Professional development event archive

Professional development - event archive

Below you will find an archive of our past events and programs on professional development topics, listed in reverse chronological order. The Center for Faculty Development staff are able to consult with Seattle University faculty on any of these topics, and many other professional development topics, as well.

Click the red plus below the year in order to view that year's list of events.

2018–19

18FQ Essential Department Chair

Faculty Learning Community #1:
The Essential Department Chair

In this four-session Learning Community facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller (Center for Faculty Development) over fall quarter, invited participants – all department chairs and program directors who have started in their roles in the last two academic years – will work their way through the chapters in the book so that they feel better prepared to fulfill their academic leadership roles and thrive.

As this Faculty Learning Community has a limited pool of participants, registration occurs outside our usual processes.

 

image of person's hand selecting from colored straws

 

The short straw? Pros and cons of becoming a department chair

LUNCHTIME PANEL DISCUSSION
Tue, Oct 23 | 12:30–2:00 | CHDN 143 [Note change of room from original announcement] | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

Might your future involve a stint as a department chair or a program director? If so, do you look forward to taking on this role or dread it like the plague? In this frank Q&A discussion, you’ll meet a panel of former and current chairs and directors to discover what these roles entail and how they can contribute to the smooth functioning of your area and the university. Learn about some of the possible pitfalls and hidden pleasures of chairing to help you figure out whether, for you, this really would be the short straw or a rewarding opportunity.

The session also includes a Q&A in a confidential environment.

Register

2017–18

Cover of

Faculty Learning Community #1: 
The slow professor: 
Challenging the culture of speed in the academy

Are you interested in challenging the corporatization of the contemporary university’s increasing demands of speed and efficiency from faculty regardless of the consequences for education and scholarship? Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber’s The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy presents both an analysis of the culture of speed in the academy and ways of alleviating stress while improving teaching, research, and collegiality.

In this two-session Learning Community facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller (Center for Faculty Development) during fall quarter, you'll work your way through the chapters of the book so that you are better prepared to live the principles of the Slow movement in academic life as a counter to the erosion of humanistic education.

2a. What's in it for you? 

Over the two sessions, you'll learn how to adopt the principles of the Slow movement into your professional practice in an effective way to:

  • Alleviate work stress
  • Preserve humanistic education
  • Resist the corporate university

2b. Who is it suited to? 

This community is primarily for any faculty member who is interested in learning about changes in academic culture due to a more corporate approach and how to offset those changes in order to improve life–work balance.

The Slow Professor is just 94 pages long, and reading will be split across the two sessions to be manageable for participants.

2c. What are the dates?

The two dates in Fall Quarter are:

  • Thu, Oct 19 | 10:30-11:45 | Wismer Room (LOYA 400)
  • Thu, Nov 2 | 10:30-11:45 | Wismer Room (LOYA 400)

2d. How to register

Registration is now closed. 

 

Cover of

Faculty Learning Community #2:
The New Academic

Are you interested in learning about the culture of academia and how to be a more effective faculty member, but are not sure where to begin? Shelda Debowski’s The New Academic: A Strategic Handbook provides a guide for those new(-ish) to academe on how to develop an engaging and productive career as a faculty member.

In this four-session Learning Community facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller (Center for Faculty Development) over winter quarter, you'll work your way through the chapters in the book so that you feel better prepared to fulfill the various roles—colleague, teacher, scholar, disciplinary expert, public professional—expected of a new academic. 

What's in it for you? 

Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

  • Get started - or reboot - as an academic
  • Make a difference as an effective teacher
  • Build an effective research track record
  • Learn how to engage effectively with the public
  • Advance your career in an academic setting

Who is it suited to? 

This community is for any faculty member who is in the early stage of their academic career.

The New Academic is 219 pages long, and the reading will be split across the four sessions to be manageable for participants.

What are the dates?

The four dates in Winter Quarter are:

  • Wed, Jan 31 | 2:15-3:30 | Wismer Room (LOYA 400)
  • Wed, Feb 14 | 2:15-3:30 | Wismer Room (LOYA 400)
  • Wed, Feb 28 | 2:15-3:30 | Wismer Room (LOYA 400)
  • Wed, Mar 14 | 2:15-3:30 | Wismer Room (LOYA 400)

How to register

Register by 9:00 a.m. on Tue, Jan 16

Red pin in map

Putting Yourself on the Map: Fulbright Awards for International Research or Teaching

PANEL DISCUSSION
Tue, Jan 30 | 12:30-1:50 | HUNT 100 | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

If you are interested in international research and/or teaching opportunities, a Fulbright award is a good way to fund your academic work. At this event, a panel of recent Fulbright award recipients will share their motives for applying for a Fulbright, insights into the application process, and tips on how to gain the most from your experience as a Fulbright ambassador as well as addressing questions from the audience.

If you are interested in learning more about the Fulbright Scholar Program, contact Jacquelyn Miller (University Liaison to the Fulbright Scholar Program).

Register

 

Faculty Learning Community #6: 
The Prudent Professor

Edwin Bridges’ The Prudent Professor is a practical guide for faculty at any age who want to prepare for the financial aspects of retirement, and not just let it happen. The book draws on the author’s own careful research and long personal experience in building—and protecting—his retirement funds. He describes with candor his own successes and mistakes and his short, concise chapters provide both the rationale and methodology to identify one’s own personal goals at each stage of one’s career.

In this four-session Learning Community, facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller (Center for Faculty Development) during spring quarter, we'll work our way through the chapters of the book to determine what might work best for you in your own situation.

What's in it for you? 

Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

  • Retirement saving strategies
  • Pre-retirement considerations
  • Assessing different income streams during retirement
  • How to make sure your retirement income lasts as long as you do

Who is it suited to? 

This community is primarily for any faculty member who is interested in retirement planning.

