Research practice event archive

Research practice - event archive

Below you will find an archive of our past events and programs on research practice topics, listed in reverse chronological order. The Center for Faculty Development staff are able to consult with Seattle University faculty on any of these topics, and many other research practice topics, as well.

Click the red plus below the year in order to view that year's list of events.

2017–18

Fall 2017 Faculty Writing Groups launch - image of typewriter

Faculty Writing Groups

LAUNCH MEETING
Tue, Oct 17 | 12:30-1:30 | Chardin 142 | Lunch provided
Co-sponsored by the Office of Sponsored Projects (OSP)

The “research on research” gives us good evidence on what helps faculty progress with their research, and in response, we’ve been launching Faculty Writing Groups since 2007. These groups provide you with camaraderie and accountability to achieve more in your scholarship. And they are intentionally interdisciplinary so that you remain the expert in your own field throughout.

By the end of this session, you will be grouped with two or three other colleagues from across campus and will be ready to meet with your group independently and regularly to help you achieve more in your research – and with less stress.

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Red pin in map

Putting Yourself on the Map: Fulbright Awards for International Research or Teaching

PANEL DISCUSSION
Tue, Jan 30 | 12:30-1:50 | HUNT 100 | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

If you are interested in international research and/or teaching opportunities, a Fulbright award is a good way to fund your academic work. At this event, a panel of recent Fulbright award recipients will share their motives for applying for a Fulbright, insights into the application process, and tips on how to gain the most from your experience as a Fulbright ambassador as well as addressing questions from the audience.

If you are interested in learning more about the Fulbright Scholar Program, contact Jacquelyn Miller (University Liaison to the Fulbright Scholar Program).

Register

Abstract image of concentric circles emanating from the mind
The “Personal Intellectual Project:” Capturing, focusing, and (re)inventing your scholarly agenda

LUNCHTIME WORKSHOP
Tue, Apr 24 | 12:30–1:50 | Pigott 306 | Lunch provided
Facilitated by David Green

Depending on our career stage, our scholarly agenda can pose a variety of challenges. For many newer scholars, it can be hard to step back and identify exactly what it is we’re doing – and why it matters. For more seasoned researchers, in contrast, we often find our passions have shifted to new topics, or that we need to reinvent ourselves as scholars in somewhat different academic fields than where we began.

Difficulty in describing our research arc can affect our chances of winning grants, of being promoted, or simply of feeling in control of our own scholarship. It can lead us to take on projects that don’t exactly align with our expertise or intellectual curiosity, and to missing out on those that do.

In this session, we’ll provide a space for you to think through your own “Personal Intellectual Project”—the big-picture encapsulation of your different scholarly topics and agendas. For newer scholars, can you sense its form yet? Do you recognize the parameters you want to set to keep it manageable? For more experienced scholars, has your intellectual project evolved since you last considered it? What has changed and what remains the same? What projects might reignite your enthusiasm?

Register 

 

2016-17

Spring 2017

Profile with swirls
The “Personal Intellectual Project:” Capturing, focusing, and (re)inventing your scholarly agenda

LUNCHTIME WORKSHOP
Tuesday, May 2 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
OR
Wed, May 3 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Facilitated by David Green

Depending on our career stage, our scholarly agenda can pose a variety of challenges. For many newer scholars, it can be hard to step back and identify exactly what it is we’re doing – and why it matters. For more seasoned researchers, in contrast, we often find our passions have shifted to new topics, or that we need to reinvent ourselves as scholars in somewhat different academic fields than where we began.

Difficulty in describing our research arc can affect our chances of winning grants, of being promoted, or simply of feeling in control of our own scholarship. It can lead us to take on projects that don’t exactly align with our expertise or intellectual curiosity, and to missing out on those that do.

In this session, we’ll provide a space for you to think through your own “Personal Intellectual Project”—the big-picture encapsulation of your different scholarly topics and agendas. For newer scholars, can you sense its form yet? Do you recognize the parameters you want to set to keep it manageable? For more experienced scholars, has your intellectual project evolved since you last considered it? What has changed and what remains the same? What projects might reignite your enthusiasm?

Fall 2016

How to write a lot: A practical guide to productive academic writing
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
16FQ-17WQ

For some of us, building and maintaining research momentum during the academic year presents challenges. For others, returning to a stalled research project that has been languishing in a folder for months poses a different sort of psychological hurdle. For others still, a productive scholarly life comes at the expense of evenings, weekends, and vacation.

