Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Stork, Benedict
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Race is the most enduring issue in American history and social life. Race is a cypher for a myriad of identities, concerns, and political positions in the American imagination. Focusing primarily, though not exclusively, on visual media and culture, the course asks: How does American popular culture, especially since the mid-19th century rely on and foster racialized identities? How have popular racialized images shaped the often invisible centrality of whiteness in the dominant understanding of American identity?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Roth, Tara
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This inquiry seminar will focus on the questions: How does music act as a catalyst for social change? How does literature offer us a unique lens through which to explore the social and historical implications of this? In this course, we will explore the human condition by studying fiction, drama, and poetry in the context of countercultural music, that is, music that is both daring and modern to the time period in which it was created.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Ferrari, Carlyn
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

“What's Going On?” is a course that celebrates the intertextuality between the works of African American artists and asks students to think critically, analytically, and creatively about how they inform one another. The course title stems from a Marvin Gaye song in which he is both lamenting and critiquing the state of society, specific historical moments, and current events. In the same way that Marvin Gaye is singing to specific moments in history, “What's Going On?” enables students to learn about 1960s and 70s African American history and literature by juxtaposing popular music and literary texts.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Cobb, Gerald
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course asks a perennial question in American literature: int what ways does our community contribute to our sense of freedom and to what extent might it limit or focus that freedom. Through class discussion, brief papers, and some literary excursions in the city, we will approach "freedom and community" from several perspectives, including the perspective of a student's overall Jesuit education here at SU.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Ferrari, Carlyn
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

“What's Going On?” is a course that celebrates the intertextuality between the works of African American artists and asks students to think critically, analytically, and creatively about how they inform one another. The course title stems from a Marvin Gaye song in which he is both lamenting and critiquing the state of society, specific historical moments, and current events. In the same way that Marvin Gaye is singing to specific moments in history, “What's Going On?” enables students to learn about 1960s and 70s African American history and literature by juxtaposing popular music and literary texts.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Robinson, Nova
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will explore the Arab-Israeli conflict from 1890 to present. It will chart how the creation of Israel in 1948 altered the political landscape of the Middle East. Using a range of sources—films, poetry, fiction, political speeches, and treaties—the course will compare and contrast Palestinian, Arab, and international responses to the creation of Israel and how those responses have changed over time through periods of war and peace.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Eagles, Lane
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is about the representation of the self in image and text. Students examine the work of artists and writers who were particularly concerned with the representation of the self. We explore why artists and writers at particular historical junctures became interested in questions of self-representation and how their different aims manifest themselves. Artist/writers examined include: Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt van Rijn, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin and Paula Modersohn-Becker.

Comments:

Crosslisted with ARTH-3910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Henrich, Allison
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will allow students to gain mathematical skills useful for citizenship. Topics covered include voting theory, financial math, probability and statistics. In addition, students will learn why quantitative literacy is important for everyone in our society and explore barriers to achieving this type of literacy.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

 UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning

Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

 

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Barclift, Philip
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course explores the development of select doctrines in the history of Catholic theology (including the status of women and the problem of war) in order to show how Catholic theology is frequently shaped by political alliances, philosophical systems, and social biases. We emphasize questions surrounding the humanity and divinity of Christ, the problem of war, the problem of Christian anti-Judaism, the doctrine of the church, the doctrine of salvation, and the doctrine of the Eucharist.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Barclift, Philip
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course explores the development of select doctrines in the history of Catholic theology (including the status of women and the problem of war) in order to show how Catholic theology is frequently shaped by political alliances, philosophical systems, and social biases. We emphasize questions surrounding the humanity and divinity of Christ, the problem of war, the problem of Christian anti-Judaism, the doctrine of the church, the doctrine of salvation, and the doctrine of the Eucharist.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Washburn, Daniel
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