The Prudent Professor is 334 pages long, and reading will be split across the four sessions to be manageable for participants.

What are the dates?

The four dates in Spring Quarter are:

  • Tue, Apr 17 | 12:20-1:30 |  Wismer Room (LOYA 400)
  • Tue, May 1 | 12:20-1:30 |  Wismer Room (LOYA 400)
  • Tue, May 15 | 12:20-1:30 |  Wismer Room (LOYA 400)
  • Tue, May 29 | 12:20-1:30 |  Wismer Room (LOYA 400)

How to register

Register by 9:00 a.m. on Monday, April 9.

Fulbright logo with world map
Fulbright Scholar Program: Informational session for faculty and staff
LUNCHTIME WORKSHOP
Mon, Apr 23 | 12:20–2:00 | Student Center 210 | Lunch provided
Presenter: Athena Fullay | SU Host: Jacquelyn Miller

This session will be facilitated by Athena Fullay, Outreach and Recruitment Specialist at the Institute of International Education, the organization that oversees the Fulbright Program.

At the session you will:

  • Learn about teaching and research opportunities in more than 125 countries
  • Get advice on selecting countries for application and making contacts abroad
  • Explore how your campus can host visiting foreign Fulbright scholars
  • Get tips on how to prepare the Fulbright application

If you are interested in learning more about the Fulbright Scholar Program, contact Jacquelyn Miller (University Liaison to the Fulbright Scholar Program).

Register 

Ziggurat against a blue sky
Pinnacle of the profession: Scaling the heights to full professor
PANEL DISCUSSION
Wed, May 2 | 12:30–1:50 | Pigott 304 | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

For many tenure-track faculty, achieving the rank of full professor signifies that they’ve reached the pinnacle of their profession. The process for reaching that pinnacle, however, often feels rather mysterious and perhaps even too daunting to consider.

Meet a panel of current full professors to discover how they successfully achieved this next stage in their careers. Learn about some of the best practices to follow or possible pitfalls to avoid as you consider your own academic path to the heady heights of full professor.

The session also includes a Q&A in a confidential environment.

Register 

 

2016-17

Spring 2017

desert road

“Where do I go from here?” Mid-career faculty in the driver’s seat

LUNCHTIME WORKSHOP
Wednesday, May 10 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

Research tells us that faculty generally experience greater dissatisfaction during the middle years of their careers. Reasons given for this trend include lengthy professional lives; increased workload; an absence of motivating professional goals; diversified faculty appointment types; and the fact that individuals’ mid-career years are often also mid-life years, which in many cases is a time of reflection and reassessment.

Which areas of your life will give you greatest satisfaction at this stage? Will you want to work on your teaching practices, for instance, or engage your disciplinary peers through professional service to your field? Or maybe it’s community service or academic leadership roles that interest you. How can you take control of your direction so that you feel you’re on the right road?

In this workshop, you’ll have an opportunity to articulate some of your professional and personal goals for the next five years and to create an action plan that is sensible and sustainable. We’ll also consider how department chairs, program directors, and faculty serving on personnel committees can support mid-career faculty in achieving their goals.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Connection of hubs

NCFDD Webinar | Cultivating your network of mentors, sponsors, and collaborators
LUNCHTIME WORKSHOP
Tuesday, May 16 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

  • Do you have a reliable and strong network of mentors?
  • Are you struggling to cultivate mentoring relationships?
  • Do you know the difference between a mentor and a sponsor?
  • Are you moving to a new stage of your career and wondering how to find new mentors and sponsors that are appropriate to the next level?

If so, join us for a webinar that will help you:

  • Map your current mentoring network
  • Identify your unmet needs
  • Plan how to expand your existing network to meet your current needs

 

 

Winter 2017

Before you press “Send”: Email strategies for professional and positive relationships with your students 
Tue, Feb 14 | 9:30-1:00 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
OR
Wed, Feb 15 | 9:30-1:00 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Bryan Ruppert | Albers

Email is an easy-to-use form of communication between faculty and students. We can email them and they can email us about any topic related to the course from anywhere and at any time of day—or night.

Yet how often do you feel that:

  • you’re overwhelmed by the sheer volume of email from students?
  • you spend a disproportionate amount of time replying to an email that took a student only a few moments to send?
  • you agonize for far too long over how to phrase something in an email to a student?
  • you wish you could pull an email back after having hit “send?”

In this half-day workshop, we’ll look at what communication research and one instructor’s application of that research suggest are successful practices in email use in the Seattle University context. We’ll review emerging basic etiquette in professional email and explore how to apply this etiquette to our own context of emails to and from students. Together we’ll identify common themes in faculty–student email communication and draft email templates for recurring message types.

You’ll leave the workshop with a sense of when email can work for or against student learning and professional formation. Importantly, you’ll also see how you can reduce the time you spend in your inbox.

 

Future-proofing your career: NTT faculty in the driver's seat
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
Tue, Feb 21 | 12:30-1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
OR
Wed, Feb 22 | 12:30-1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

This roundtable discussion is specifically for non-tenure-track faculty, whether you are working full-time on a multi-year contract, teaching one or two courses a year, or any scenario in between.

How do you position yourself to flourish in a changing national higher education landscape? How do you maximize your talents and find your niche? Becoming “future-proof” means being aware of trends and being better able to position yourself when unexpected opportunities arise. It can bring you a sense of empowerment as you take a more mindful and strategic approach to your own career.

The purpose of this roundtable discussion is to share successes and strategies so that you will be better placed to create an action plan that will help you make your career in the academy more sustainable, meaningful, and rewarding.

Request a consultation on this topic.

How women decide: What's true, what's not, and what strategies spark the best choices
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
17WQ-17SQ

Are you interested in gaining confidence that you and those with whom you work and play can make decisions that lead to effective and meaningful results? Therese Huston’s How Women Decide: What’s True, What’s Not, and What Strategies Spark the Best Choices explodes stereotypes and myths about female decision-making in order to offer intelligent guidance to the challenges and process of crafting better choices and becoming more courageous leaders.