For each of these situations, Paul Silvia offers an array of strategies and tactics to help us be more productive in our research – and to do so without impeding our quality of life. Drawing examples from his own field of psychology, Silvia shows not only how we can overcome our writing roadblocks, but also provides detailed advice on how to write and revise articles, improve writing quality, and succeed in academic publishing.

In this four-session Faculty Learning Community over fall and winter, facilitated by Allison Henrich (Mathematics), we will progress through the chapters of this short and lighthearted book, try out different ideas in our own research practice, and explore the extent to which the author’s suggestions fit our own individual contexts.

Over the four sessions, this book and our discussions will help you:

  • Identify any barriers that are holding you back in your research
  • Experiment with new research and writing strategies
  • Share triumphs and trials as you seek to find approaches that will work for you.

This community is for any faculty members who wish to boost their writing productivity without sacrificing evenings, weekends, and vacations.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Check out this book from the Center library.

Find out more about "faculty learning communities" and see the Center's current FLC options.

Sowing the seeds of inquiry: The whys and hows of faculty–student research
PANEL DISCUSSION
Tue, Oct 25 | 12:30–1:50 | Student Center 130 | Lunch provided
Facilitated by David Green
Co-sponsored by ORSSP and SUURA

Have you considered involving students as research partners, but are not sure how to achieve the best results? Or, are you curious about the benefits of faculty-student research for both you and your students?

Working on a research project with a faculty member has been found to be a “high-impact educational practice” (Kuh, 2008) for students, accelerating the development of important critical thinking and practical disciplinary research skills. Involving students in your research can also impact a faculty member’s research agenda in new and exciting ways as well increasing your productivity level by having a built-in accountability partner and someone with whom to share the workload.

While faculty–student research has been more prominent in the sciences, other disciplines across campus have also developed ways to work with students that ensure a best practices approach. So how do these practices look and what can we learn from our colleagues who are already engaged in this work?

In this panel discussion with SU faculty from a variety of fields, you’ll have opportunity to learn how you can nurture the skills of inquiry by creating joint faculty–student research projects of your own.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Faculty Writing Groups
LAUNCH MEETING
Wed, Oct 5 | 12:30-1:30 | Student Center 130 | Lunch provided
Co-sponsored by ORSSP

The “research on research” gives us good evidence on what helps faculty progress with their research, and in response, we’ve been launching Faculty Writing Groups since 2007. These groups provide you with camaraderie and accountability to achieve more in your scholarship. And they are intentionally interdisciplinary so that you remain the expert in your own field throughout.

By the end of this session, you will be grouped with two or three other colleagues from across campus and will be ready to meet with your group independently and regularly to help you achieve more in your research – and with less stress.

Find out more about faculty writing groups and see the Center's current offering.

Put your name on a waiting list to join a faculty writing group.

2015-16

Spring 2016

The personal intellectual project: Capturing, focusing, and (re)inventing your scholarly agenda
LUNCHTIME WORKSHOP
Tue, Apr 26 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
OR
Wed, Apr 27 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Facilitated by David Green

Depending on our career stage, our scholarly agenda can pose a variety of challenges. For many newer scholars, it can be hard to step back and identify exactly what it is we’re doing – and why it matters. For more seasoned researchers, in contrast, we often find our passions have shifted to new topics, or that we need to reinvent ourselves as scholars in somewhat different academic fields than where we began.

Difficulty in describing our research arc can affect our chances of winning grants, of being promoted, or simply of feeling in control of our own scholarship. It can lead us to take on projects that don’t exactly align with our expertise or intellectual curiosity, and to missing out on those that do.

In this session, we’ll provide a space for you to think through your own “Personal Intellectual Project”—the big-picture encapsulation of your different scholarly topics and agendas. For newer scholars, can you sense its form yet? Do you recognize the parameters you want to set to keep it manageable? For more experienced scholars, has your intellectual project evolved since you last considered it? What has changed and what remains the same? What projects might reignite your enthusiasm?

Request a consultation on this topic.

Faculty Writing Groups
LAUNCH MEETING
Wed, Apr 13 | 12:30-1:30 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Co-sponsored by ORSSP

The “research on research” gives us good evidence on what helps faculty progress with their research, and in response, we’ve been launching Faculty Writing Groups since 2007. These groups provide you with camaraderie and accountability to achieve more in your scholarship. And they are intentionally interdisciplinary so that you remain the expert in your own field throughout.

By the end of this session, you will be grouped with two or three other colleagues from across campus and will be ready to meet with your group independently and regularly to help you achieve more in your research – and with less stress.