What does the phrase "social justice" mean? In what ways has modern Catholicism assessed and confronted the world's challenges? What contributions have Jesuits and their universities made to these discussions? This course examines the theology behind the mission of Seattle University. It presents the context of Catholic Social Thought, emphasizes the distinctive place of Jesuits within this discourse, and considers ways that Catholic theology might contribute to ongoing conversations on justice. Designed for those with little or no prior introduction to Catholicism, it introduces influential church documents and contemporary voices challenging the status quo.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Washburn, Daniel
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

What does the phrase "social justice" mean? In what ways has modern Catholicism assessed and confronted the world's challenges? What contributions have Jesuits and their universities made to these discussions? This course examines the theology behind the mission of Seattle University. It presents the context of Catholic Social Thought, emphasizes the distinctive place of Jesuits within this discourse, and considers ways that Catholic theology might contribute to ongoing conversations on justice. Designed for those with little or no prior introduction to Catholicism, it introduces influential church documents and contemporary voices challenging the status quo.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Guardiola-Saenz, Leticia
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Jesus-the most famous figure in Western Civilization-left us no writings of his own. Instead, he left the storytelling task to others. So we learn about Jesus only through the stories of others, fascinating stories that make claims about Jesus' supernatural powers, identity, and teachings. In this course, we will hear and examine the stories of the canonical (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) and non-canonical (Thomas and Mary) gospel writers. We will learn how to interpret these ancient stories about Jesus, determine their value in uncovering the historical Jesus, and appropriate them into our own cultures and settings. In short, we will move from considering Jesus in the Gospels to the Jesus in Seattle.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Chan, Stephen
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This is the study of major world religious traditions, such as Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism, with special emphasis on their inter-religious relationship with Roman Catholicism. The objectives of the course are to introduce students to the academic discipline of theological and religious studies, and to understand the tenets and history of Catholic traditions through the dialogical relationship with other religions.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Jaycox, Michael
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course will focus on understanding human sexuality as a socially constructed reality that also implies respect for universal human values. Human experiences of sexuality will also serve as a point of departure for exploring Catholic theological questions about God and spirituality. Students will consider the meanings of love and justice as they are relevant to sexuality in the context of diverse cultures and institutions. Special attention will be given to feminist, queer, and cross-cultural perspectives.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100
Cross-listed with THRS 2011-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Jaycox, Michael
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course will focus on understanding human sexuality as a socially constructed reality that also implies respect for universal human values. Human experiences of sexuality will also serve as a point of departure for exploring Catholic theological questions about God and spirituality. Students will consider the meanings of love and justice as they are relevant to sexuality in the context of diverse cultures and institutions. Special attention will be given to feminist, queer, and cross-cultural perspectives.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Teevan, Donna
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course is designed for students who are wary about religious faith and self-identify as atheists and agnostics, as well as those of any faith tradition who wish to become more knowledgeable and articulate about why they believe in God. Drawing upon the resources of the Catholic tradition, it will examine the challenges posed by the privileging of the epistemology of the natural sciences and the reality of evil and suffering. The Catholic emphasis on the compatibility of faith and reason explicitly undergirds this exploration..

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Matthew Whitlock
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Jesus-the most famous figure in Western Civilization-left us no writings of his own. Instead, he left the storytelling task to others. So we learn about Jesus only through the stories of others, fascinating stories that make claims about Jesus' supernatural powers, identity, and teachings. In this course, we will hear and examine the stories of the canonical (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) and non-canonical (Thomas and Mary) gospel writers. We will learn how to interpret these ancient stories about Jesus, determine their value in uncovering the historical Jesus, and appropriate them into our own cultures and settings. In short, we will move from considering Jesus in the Gospels to the Jesus in Seattle.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Whitlock, Matthew
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