In this four-session Learning Community facilitated by Jennifer Marrone (Department of Management) over winter and spring, you'll work your way through the chapters of the book so that you feel better prepared not only to make individual decisions, but to lead others, whether work colleagues, friends, or family, and to develop tactics and skills that will lead to wiser and stronger decisions.

Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

  • Dismantle myths and stereotypes about women (and men) as decision-makers
  • Recognize when you are in situations that often lead to poor decision-making
  • Make better decisions and present them with greater confidence based on physiological, psychological, and social science research
  • Develop better decision-making strategies and processes for work teams and/or committees

This community is for any faculty member who is interested in learning how to improve her/his decision-making skills and processes.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Borrow this book from the Center library.

Find out more about "faculty learning communities" and find out about the Center's current FLC offerings.

 

The department chair as transformative diversity leader: Building inclusive learning environments in higher education
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
17WQ-17SQ
Co-sponsored by the Wismer Office

Are you interested in seeking concrete tools and strategies for successfully implementing diversity in your department or program? Edna Chun and Alvin Evans’s The Department Chair as Transformative Diversity Leader: Building Inclusive Learning Environments in Higher Education provides practical, research-based approaches representative of best practices from across the United States to achieve this result.

In this four-session Learning Community facilitated by Jodi O’Brien, (Director, Wismer Center for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion) and Jacquelyn Miller (Center for Faculty Development) over winter and spring, you'll work your way through the chapters of the book so that you are better prepared to lead other faculty in advancing diversity in the several areas, including tenure and promotion, curricular change, student learning outcomes, departmental climate, and the representation of a diverse faculty and staff.

Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

  • Implement a conceptual framework for diversity transformation
  • Develop strategies for attaining consensus on a diversity agenda
  • Develop strategies for overcoming environmental hurdles and navigating the academic infrastructure
  • Recruit and retain a diverse faculty
  • Enhance diversity learning outcomes and student identity development
  • Develop a department or program diversity strategic plan

This community is primarily for department chairs and program directors, but other faculty member who are interested in promoting an inclusive learning environment would also benefit from this learning community.

Borrow this book from the Center library.

 

Fall 2016

Intersectionality in action: A guide to faculty and campus leaders for creating inclusive classrooms and institutions
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
16FQ-17WQ

There has been much public debate recently on how to create a campus culture where all members feel included and supported. Brooke Barnett and Peter Felten have collected eleven essays into one learned guide for faculty and campus leaders in their efforts to create inclusive classrooms and institutions that do more than celebrate cultural difference and discourage intolerance of others.

This groundbreaking book aims to help readers, no matter what position they occupy on campus, develop the knowledge and capacities necessary to do this essential work and is premised on the understanding that identity, oppression, power, and marginalization cannot be addressed by looking solely at single identities.

In this three-session Faculty Learning Community facilitated by Natasha Martin (Associate Vice President for Institutional Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer) over fall and winter, we will progress through topics of intersectionality and 1) the recruitment and retention of students, faculty, and staff; 2) the development of inclusive leaders, governing bodies, and advisory boards; 3) the campus environment; and 4) the larger world.

Over the four sessions, this book and our discussions will help you:

  • Understand the multi-dimensional nature of intersectionality as a concept of identity formation;
  • Develop campus leaders and structures that sustain an inclusive campus community;
  • Create opportunities for civic engagement that are inclusive and transformative; and
  • Link how working at the intersections of identity can lead to a more just and humane world.

This community is for any faculty member or academic leader who wishes to explore means of creating a more welcoming and inclusive campus environment using the lens of intersectionality.

Intersectionality in Action is just 140 pages long, and reading will be split across the three sessions to be manageable for participants.

 

Borrow this book from the Center library.

The New Academic: A Strategic Handbook
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
16FQ-17WQ

Are you interested in learning about the culture of academia and how to be a more effective faculty member, but are not sure where to begin? Shelda Debowski’s The New Academic: A Strategic Handbook provides a guide for those new(-ish) to academe on how to develop an engaging and productive career as a faculty member.

In this four-session Learning Community facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller (Center for Faculty Development) over fall and winter, you'll work your way through the chapters in the book so that you feel better prepared to fulfill the various roles—colleague, teacher, scholar, disciplinary expert, public professional—expected of a new academic. 

Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

  • Get started - or reboot - as an academic
  • Make a difference as an effective teacher
  • Build an effective research track record
  • Learn how to engage effectively with the public
  • Advance your career in an academic setting

This community is for any faculty member who is in the early stage of her/his academic career.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Borrow this book from the Center library.

Find out more about "faculty learning communities" and find out about the Center's current FLC offerings.

Atmospheric pressure: Post-sabbatical strategies for successful re-entry
Wed, Nov 9 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

Academic transitions, such as re-entering university life after a sabbatical, are often times of uncertainly and stress for faculty. Returning to one’s regular university routine following months of unscheduled freedom to focus on research, course redesign, and exploring new areas of interest can be jarring and sometimes daunting in terms of increased work expectations and social interactions with students and colleagues.

During this roundtable discussion, you will have an opportunity to reflect on this period of life and to share with others how you perceived your re-entry transition as well as offering some of the professional and personal strategies that enabled you to make this transition meaningful and productive. You’ll also be able to make suggestions about the kinds of pre- and post-sabbatical faculty development work that would ease your experience next time around.

 

The short straw? Pros and cons of becoming a department chair
PANEL DISCUSSION
Tue, Nov 1 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

Might your future involve a stint as a department chair or a program director? If so, do you look forward to taking on this role or dread it like the plague? In this frank Q&A discussion, you’ll meet a panel of former and current chairs and directors to discover what these roles entail and how they can contribute to the smooth functioning of your area and the university. Learn about some of the possible pitfalls and hidden pleasures of chairing to help you figure out whether, for you, this really would be the short straw or a rewarding opportunity.