Find out more about faculty writing groups and see the Center's current offering.

Put your name on a waiting list to join a faculty writing group.

Winter 2016

Writing your journal article in twelve weeks: A guide to academic publishing success
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
16WQ-16SQ

Do you have a manuscript that is waiting to be revised into an article for academic publication? Perhaps one where you just need a little more structure and nudging to refine and complete it? 

If so, then Wendy Belcher’s Writing Your Journal Article in 12 Weeks is designed for you. It draws on research on such topics as faculty productivity, peer review, and common writing triumphs and failures, as well as on the author’s own experience as a journal editor and award-winning author herself. In the book, Belcher presents a carefully structured process to help you revise your manuscript and produce that final paper ready for submission in just twelve weeks. 

In this four-session Faculty Learning Community over winter and spring, we will progress through the chapters of the book, meeting specific weekly writing goals in between, and producing a final manuscript ready for submission to an academic journal.

Over the four sessions, this book and our discussions will help you:

  • Demystify the peculiarities of the academic publishing process
  • Target the biggest writing challenges that faculty face
  • Proceed step by manageable step with your own writing project
  • Get published

This community is for any faculty member who is ready to REVISE a manuscript—whether a conference paper, unpublished article, chapter, or thesis—so that they can submit it to a suitable academic journal at the end of the 12 weeks. It is particularly suited to those in the humanities and social sciences.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

Find out more about "faculty learning communities" and see the Center for Faculty Development's current FLC offerings.

Fall 2015

The "Personal Intellectual Project:" Capturing, focusing, and (re)inventing your scholarly agenda
LUNCHTIME WORKSHOP
October 20, 2015
Facilitated by David Green

Depending on our career stage, our scholarly agenda can pose a variety of challenges. For many newer scholars, it can be hard to step back and identify exactly what it is we’re doing – and why it matters. For more seasoned researchers, in contrast, we often find our passions have shifted to new topics, or that we need to reinvent ourselves as scholars in somewhat different academic fields than where we began.

Difficulty in describing our research arc can affect our chances of winning grants, of being promoted, or simply of feeling in control of our own scholarship. It can lead us to take on projects that don’t exactly align with our expertise or intellectual curiosity, and to missing out on those that do.

In this session, we’ll provide a space for you to think through your own “Personal Intellectual Project”—the big-picture encapsulation of your different scholarly topics and agendas. For newer scholars, can you sense its form yet? Do you recognize the parameters you want to set to keep it manageable? For more experienced scholars, has your intellectual project evolved since you last considered it? What has changed and what remains the same? What projects might reignite your enthusiasm?

Through a structured process and through interdisciplinary conversation, you’ll be better placed to advocate for yourself and your scholarship and will have a clearer vision of viable and enticing scholarly topics for the future.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Faculty Writing Groups
LAUNCH MEETING
October 14, 2015

The “research on research” gives us good evidence on what helps faculty progress with their research, and in response, we’ve been launching Faculty Writing Groups since 2007. These groups provide you with camaraderie and accountability to achieve more in your scholarship. And they are intentionally interdisciplinary so that you remain the expert in your own field throughout.

By the end of this session, you will be grouped with two or three other colleagues from across campus and will be ready to meet with your group independently and regularly to help you achieve more in your research – and with less stress.

Find out more about faculty writing groups and see the Center's current offering.

Put your name on a waiting list to join a faculty writing group.

2014-15

Spring 2015

Working with communities not one's own: Effective research that earns trust and values reciprocity
GUEST SPEAKER DISCUSSION SESSION
April 23, 2015
Presenter: Professor Emerita Annette Kolodny, University of Arizona
Co-sponsored by Dr. Christina Roberts, Program Director for Indigenous Initiatives at SU

How can we research communities to which we do not belong – and do so in affirming and respectful ways? As more faculty across campus engage in community-based research (and teaching) in a variety of settings, this question is becoming more pressing than ever.

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) runs risks: An outside researcher may inadvertently be insensitive to the group’s cultural expectations or may take a condescending colonialist tone; at the opposite extreme, the researcher may be so enthused with the community as to lose nuance and perspective in the research. The cultural quagmire of CBPR is expansive.

Fortunately, though, we have models on which to draw.