"NT Storytellers: St. Paul" : Paul was the first Christian storyteller on record. But even from the perspective of the earliest Christians, the Apostle Paul and his writings were mysterious and obscure. As Paul traveled throughout the Mediterranean world, he told mysterious stories about Jesus that were composed ad hoc, composed out of the diverse metaphors from the cultures he visited. In many ways, each story was a collage of images collected from the well-traveled highways to the darkest corners of the Mediterranean world. In this course, we will travel with Paul, examine his writings, try to make sense of his mysterious stories and letters, and appropriate them to our modern context by comparing them to movies such as The Matrix and The Truman Show.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Howard-Brook, Wesley
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

The Bible's first book has been used as authority within countless cultural debates throughout history, including: the social roles of women and men, the nature of sexuality, the relationship between faith and science, relationships among the world religions, and many more. This course will teach students reading tools that will enable them to hear and to interpret Genesis, both within its original cultural contexts and within our own cultural contexts today. It will engage elements of history, literary theory, cultural theory, and other disciplines to provide a wide-ranging set of perspectives on this classic text. Students will be expected to analyze a passage from the book using the tools they've been taught.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Arvidson, P.
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. 

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Hung, Wai-Shun
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Fisher, Kendall
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Trumbull, Robert
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Humphrey, Paul
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Ricci, Joseph
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Humphrey, Paul
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Falgoust, Michael
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Christina Friedlaender
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Snelson, Avery
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Snelson, Avery
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Zimmer, Amie
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Imanaka, Jessica
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Moskalik, Janice
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Friedlaender, Christina
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Zimmer, Amie
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Friedlaender, Christina
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Tedesco, Maria
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course is an introduction to Islam as a prophetic religion and a living tradition. It addresses the dogmatic and intellectual development of Islam from its birth to the post-colonial era. Along the way, students will learn about the life of Muhammad as prophet and statesman, Qur'an as a sacred text and a historical document, Islamic religious practices, and Islamic law, theology, philosophy and mysticism.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Lawrence, Beatrice
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Students in this course will explore the way gender is constructed (and deconstructed) in the texts of Hebrew Bible. By analyzing large portions of the text, students will gain understanding of gender assumptions that still play a role in our lives today, as well as the profound distinctions between our contemporary society and the historical and social context of the Bible.  In addition, students will gain language and skills for analyzing gender and identity in multiple contexts.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Lawrence, Beatrice
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the multi-faceted world of the Hebrew Bible. In addition to reading and analyzing significant portions of the biblical text, students will become aware of and engage with important issues in the study of the Bible: the application of various methodologies (historical-critical, literary, theological, and gender-sensitive lenses); the existence of various types of literature within the Bible (narrative, poetry, law); the role of the Hebrew Bible in interfaith dialogue; and the significance of the study of "Scripture".

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course is an introduction to Islam as a prophetic religion and a living tradition. It addresses the dogmatic and intellectual development of Islam from its birth to the post-colonial era. Along the way, students will learn about the life of Muhammad as prophet and statesman, Qur'an as a sacred text and a historical document, Islamic religious practices, and Islamic law, theology, philosophy and mysticism.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Tedesco, Maria
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

We will use a combination of historical, textual, legal, and anthropological approaches to analyze the complex interplay between Quranic exegesis, Islamic religious traditions, gender, sexuality and politics in the Muslim world. We will start with Quranic tenets and traditional precepts on gender and sexuality; we will continue with a study of how classical interpretations were altered by the encounter with the West; and we will conclude with different views and strategies adopted by Muslim women and gay, lesbian, and transgender Muslims around the world.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Suh, Sharon
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