Request a consultation on this topic.

 

Mastering academic time management
NCFDD WEBINAR
Tue, Oct 18 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
NCFDD Presenter: Mindi Thompson; SU Hosts: David Green & Jacquelyn Miller

New faculty members commonly describe:

  • Working long hours but making little progress on their research and writing
  • A sense of loneliness that stems from limited mentoring and community
  • Feeling unsupported in their desire for work-family balance and without the skills to achieve it
  • Wondering whether the academic path is the right career choice

This webinar is specifically designed to address these issues and provide participants with concrete skills to successfully transition from graduate student to professor. Specifically, participants will learn:

  • The three biggest mistakes that new faculty make in managing their time
  • Why and how to align work time with institutional and personal priorities
  • How to create time for academic writing and research
  • How to organize a network of support and accountability for writing productivity and balance

Request a consultation on this topic.

 

2015-16

Spring 2016

Microaggressions, micro-resistance, and ally development in the academy
NCFDD WEBINAR
Wed, May 11 | 12:30–1:50 | STCN 130 | Lunch provided
NCFDD Presenters: Cynthia Ganote, Floyd Cheung, Tasha Souza | SU Hosts: David Green & Jacquelyn Miller
In response to the climate survey

Microaggressions are those little jabs – comments, gestures, vocalizations – that can get under the skin and can have a hostile or toxic impact on the environment so that individuals feel threatened or uncomfortable.

We more often talk about them when discussing ways to lead difficult dialogues among our students, and even ways to serve as allies to students experiencing classroom-based microaggressions. However, what do we do when we witness colleagues who are the targets of microaggressions?

This webinar will examine ways in which microaggressions particularly impact women, faculty and staff of color, and LGBTQ faculty and staff in our institutions. In response, we can practice forms of micro-resistance and ally behaviors when we see our colleagues targeted, or when we ourselves are targeted. This focus on empowerment allows us to take action in our local environments, thereby lessening the impact upon colleagues and ourselves when microaggressions occur.

About the NCFDD presenters:

Dr. Cynthia Ganote is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Saint Mary’s College of California in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her research focuses on race, class, gender, and sexual inequalities; feminist methods (including grounded theory and feminist in-depth interviews); critical and feminist pedagogies; and on approaches to community-based research. Currently, she is writing a book entitled Diverse Faculty, Re-Shaping the Professoriate.

Dr. Floyd Cheung directs the Sherrerd Center for Teaching and Learning and teaches English language and literature and American studies at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. He is also a member of the Five College Asian/Pacific/American Studies Certificate Program, for which he served as the founding chair. He has edited books and published articles on Asian American literature from 1887 to the present.

Dr. Tasha Souza is the Associate Director for the Center for Teaching and Learning and Professor of Communication at Boise State University. Most recently, she was the Faculty Associate for Inclusive Excellence for Humboldt State University and a Fulbright scholar at the University of the West Indies in Barbados. She is a consultant on communication and pedagogy and has published in such areas as difficult dialogues in the classroom, discussion-based teaching, instructional communication, and intercultural conflict.

Request a consultation about this topic.

How to maximize your sabbatical: From application through completion
NCFDD WEBINAR
Wed, Apr 20 | 12:30–1:50 | Student Center 130 | Lunch provided
NCFDD Presenter: Peggy Jones, MFA | SU Hosts: Jacquelyn Miller & David Green

While the word “sabbatical” is derived from “ceasing or a rest,” the reality of being on sabbatical could not be further from those derivations. Instead, in most institutions, sabbatical recipients are expected to use their time away from normal academic duties and responsibilities to focus on their research agenda or creative work, with the resultant expectation of a tangible scholarly or creative outcome. While having time away from campus can be wonderfully productive, it can also cause some anxiety or even paralyze productivity.

In this webinar, we will be exploring the above issues, and create positive ways to deal with:
• Discovering what the sabbatical process is in your particular institution
• Developing an application that realistically reflects your scholarly or creative goals
• Planning on how to use your sabbatical effectively and with the most benefit to both the applicant and the institution

Peggy Jones, MFA, is an Associate Professor of Black Studies and Associate Director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Her most recent publication was six essays for the permanent painting collection catalog of the Sheldon Art Museum.

She also has a book chapter in African American Women's Language: Discourse, Education and Identity. She has been a Faculty Success Program coach since January 2014 and has loved every minute of the experience! She loves sharing the skills she’s learned in the FSP Bootcamp in any and every way she can.

Request a consultation on this topic.

 

Winter 2016

Enhancing campus capacity for leadership: An examination of grassroots leaders in higher education
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
16WQ-16SQ

Are you interested in learning how faculty can have a profound influence on the culture of academia by becoming grassroots leaders, but are not sure where to begin? Kezar and Lester’s Enhancing Campus Capacity for Leadership provides a guide for examining the untapped potential of faculty to make a positive difference on their campus environment.

In this four-session Learning Community over winter and spring, you'll work your way through the chapters in the book so that you have a better grasp of the possibilities for and challenges of grassroots leaders.

Over the four sessions, in addition to becoming familiar with grassroots leadership as a field of study, you'll learn how to:

  • Create meaningful change
  • Enhance the campus climate
  • Improve relationships among campus colleagues
  • Enhance the student experience

This community is for any faculty member who is interested in effective grassroots leadership in a campus context.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

 

Pinnacle of the profession: Scaling the heights to full professor
PANEL DISCUSSION
Tue, Feb 23 | 12:30–1:50 | Casey Commons | Lunch provided
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

For many tenure-track faculty, achieving the rank of full professor signifies that they’ve reached the pinnacle of their profession. The process for reaching that pinnacle, however, often feels rather mysterious and perhaps even too daunting to consider.