Join Annette Kolodny—Professor Emerita from the University of Arizona and author of In Search of First Contact: The Vikings of Vinland, the Peoples of the Dawnland, and Anglo-American Anxiety of Discovery (2012)—as she talks about working with communities not her own and draws on her collaborative work with Mi’kmaq, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot communities. Hearing and discussing Annette’s CBPR experiences will leave you feeling better informed about constructive, edifying, AND nuanced ways to work with communities not your own.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Faculty Writing Groups
LAUNCH MEETING
April 15, 2015

The “research on research” gives us good evidence on what helps faculty progress with their research, and in response, we’ve been launching Faculty Writing Groups since 2007. These groups provide you with camaraderie and accountability to achieve more in your scholarship. And they are intentionally interdisciplinary so that you remain the expert in your own field throughout.

By the end of this session, you will be grouped with two or three other colleagues from across campus and will be ready to meet with your group independently and regularly to help you achieve more in your research – and with less stress.

Find out more about faculty writing groups and see the Center's current offering.

Put your name on a waiting list to join a faculty writing group.

Winter 2015

How to write proposals that get funded and papers that get cited
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
March 3, 2015
NCFDD presenter: Joshua Schimel | SU Hosts: David Green and Jacquelyn Miller

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

Communicating in science is not just to tell us what you did and found, but to use that information to create new understanding—to tell a story about nature works. Writing science is about distilling the key messages and giving them to your readers so that the critical pieces are in the right places and are clear and compelling. In this workshop we will discuss how we adapt different “story structures” to different types of science writing—for example why the essence of a paper is the conclusions and so uses a structure that builds to the conclusions, while the essence of a proposal is the questions and so “if you haven’t told them in first two pages, you haven’t told them." We will work though examples illustrating how to frame the key pieces of a story: the opening, challenge, action, and resolution. I use concepts on writing and on being a writer from the best writers on writing, but adapt them to the unique challenges we face as working scientists trying to get our messages across in a world that is saturated with publications—how to write proposals that get funded and papers that get cited.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Intersections
RESEARCH SANDBOX
February 6, 2015

“Research sandboxes” are a chance for us as faculty to meet over drinks and appetizers to think creatively about our scholarship on a variety of topics that cross disciplinary boundaries. Our focus for this session is “intersectionality” – that complex interaction of cultural, social, and biological categories that can lead to very different experiences of privilege, discrimination, and stereotyping, and that can be applied in many fields of study. Two specific examples of intersectional research to be shared at this event are:

  • How do age and race impact career success? Studies have found (a) that minority executives ascended the corporate ladder later than their white counterparts, and (b) that in some industries, age is stereotyped such that older workers are less desirable, regardless of race. Few researchers have examined leadership opportunities and work experience at the intersection of race and age. Holly Ferraro (Management, Albers) sets out to do so.
  • Seattle is a dynamic city that is lauded for its progressive politics and environmentally oriented population. However, these progressive politics also contribute to gentrification and marginalize and/or pathologize communities that are rendered abject. In 2010, Krista Comer, scholar of the American West, expressed that critical regionalism offers literary scholars an opportunity to consider contact zones and to theorize "the intersections of cultural imaginaries, everyday life, and structures of place-d feeling." Christina Roberts (English, Arts & Sciences) is building upon these ideas in her intersectional analysis of our shared city.

Whether intersectionality is a key theme of your own research, a new area you’re developing, or simply one you’d like to learn about and experiment with in conversation, please join us for a convivial and thought-provoking gathering.

 

Stylish Academic Writing
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
14WQ-15SQ

Why is it that some academic writing appears to sparkle, while other texts feel flat and dull? What stylistic strategies do the most acclaimed academics use in their writing to present elegant ideas and data in elegant language? In Stylish Academic Writing (Harvard UP, 2012), Helen Sword shares key strategies and approaches that can breathe life into our academic work, recapturing through language the excitement we felt when we first developed our ideas. Based on her study of 1,000 academic articles, she provides examples from some of the best writers in the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities for us to emulate in our own writing, along with clear guidance on how to get there.

In this four-session Faculty Learning Community over winter and spring, we will progress through the chapters and will craft and revise our own writing following Sword’s recommendations. We’ll discuss the stylistic habits – both good and bad – that we identify in our writing along the way, as well as strategies for strengthening the good and eliminating the bad.

This community is for any faculty member who is working on academic writing for publication. You may be working on a new paper from scratch, or rewriting a dissertation into something more digestible, or revising a manuscript that you know you could improve.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

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Fall 2014

Interdisciplinary common ground: A research sandbox event
October 29, 2014
Co-sponsored by the Consortium of Interdisciplinary Scholars, and the Lemieux Library & McGoldrick Learning Commons

This is the first in our “research sandbox” series of events: a chance for us as faculty to meet over drinks and appetizers to think creatively about our interdisciplinary work and hatch plans for collaboration.

