primary ways we communicate. We not only use these technologies every day for work, but also to stay in touch with friends and family. Since so many people around the world depend on these technologies, they have become one of the primary attack methods used by cyber attackers. This attack method is called phishing. Learn what phishing is and how you can spot and stop these attacks, regardless if you are at work or at home.

What Is Phishing

Phishing is a type of attack that uses email or a messaging service to fool you into taking an action you should not take, such as clicking on a malicious link, sharing your password, or opening an infected email attachment. Attackers work hard to make these messages convincing and tap your emotional triggers, such as urgency or curiosity. They can make them look like they came from someone or something you know, such as a friend or a trusted company you frequently use. They could even add logos of your bank or forge the email address so the message appears more legitimate. Attackers then send these messages to millions of people. They do not know who will take the bait, all they know is the more they send, the more people will fall victim.

Protecting Yourself

In almost all cases, opening and reading an email or message is fine. For a phishing attack to work, the bad guys need to trick you into doing something. Fortunately, there are clues that a message is an attack. Here are the most common ones:

  • A tremendous sense of urgency that demands “immediate action” before something bad happens, like threatening to close an account or send you to jail. The attacker wants to rush you into making a mistake.
  • Pressuring you to bypass or ignore your policies or procedures at work. 
  • A strong sense of curiosity or something that is too good to be true. (No, you did not win the lottery.) 
  • A generic salutation like “Dear Customer.” Most companies or friends contacting you know your name. 
  • Requesting highly sensitive information, such as your credit card number, password, or any other information that a legitimate sender should already know. 
  • The message says it comes from an official organization, but has poor grammar or spelling or uses a personal email address like @gmail.com. 
  • The message comes from an official email (such as your boss) but has a Reply-To address going to someone’s personal email account. 
  • You receive a message from someone you know, but the tone or wording just does not sound like him or her. If you are suspicious, call the sender to verify they sent it. It is easy for a cyber attacker to create a message that appears to be from a friend or coworker.

Ultimately, common sense is your best defense. If an email or message seems odd, suspicious, or too good to be true, it may be a phishing attack. 

If a message looks a little "phishy" to you, check out the list of identified phishing attacks below. If you do not see your email on the list or if you have any questions, please contact the Help Desk

Recent Phishing Attacks at Seattle University 

Phishing Email 10.30.18

screenshot of 10.30.2018 phishing email

Phishing Email 10.17.18

screenshot of a phishing email from October 17, 2018

Phishing Email 10.28.18

screenshot of phishing email from 10.28.18

Phishing Email 10.11.2018

  • Subject: Hello
  • Body of Email:
  • screenshot of 10.11.2018 phishing email

 

  • Phishing Email 9.12.2018
    • Subject: Action Required : Seattleu Password Update Notification
    • Body of Email:
  • Phishing Email 7.19.2018
    • Subject: Check the attach...
    • Body of Email:
      A secure document was sent to you from Leigh SJ David. To view your document click on the attched link shared securely!

      Property Docs

      Open >>> {malicious link removed} <<<
      Thank you. (R) 2018 Google Support.


  • Phishing Email 7.18.2018
    • Subject: Check the attach...
    • Body of Email:
      A secure document was sent to you from Feener Jacob. To view your document click on the attched link shared securely!

      Get Started >>> {malicious link removed} <<<
      Thank you. (R) 2018 Google Support.


  • Phishing Email 7.13.2018
    • Subject: Check the attach...
    • Body of Email:
      A secure document was sent to you from Jacoby Jean. To view your document click on the attched link shared securely!

      Property Docs

      Open >>> {malicious link removed} <<<
      Thank you. (R) 2018 Google Support.


  • Phishing Email 5.9.2018
    • Subject:  [SU] University Mailbox Quota Exceeded!
    • Body of Email:  

      Your university mailbox quota has exceeded it's limit, you may not be able to send/receive more emails.

      FOLLOW HERE >>> {malicious link removed}  <<< to enable automatic increase your mailbox storage.

       

      The office of Information Security will keep this updated if information should change, but we encourage all users to run their update before Fri, May. 18th, 2018. after the expected release of this patch.

      With kind regards,
      Your IT Help desk Team
      -- Information Services & Technology (IS&T) 

  • Phishing Email 5.9.2018
    • Subject:  Update Notice
    • Body of Email: As part of our ongoing wide upgrade to our email servers, we need to upgrade your mailbox so that it will be compatible with the latest versions of software and security update such as DNS, proxies, single sign-on, ADFS, WAN, LAN, etc. within minutes to ensure 100% protection to all our users.
       
      SUBMIT TICKET FOR UPGRADE {malicious link removed}
       
      For security reasons, the Upgrade portal link will expire within 24-hours.
       
      Notice: To ensure you receive future emails such as maintenance/update notification, make sure your account is updated.
      Thanks,
      IT Support System.
  • Phishing Email 4.29.2018
    • Subject:  Important Update!

      OR

    • Subject:  Help Desk

    • Body of Email:  We're making a few improvements to our Web mail Log in page, aimed at giving our user's even better security. FOLLOW HERE >>> {malicious link removed}<<< The office of Information Security will keep this updated if information should change, but we encourage all users to run their update before Fri, May. 5th, 2018. after the expected release of this patch. With kind regards, Your IT Help desk Team -- Information Services & Technology (IS&T)

  • Phishing Email 4.25.2018
    • Subject: E-mail Abused
    • Body of Email:  Dear  User,

      Your account will be suspended due to mail policy violation

      Click <<{malicious link removed}>> to re-verify and continue usage.

      Note : Failure to do this your account will be terminated.

      Best Regards,

      Seattle University.

  • Phishing Email 3.14.18
  • Phishing Email 3.13.18
  • Phishing Email 3.7.18
  • Phishing Email 3.2.18
  • Phishing Email 3.1.18
  • Phishing Email 2.20.18 

 

For more information on protecting yourself visit https://staysafeonline.org/stay-safe-online/