Meet a panel of current full professors to discover how they successfully achieved this next stage in their careers. Learn about some of the best practices to follow or possible pitfalls to avoid as you consider your own academic path to the heady heights of full professor.

The session also includes a Q&A in a confidential environment.

 

Bully in the ivory tower: How aggression and incivility erode American higher education
NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
February 2, 2016
NCFDD presenter: Dr. Leah Hollis | SU Hosts: David Green & Jacquelyn Miller
In response to the Campus Climate Survey

While workplace bullying has an enormous toll on individuals, workplace bullying can cost colleges and universities billions of dollars.

This webinar will review the cost of employee disengagement to higher education. Further, Dr. Leah Hollis, author of Bully in the Ivory Tower, will offer specific case studies in which the bully created a threat for the organization with bullying behavior (breaking external policies and legislation). Organizational solutions, which emerged from the research, will also be offered to participants.

Leah P. Hollis EdD, is president and founder of Patricia Berkly LLC, a healthy workplace advocate at www.diversitytrainingconsultants.com. Her recent book, Bully in the Ivory Tower: How Aggression and Incivility Erode American Higher Education is based on independent research on 175 colleges and universities. Findings reveal that workplace bullying occurs at an even higher rate in higher education. Her research has helped over 70 schools address incivility on campus.

Dr. Hollis has an extensive career in higher education administration where she has held senior leadership and faculty posts. Dr. Hollis has taught at Northeastern University, the New Jersey Institute of Technology, and Rutgers University. Dr. Hollis received her Bachelor of Arts degree in English and Africana Studies from Rutgers University and her Master of Arts in degree English Literature from the University of Pittsburgh. She earned her Doctorate of Education from Boston University, as a Martin Luther King, Jr. Fellow. Her research interests focus on the healthy workplace and also issues that deal with college athletics, and at risk students. She currently is an assistant professor in the Community College Leadership Doctoral Program at Morgan State University.

Request a consultation on this topic.

 

Fall 2015

The New Academic
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNTIY
15FQ-16WQ

Are you interested in learning about the culture of academia and how to be a more effective faculty member, but are not sure where to begin? Shelda Debowski’s The New Academic: A Strategic Handbook provides a guide for those new(-ish) to academe on how to develop an engaging and productive career as a faculty member.

In this four-session Learning Community over fall and winter, you'll work your way through the chapters in the book so that you feel better prepared to fulfill the various roles—colleague, teacher, scholar, disciplinary expert, public professional—expected of a new academic.

Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

  • Get started - or reboot - as an academic
  • Make a difference as an effective teacher
  • Build an effective research track record
  • Learn how to engage effectively with the public
  • Advance your career in an academic setting

This community is for any faculty member who is in the early stage of her/his academic career.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

 

Presentation Zen
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNTIY
15FQ-16WQ

Presentations are a mainstay of academia: at conferences, on campuses, and in classes. And as we all know, many of them are bad. Really bad.

How can we distinguish our presentations from others’ in a way that truly engages our audiences with the ideas we hope to convey? Garr Reynolds’s Presentation Zen provides potential answers and examples, combining simplicity, storytelling, and good design in a way that helps presentations be “appreciated, remembered, and best of all, acted upon.”

In this four-session Faculty Learning Community over fall and winter, we will progress through the chapters and will each develop or revise an important upcoming presentation of our own. We’ll discuss the sticking points and epiphanies we discover along the way as we experiment with the art of creating presentations that work.

Over the four sessions, this book and our discussions will help you 

  • Take a different – and flexible – approach to creating presentations tailored to their contexts
  • Focus on the story of your message before even thinking about how to present it
  • Devise and design simple visuals that will complement and enrich your ideas, rather than detracting from them
  • Work out how best to connect with and engage your audience during your presentation

This community is for any faculty member who has an important upcoming presentation or who simply wishes to take their presentations to a higher level.

 

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

Find out more about "faculty learning communities" and see the Center for Faculty Development's current FLC offerings.

The Academic Chair's Handbook
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNTIY
15FQ-16WQ

Are you interested in learning how to be a more effective leader of the faculty, staff, and students in your academic department or program? The authors of The Academic Chair's Handbook (Wheeler et al.) provide a guide for department chairs and program directors to develop a reflective and productive career as a faculty administrator.

In this four-session Learning Community over fall and winter, you'll work your way through the chapters in the book so that you feel better prepared to fulfill your current role as the leader of your academic unit.

Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

  • Develop a conceptual understanding of the unique roles and responsibilities encompassed by academic leadership
  • Develop the skills necessary to achieve results through working with faculty, staff, students, and other administrators
  • Develop the practice of reflection that enables one to learn from past experiences in order to perfect the art of leadership

This community is for any current department chair or program director interested in the process of self-improvement as a faculty leader.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

Find out more about "faculty learning communities" and see the Center for Faculty Development's current FLC offerings.

Leaning toward leadership: Faculty administration as a possible career choice
PANEL DISCUSSION
November 3, 2015
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

Does your future involve a stint as a department chair or a program director? Or have you served in one of these roles and are interested in pursuing another faculty administrative position, possibly as a director, an associate dean, or as a dean?

Meet a panel of current faculty administrators to discover what these roles entail and how they contribute to the smooth functioning of the university. Learn about some of the hidden pleasures and possible pitfalls that will prepare you to better serve in these roles.

The session also includes a Q&A in a confidential environment.

Request a consultation about this topic.