Many of us work at the edge of our disciplines or between disciplines. Either way we have to find common ground between conflicting insights from diverse sources.

“Interdisciplinary common ground is one or more concepts or assumptions through which conflicting insights or theories can be largely reconciled and subsequently integrated, thus enabling collaborative communication between disciplines” (Repko, 2012, p. 322).

What kind of common ground have you found in your work? How do you enable collaborative communication between disciplines? What collaboration would you like to achieve?

Request a consultation on this topic.

 

Faculty Writing Groups
LAUNCH MEETING
October 9, 2014

The “research on research” gives us good evidence on what helps faculty progress with their research, and in response, we’ve been launching Faculty Writing Groups since 2007. These groups provide you with camaraderie and accountability to achieve more in your scholarship. And they are intentionally interdisciplinary so that you remain the expert in your own field throughout.

By the end of this session, you will be grouped with two or three other colleagues from across campus and will be ready to meet with your group independently and regularly to help you achieve more in your research – and with less stress.

Find out more about faculty writing groups and see the Center's current offering.

Put your name on a waiting list to join a faculty writing group.

2013-14

Spring 2014

 

Writing through writer's block: How to turn research obstacles into insights
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
May 27, 2014
NCFDD presenter: Naomi Greyser | SU Host: David Green

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

Many faculty members report feeling stuck in their writing, unsure of where or how to start, setting themselves unrealistic and overwhelming expectations, and unable to respond adequately to reviewers' expectations or critiques.

The litany of negative faculty sentiments around writing makes for intimidating reading: boredom, self-loathing, guilt, shame, avoidance, and pain.

If any of this sounds familiar or reflects your experience with the writing process, you are not alone. It may be useful to regard those writing blocks as opportunities for clarity around your research aims and intellectual investments.

In this guest expert NCFDD tele-workshop, we will explore the multiple forms that writing blocks take, consider challenges that in particular underrepresented faculty may experience in relation to writing, and identify strategies for attending to blocks so as to turn obstacles into insight. Along the way, we will share stories about how incredibly tough writing can be, and develop strategies that will help us sit down with our projects and make progress-writing through writer's block.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Winter 2014

 

Revise and resubmit: A conversation with journal editors
PANEL DISCUSSION
January 28, 2014
Facilitated by David Green

In many of our disciplines, publishing in scholarly journals is the coin of the realm. Many SU faculty are also deeply invested not only in publishing, but also in reviewing for journals—that hidden and significant contribution to the advancement of their disciplines.

Yet even with this level of professional engagement, what happens behind the scenes in academic journals is often unclear. In the Center for Faculty Development, we regularly have conversations with colleagues wondering how best to communicate with an editor, how to respond to reviewers’ comments, and how faculty can put themselves in the editors’ shoes so that they can be low-maintenance and high-value colleagues.

In this panel discussion, you’ll be able to raise your own questions with journal editors from a range of disciplines here at Seattle University. You’ll hear how different journals handle tricky situations, which parts of the process most matter to the editors, and how you can enhance your reputation across your own disciplinary community.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Fall 2013

 

Faculty Writing Groups
LAUNCH MEETING
October 16, 2013

The “research on research” gives us good evidence on what helps faculty progress with their research, and in response, we’ve been launching Faculty Writing Groups since 2007. These groups provide you with camaraderie and accountability to achieve more in your scholarship. And they are intentionally interdisciplinary so that you remain the expert in your own field throughout.

By the end of this session, you will be grouped with two or three other colleagues from across campus and will be ready to meet with your group independently and regularly to help you achieve more in your research – and with less stress.

Find out more about faculty writing groups and see the Center's current offering.

Put your name on a waiting list to join a faculty writing group.

 

Thinking like your editor
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
13FQ-14WQ

Would you like to write a book about your area of expertise for a broad audience, but you’re not sure where to begin? In this five-session series over Fall and Winter Quarters, you’ll learn some of the trade secrets for writing a successful nonfiction book. We’ll be reading and discussing Thinking Like Your Editor: How to Write Great Serious Nonfiction – and Get It Published, recommended by editors at Harvard University Press, Oxford University Press, and HarperCollins, to name just a few. We won’t be talking about how to write a book for the dozen specialists in your field, but how to write a book that’s sold at regular bookstores and reaches 1,000 or more people a year. Whether you’re already outlining chapters or you’re just toying with the glimmer of a book idea, this faculty learning community can take your thinking and writing where you most need them to go.