In this course we will consider the many ways that Buddhists have defined and engaged with the "Three Jewels" of Buddhism: the Buddha, the Dharma (the teaching), and the Sangha (the Buddhist community). Using this framework, we will examine doctrines, practices, and cultures in different parts of the Buddhist world in a variety of historical periods and reflect upon the many ways people have lived and continue to live as Buddhists.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Suh, Sharon
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course introduces theories and practices of mindfulness meditation from Buddhist traditions. It explores how mindfulness meditation developed historically in the Buddhist tradition as well as its contemporary manifestations in programs such as Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). Class sessions will involve introduction to the Buddhist roots of mindfulness meditation, the development of mindfulness meditation as both a religious ritual in Buddhist sanghas as well as its secularization in contemporary Western psychotherapy. Thus, the course will explore the differences between religious practices of mindfulness and its secularization. Students will therefore be required to engage in a comparative global analysis of Buddhist mindfulness, the benefits and problems with the secularization of mindfulness, and engage in their own study and practice of mindfulness to examine their own beliefs.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Chan, Stephen
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course examines religion as a social phenomenon and attempts to relate religious organizations to other aspects of social life. Topics to be considered include: belief and its institutionalization, forms of religious organization, religion and social change, processes of conversion, secularization, new religious movements, religion in other cultures, religion and material culture, and the future of religious organizations. This course is organized by guided reading and writing of major anthropologists and sociologists: E.B. Tylor, J.G. Frazer, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Mircea Eliade, E.E. Evans-Pritchard, and Clifford Greetz.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Adejumobi, Saheed
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Empires are often associated with power, and utopia with impossible visions.  What are the global challenges created by legacies of modern imperialism?  How are these reflected in unequal contemporary political and economic relations?  We will explore how African Diaspora intellectual history has engaged with inequality in the discourse of justice.  Under the rubric of empire and utopia, we will explore how freedom and justice, and philosophical and material progress are encoded in African Diaspora narratives.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Schulz, Jennifer
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

How has well-being been represented (in popular and academic discourses) as a thing to be attained in the 21st century? This course will offer a more complex perspective on the lived experience of well-being particularly in an era in which humans face potential catastrophe from myriad sources: environmental, political, social, economic, etc. We will read literary narratives of homelessness (exile, dislocation, refugee-ism, a sense of being estranged or a stranger, etc.) that, simultaneously, locate a sense of connectedness, community, and hope in the midst of such upheaval.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Severson, Eric
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course investigates the philosophical, social and psychological forces at work in the way humans create and deploy monsters to cope with the fear and uncertainty. Using philosophical and psychological resources, and drawing from stories, myths and media, this class seeks to understand and rethink the way strangers are turned to monsters.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Eric Severson
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course investigates the philosophical, social and psychological forces at work in the way humans create and deploy monsters to cope with the fear and uncertainty. Using philosophical and psychological resources, and drawing from stories, myths and media, this class seeks to understand and rethink the way strangers are turned to monsters.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Severson, Eric
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course investigates the philosophical, social and psychological forces at work in the way humans create and deploy monsters to cope with the fear and uncertainty. Using philosophical and psychological resources, and drawing from stories, myths and media, this class seeks to understand and rethink the way strangers are turned to monsters.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Freeman, Bradley
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the core tenets and limitations of the field of postcolonial studies. After drawing on this critical lens to read literature written from the epicenter of British empire, we will turn to later writers who respond to and critique the legacies of imperialism and its concomitant literary traditions. We will trace the emergence of this field in its historical and cultural context, recognizing its productive value as well as potential fault lines.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Moskalik, Janice
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the complexities of education. This exploration encompasses the study of philosophical and historical orientations, purpose of schools, and contemporary and critical issues and trends in schools and schooling. Included is a comparative look at global school reforms and practices and their influence on education in the United States. Service Learning field experience with a minimum of two hours per week through the Children’s Literacy Project is required. This course is taught onsite at the Bailey Gatzert Elementary School, the focal point of the Seattle University Youth Initiative (SUYI).