 

Fulbright Scholar Program: Informational session for faculty and staff
September 17, 2015
Presenter: Athena Fullay | SU Host: Jacquelyn Miller

This session will be facilitated by Athena Fullay, Senior Manager for Institutional Engagement at the Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES), the organization that oversees the Fulbright Program. At the session you will:

  • Learn about teaching and research opportunities in more than 125 countries
  • Get Advice on selecting countries for application and making contacts abroad
  • Explore how your campus can host visiting foreign Fulbright scholars
  • Get Tips on how to prepare the Fulbright application

If you are interested in learning more about the Fulbright Scholar Program, contact Jacquelyn Miller (University Liaison to the Fulbright Scholar Program).

Request a consultation about this topic.

 

2014-15

Spring 2015

 

Every summer needs a plan
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
May 1, 2015
NCFDD presenter: Kerry Ann Rockquemore | SU Host: Jacquelyn Miller

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

  • Do you often start the summer with high hopes for your writing projects, but end disappointed by your actual productivity?
  • Do you desperately want (or need) to write a lot this summer?
  • Do you want to figure out how to be more productive AND enjoy your life this summer?

Then join us for a hands-on workshop. NCFDD offers this planning workshop at the beginning of each summer so that you can take time out of your schedule to identify your personal and professional goals, create a strategic plan to accomplish them, and identify the types of community, support, and accountability you need to make this your most productive and balanced summer ever!

Request a consultation about this topic.

 

Aligning your time with your priorities
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
April 21, 2015
NCFDD presenter: Kerry Ann Rockquemore | SU Host: David Green

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

In this hands-on tele-workshop, you’ll learn the secret to making your calendar work for you, day-to-day and week-to-week, with a step-by-step guide to holding a weekly planning meeting (also known as “The Sunday Meeting”).

In this session you'll learn:

  • What works and what doesn’t work when it comes to weekly planning
  • Why weekly planning is the bridge between your quarter or semester plan and getting control of your workday
  • The 30-minute technique that will help you make sure that the most important things get done each day
  • And much more...

This is a hands-on tele-workshop where we will not only learn the technique, but we will actually do it! And if you’ve had chance to work on an overarching plan for the quarter or semester, you’ll get even more out of the session.

Request a consultation about this topic.

 

Winter 2015

Putting yourself on the map: Fulbright awards for international research or teaching
PANEL DISCUSSION
February 25, 2015
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

If you are interested in international research and/or teaching opportunities, a Fulbright award is a good way to fund your academic work. At this event, a panel of three recent Fulbright award recipients will share their motives for applying for a Fulbright, insights into the application process, and tips on how to gain the most from your experience as a Fulbright ambassador as well as addressing questions from the audience.

If you are interested in learning more about the Fulbright Scholar Program, contact Jacquelyn Miller (University Liaison to the Fulbright Scholar Program).

 

 

The art of saying no
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
February 17, 2015
NCFDD presenter: Kerry Ann Rockquemore | SU Hosts: David Green & Jacquelyn Miller

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

Are you confused about when to say "yes" and "no" to other people's requests? Do you often say "yes" to requests without realizing the impact that response will have on your time and productivity? Do you find yourself feeling angry and resentful during the academic year because you've said "yes" too often?

You're not alone! Many faculty (pre- and post-tenure) find it incredibly difficult to sort out when, why and how to say "NO." In this tele-workshop, you will learn:

  • The biggest mistakes faculty make in responding to requests
  • How to identify and disrupt problematic patterns
  • Our favorite strategies that you can implement immediately so you can add "no" to your vocabulary

 

 

Atmospheric pressure? Post-sabbatical strategies for successful re-entry
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
February 11, 2015
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

Academic transitions, such as re-entering university life after a sabbatical, are often times of uncertainly and stress for faculty. Returning to one’s regular university routine following months of unscheduled freedom to focus on research, course redesign, and exploring new areas of interest can be jarring and sometimes daunting in terms of increased work expectations and social interactions with students and colleagues.

During this roundtable discussion, you will have an opportunity to reflect on this period of life and to share with others how you perceived your re-entry transition as well as offering some of the professional and personal strategies that enabled you to make this transition meaningful and productive. You’ll also be able to make suggestions about the kinds of pre- and post-sabbatical faculty development work that would ease your experience next time around.

 

 

Fall 2014

Strategies for dealing with stress
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
November 17, 2014
NCFDD presenter: Kerry Ann Rockquemore | SU Hosts: David Green & Jacquelyn Miller

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

The ivory tower of higher education is no longer the idyll of endless time for thought and learning – if ever it was. As with any workplace, it can provoke anxiety and tension on many fronts.

By mid-November, many of us may feel stressed. Others feel devastated when their articles and/or grant proposals are rejected. And sometimes the pressure of work, in particular of publishing (on top of our teaching and service commitments), can make us sick. Just think how many of your friends in academia fall ill over the break and only recover in time to teach their next course.

If any of this sounds familiar and you have difficulty managing the negative energy and rejection in the academic environment, please join us to learn:

  • the impact that stress and negativity can have if they are not managed
  • the most common areas of stress in academic life
  • concrete strategies for managing the physical, emotional, and attitudinal effects of stress

 

Growing into retirement: Senior faculty in the driver's seat
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
November 4, 2014
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

Retirement represents a critical career stage for any academic, but is one that is very often ignored in terms of long-term planning. This “third phase” of your career involves major transitions in identity, community, and economic security. If the idea of retirement has entered your consciousness as an exciting adventure, as a dreaded inevitability, or somewhere in between, then this roundtable event will benefit you.

During this group discussion, you will have an opportunity to reflect on this stage of life and to articulate some of the professional and personal goals that will enable you to make the transition process meaningful and productive. For instance, which areas of your life will give you greatest satisfaction at this stage? What are your greatest worries? Will you want to create a new career path or engage your disciplinary peers through professional service to your field? Or maybe it’s community service or extensive travel that interest you. This roundtable discussion will help you work out how to take control of your new direction so that you feel you’re on the right road.

Request a consultation about this topic.  