Over the course of this 5-part series, you’ll

  • set goals for what you want to achieve by the end of Fall and Winter quarters,
  • learn insights about the book publishing business,
  • work on questions that can help you narrow or broaden (whichever you need more) your thinking on your book,
  • analyze a successful book proposal,
  • have the support of colleagues who are facing similar issues, and
  • make progress on achieving your book writing goals.

You can be at the early thinking stages of your book idea or you can already be writing chapters. We do ask, however, that you come with the intent to work on a nonfiction book project for a broad audience, rather than a niche book for a select group of like-minded specialists or a journal article. We’ll be able to provide the best support for one another if we’re facing similar challenges.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

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2012-13

Spring 2013

Faculty writing groups informational session
LAUNCH MEETING
April 30, 2013

The “research on research” gives us good evidence on what helps faculty progress with their research, and in response, we’ve been launching Faculty Writing Groups since 2007. These groups provide you with camaraderie and accountability to achieve more in your scholarship. And they are intentionally interdisciplinary so that you remain the expert in your own field throughout.

By the end of this session, you will be grouped with two or three other colleagues from across campus and will be ready to meet with your group independently and regularly to help you achieve more in your research – and with less stress.

Find out more about faculty writing groups and see the Center's current offering.

Put your name on a waiting list to join a faculty writing group.

Winter 2013

No research practice events held this quarter.

Fall 2012

 

Habits of highly successful academic writers
AFTERNOON WORKSHOP
October 23, 2012
Presented by Helen Sword, The University of Auckland, Aotearoa, New Zealand
Co-sponsored by the Office of Research Services and Sponsored Projects (ORSSP)

“Publish or perish” is the mantra of the successful academic. Yet few academics have been explicitly trained as writers, and fewer still have been schooled in the intricate art of maintaining research productivity without sacrificing work-life balance. Helen Sword, author of Stylish Academic Writing, has interviewed more than 70 successful faculty members from across the disciplines to find out about their professional formation as writers, their daily work habits, and their habits of mind. In this interactive workshop, she will present a smorgasbord of evidence-based strategies for colleagues who aspire to write more confidently, stylishly, engagingly, daringly, or simply more prolifically.

Helen Sword is associate professor in the Centre for Academic Development at the University of Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand. She works with faculty from across the disciplines on a variety of teaching and research initiatives, as well as continuing to teach in literary studies. She holds a PhD in Comparative Literature from Princeton University. Her most recent publication is Stylish Academic Writing from Harvard University Press (2012).

 

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

Faculty writing groups informational session
LAUNCH MEETING
October 3, 2012

The “research on research” gives us good evidence on what helps faculty progress with their research, and in response, we’ve been launching Faculty Writing Groups since 2007. These groups provide you with camaraderie and accountability to achieve more in your scholarship. And they are intentionally interdisciplinary so that you remain the expert in your own field throughout.

By the end of this session, you will be grouped with two or three other colleagues from across campus and will be ready to meet with your group independently and regularly to help you achieve more in your research – and with less stress.

 

Find out more about faculty writing groups and see the Center's current offering.

Put your name on a waiting list to join a faculty writing group.

2011-12

Spring 2012

Faculty writing groups informational session
April 25, 2012

Winter 2012

No research practice events held this quarter.

Fall 2011

Rigorous enough to publish: Turning your teaching into a research project
Therese Huston | November 8 or 9, 2011

Request a consultation on this topic.

Faculty writing groups informational session
October 6, 2011

2010-11

Spring 2011

Faculty writing groups informational session
April 21, 2011

Writing, procrastination, and resistance: How to identify what's holding you back and move through it
April 8, 2011
Presented by Kerry Ann Rockquemore (National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity)
Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost and Albers School of Business and Economics

 

Winter 2011

No research practice events held this quarter.

Fall 2010

Faculty writing groups informational session
October 13, 2010

2009-10

Spring 2010

Faculty writing groups informational session
April 15, 2010

Winter 2010

No research practice events held this quarter.

Fall 2009

No research practice events held this quarter.

2008-09

Spring 2009

No research practice events held this quarter.

Winter 2009

Generating outside funding
January 30, 2009
Presented by Leesa Brown (Sponsored Research), Barbara Dolby, and Jane Spalding (University Advancement)

Request a consultation on this topic.

Fall 2008

Faculty writing groups informational session
October 15, 2008


More information coming soon; check back here later!