 

Overcoming academic perfectionism
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
October 21, 2014
NCFDD presenter: Kerry Ann Rockquemore | SU Hosts: David Green & Jacquelyn Miller

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

When we’ve reached the heights of academic achievement in our fields, it’s easy to fall into perfectionist traps. We might struggle to share our writing at early stages because it’s not perfect; we feel devastated at criticism of our work; we beat ourselves up every time the tiniest thing goes wrong; and sometimes we even find it difficult to celebrate other people’s success because it reminds us of our own shortcomings.

If any of these things sound familiar, then congratulations! You’re a perfectly normal perfectionist.

The only problem is that the nature of the academy is likely to exacerbate our perfectionist tendencies, as opposed to minimizing them.

In this tele-workshop, perfectionists will unite to get clear about:

  • The causes and consequences of excessive perfectionism
  • The features of academic life that intensify perfectionism
  • Strategies to identify when your perfectionism is at work, assess whether it is useful or debilitating, and adjust your standards and behavior accordingly
  • The secret to finding real satisfaction in every step of the writing process

 

 

The New Academic
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
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Are you interested in learning about the culture of academia and how to be a more effective faculty member, but are not sure where to begin? Shelda Debowski’s The New Academic: A Strategic Handbook provides a guide for those new(-ish) to academe on how to develop an engaging and productive career as a faculty member.

In this four-session, facilitated Faculty Learning Community over fall and winter, you'll work your way through the chapters in the book so that you feel better prepared to fulfill the various roles—colleague, teacher, scholar, disciplinary expert, public professional—expected of a new academic.

This community is for any faculty member who is in the early stage of her/his academic career.

 

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

 

2013-14

Spring 2014

Mentoring 101: How to get what you need to thrive in the academy
AFTERNOON WORKSHOP
April 25, 2014
Presented by Kerry Ann Rockquemore

This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

Do you have a reliable and strong network of mentors? Are you struggling to cultivate mentoring relationships? Do you know the difference between a mentor and a sponsor? Are you moving to a new stage of your career and wondering how to find new mentors and sponsors that are appropriate to the next level?

Traditional ideas about mentoring often leave faculty feeling that something is missing in their professional development. In this workshop, guest speaker Kerry Ann Rockquemore challenges the conventional wisdom about faculty mentoring and presents a new framework to help you re-imagine how mentoring works. All participants will map their current mentoring network, identify the pressing areas of need that are not being met, and create a plan to expand their existing mentoring network.

Kerry Ann Rockquemore, PhD, is President and CEO of the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD), of which Seattle U is an institutional member. After Dr. Rockquemore became a tenured professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, her focus shifted from sociology to improving conditions for pre-tenure faculty by creating supportive communities for professional development, writing productivity, and work/life balance. Her award-winning work with underrepresented faculty led to the publication of her most recent book: The Black Academic's Guide to Winning Tenure without Losing Your Soul.

Request a consultation on this topic.

Professional journeys: The trek and its meaning
AFTERNOON WORKSHOP
April 11, 2014
Presented by Robert Conyne, the 2013-14 Boeing-William A. Allen Endowed Chair and Distinguished Professor, College of Education

A "Professional Journey" can be an exciting quest, a slog through bogs, a settling kind of experience, and far more besides. We each experience our own journey as faculty members and tend largely to keep its meaning private, whether it's wrapped in joy or in regret, or somewhere in between. Yet when we are provided with a positive occasion to focus on our professional journey and to be able to share it with peers, experience tells us that much is to be gained.

This four-hour afternoon workshop will intersperse short videos of SU faculty sharing and discussing key aspects of their professional journeys with opportunities for workshop participants to reflect and interact in small groups, guided by a set of carefully developed questions that help illuminate their own professional journey and its meaning.

By participating in this event, you can expect to gain:

  • a deeper understanding of your own professional journey and its meaning
  • a sense of universality, that "I am not the only one" who feels and thinks like this
  • an opening of possibilities for renewal and advancement as a faculty member
  • a sense of altruistic gain through providing guidance to others
  • opportunities to realize valuable experience-based learning

View clip #1: Experiencing your professional journey

View clip #2: Your work style

View clip #3: What advice would you offer?

 

Winter 2014

 

New year, new yes: Learning how mindfulness can help your writing, teaching, and peace of mind
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
February 12, 2014
NCFDD Presenter: Cassie Premo Steele | SU Hosts: David Green & Jacquelyn Miller

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

Mindfulness is a practice of stress reduction that teaches open awareness without judgment and has been known to help with chronic pain and anxiety. In this workshop, you will be introduced to some simple ways to use mindfulness techniques in your writing, teaching, and life. Ironically, the same mindset that sets us up for success as academics can lead to problems over the course of our careers—such as writer's block, lack of connection with colleagues and students, and constant anxiety and self-criticism. In this workshop, we will combine mindfulness practices and journaling to begin to move through these problems.

 


Future-proofing your career: Non-tenure-track faculty in the driver's seat
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
February 5 or 6, 2014
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

This second event in our “In the driver’s seat” series is specifically for non-tenure-track faculty, whether you are working full-time on a multi-year contract, teaching one or two courses a year, or any scenario in between.

How do you position yourself to flourish in a changing national higher education landscape? How do you maximize your talents and find your niche? Becoming “future-proof” means being aware of trends and being better able to position yourself when unexpected opportunities arise. It can bring you a sense of empowerment as you take a more mindful and strategic approach to your own career.

The purpose of this roundtable discussion is to share successes and strategies so that you will be better placed to create an action plan that will help you make your career in the academy more sustainable, meaningful, and rewarding.

Request a consultation on this topic.

 

Difficult conversations
FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITY
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Are you interested in learning how to communicate effectively in difficult situations, but are not sure where to begin? Difficult Conversations, written by members of the Harvard Negotiation Project, provides a step-by-step approach for how to have your toughest conversations with less stress and more success. In this four-session Learning Community over winter and spring, you'll work your way through the principles in the book so that you feel better prepared to engage in important conversations on tricky topics, be they with a colleague, a relative, or a friend.

Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

  • Decipher the underlying structure of every difficult conversation
  • Interpret the significance of what is said — and what is not
  • Raise tough issues without triggering defensiveness
  • Manage strong emotions — yours and the other party's
  • Stay balanced regardless of how the other party responds

This community is for any faculty member who would like to be better prepared for awkward conversations and wants to take a more measured and research-driven approach to broaching the topic. Ideally, you will have a future conversation in mind that you can consider as you work through the book with your learning community of up to 12 people. You may choose to share your topic with the group, but we won't require that of you.

 

Borrow this book from the Center's Library.

 

Fall 2013

 

The short straw? The pros and cons of becoming a department chair
PANEL DISCUSSION
November 5, 2013
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller

Might your future involve a stint as a department chair or a program director? If so, do you look forward to taking on this role or dread it like the plague? In this frank Q&A discussion, you’ll meet a panel of former and current chairs and directors to discover what these roles entail and how they can contribute to the smooth functioning of your area and the university. Learn about some of the possible pitfalls and hidden pleasures of chairing to help you figure out whether, for you, this really would be the short straw or a rewarding opportunity.

 

How to have healthy conflict
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
October 29, 2013
NCFDD Presenter: Kerry Ann Rockquemore | SU Hosts: David Green & Jacquelyn Miller

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

Do you often feel drained by departmental drama? Do you feel unclear about how to handle conflicts that arise in your department? Are you unsure when, where, and how to manage conflict? Academics are notoriously conflict avoidant, and the inability to manage conflict can result in negative physical, emotional, and relational consequences for faculty. So why not learn early in your career to master the SKILL of healthy conflict so that you can effectively manage conflicts as they arise and avoid carrying around all of the negative energy, anger, and resentment in your mind and body.

 

 

2012-13

Spring 2013

 

"Where do I go from here?" Mid-career faculty in the driver's seat
LUNCHTIME WORKSHOP
May 21 or 22, 2013
Facilitated by Jacquelyn Miller & David Green

Research tells us that faculty generally experience greater dissatisfaction during the middle years of their careers. Reasons given for this trend include lengthy professional lives; increased workload; an absence of motivating professional goals; diversified faculty appointment types; and the fact that individuals’ mid-career years are often also mid-life years, which in many cases is a time of reflection and reassessment.

Which areas of your life will give you greatest satisfaction at this stage? Will you want to work on your teaching practices, for instance, or engage your disciplinary peers through professional service to your field? Or maybe it’s community service or academic leadership roles that interest you. How can you take control of your direction so that you feel you’re on the right road?

In this workshop, you’ll have an opportunity to articulate some of your professional and personal goals for the next five years and to create an action plan that is sensible and sustainable. We’ll also consider how department chairs, program directors, and faculty serving on personnel committees can support mid-career faculty in achieving their goals.

Request a consultation on this topic.

  

Academic parenthood: How faculty manage work and family*
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
May 7, 2013
NCFDD presenters: Kelly Ward & Lisa Wolf-Wendel
SU Host: David Green

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

This workshop is based on the facilitators’ longitudinal study of how women faculty on the tenure track manage work and family in their early careers (pre-tenure) when their children are young (under the age of five), and then again in mid-career (post-tenure) when their children are older. The women studied work in a range of institutional settings—research universities, comprehensive universities, liberal arts colleges, and community colleges—and in a variety of disciplines, including the sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences.

In this tele-workshop, the facilitators will provide insights and policy recommendations that support faculty with children and offer mechanisms for problem-solving at personal, departmental, institutional, and national levels.

*NCFDD’s title is “Academic Motherhood” based on the book of the same title by the facilitators; however, NCFDD assures us that the workshop is relevant for academic fathers as well.

 

Every summer needs a plan
HOSTED NCFDD TELE-WORKSHOP
May 1, 2013
NCFDD presenter: Kerry Ann Rockquemore
SU Host: Jacquelyn Miller

Please note: This event is a presented by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). This tele-workshop is accessible on the NCFDD website, under Member Resources. The Center for Faculty Development funds an institutional membership to NCFDD for all SU faculty, graduate students and law students. Click here to find out more about Seattle University's institutional membership to NCFDD, including how to become a member of NCFDD.

Do you often start the summer with high hopes for your writing projects, but end disappointed by your actual productivity? Do you desperately want (or need) to write a lot this summer? Do you want to figure out how to be more productive AND enjoy your life this summer?

Then join us for this hands-on planning workshop in which you’ll identify your personal and professional goals for the summer, create a strategic plan to accomplish them, and identify the types of community, support, and accountability you need to make this your most productive and balanced summer ever.

Please note: To make the most of this workshop, bring your calendar with you.

 

Winter 2013

  

Presumed incompetent: The intersection of race and class for women in academia
CANDID CONVERSATION
February 20, 2013
Facilitated by Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs, Associate Professor, Modern Languages & Cultures and Women & Gender Studies; and Carmen Gonzalez, Professor, School of Law

Seattle University has a higher than average proportion of students from underrepresented groups, yet its faculty profile doesn't yet reflect that diversity. At many institutions, a gap exists between the "ideal" of faculty diversity and the actual experience of underrepresented faculty. Using the example of women of color as an entrée into the topic, this Candid Conversation creates space for an open dialogue about the daunting challenges faced by underrepresented faculty as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education.

Editors of Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs, PhD, and Carmen Gonzalez, JD, will facilitate the conversation. We'll discuss some of the concrete strategies offered in the book to help junior faculty thrive in academia and will hear some of the problems that they encountered with editing a book about difficult issues of the intersections of gender, race, and social class within the Academy.

 

 

Fall 2012

No professional development events this quarter.

More information coming soon; check back again later.