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Kamerling, Henry
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

All societies have crime. All societies punish. This course will explore the problem that crime and its punishment presents to modern civilization. By examining how different cultures throughout the modern world address the inevitability of crime and punishment students will interrogate the contours of modernity and investigate the relationship between punishment and the formation of modern society. At its heart we will examine what it means to be modern by exploring how it is that the way a society chooses to punish reveals its unique outlook on justice and injustice, rights and responsibilities and its appreciation of mercy and forgiveness.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Phinney, Harriet
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This class examines reproduction through an anthropological lens with a particular focus on the politics of reproduction. By using reproduction as an entry point to cultural analysis we will explore the ways in which reproduction relates to broader systems of power, identity, race, and technology in different cultural contexts around the world.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Hudgins, Audrey
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The course studies the realities of our southern border from a social science perspective and includes an optional short-term study abroad component. It will explore the human consequences of the global forces at work along the border region using a multidisciplinary approach. The course develops in students an educated awareness of the complexity of the border issues facing Mexico and the US and a greater sense of what it means to be a global citizen.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Murowchick, Elise
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Globally, excess female mortality after birth and missing" girls at birth account every year for an estimated 3.9 million women below the age of 60. About two-fifths of them are never born, one-fifth goes missing in infancy and childhood, and the remaining two-fifths do so between the ages of 15 and 59" (World Bank, 2012). In this course you will learn how the social sciences help us understand this current world crisis and why the health of women and children is seen by many institutes as a proxy for the country's health and future prosperity (United Nations, 2012).

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Skogerboe, Kristen
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will introduce the student to the goals, risks and benefits of newborn screening and its application in different cultures and populations. Skills developed will include evaluating scientific literature, understanding basic statistical terms and basics of the genetics of inheritance, correct use of common medical terms and use of reliable online sources for obtaining medical information. Writing assignments will introduce students to scientific editorials, letters and short papers.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

In this course you will investigate the geologic causes, environmental impacts, and societal impacts of global natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, flooding, coastal erosion, and weather-related hazards. The course will focus on the physical processes that cause natural hazards as well as risk factors, prevention, mitigation, and preparedness. Since natural hazards affect all parts of the world, we will be able to compare the effects of similar hazards in different countries.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Liepert, Beate
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will address the issue of global climate change. We will discuss the science behind how humans can affect the global climate--covering the major greenhouse gasses, how they impact the climate, and how the current and projected changes compare to previous climactic and atmospheric shifts. Students will dig into the science behind the "climate controversies," and explain the various lines of evidence for how we know the global shift is already underway.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Liepert, Beate
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will address the issue of global climate change. We will discuss the science behind how humans can affect the global climate--covering the major greenhouse gasses, how they impact the climate, and how the current and projected changes compare to previous climactic and atmospheric shifts. Students will dig into the science behind the "climate controversies," and explain the various lines of evidence for how we know the global shift is already underway.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Pool, Thomas
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

What is cancer, what causes it, and what can you do about it?  In this course, we will explore the basics of cancer biology, the link between genetics, environment, and cancer, and the many treatments for cancer. Along the way, we will discuss issues surrounding environmental and social justice, and the impact of lifestyle on cancer risk.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Brown, Amiya
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This class addresses light as an art form through analytical observations, practical applications, and thoughtful critique. This class builds a foundation of understanding how light exists in our lives by breaking down properties of light into color, quality, intensity, shadow, contrast, and environment. Writing and basic drawing techniques are incorporated as a means of communication.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Colaner, Nathan
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course will focus on questions central to the nature of personhood, including questions about the existence of an immaterial mind and/or soul, about personal identity, about the existence of a free will, about the possibility of immortality, and about the relevant difference between human and non-human animals.

Comments:

This section is for Alfie Scholars only

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Colaner, Nathan
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course is divided into three equal sections. The first section will consist of a critical assessment of the three major kinds of ethical theories, namely, virtue-based, duty-based, and consequence-based ethical theories. The second section will consist of an examination of various topics in applied ethics, including abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, and animal rights. The final section will investigate issues raised by but not explicitly treated in the first two sections, including cultural relativism, objectivism, absolutism, Divine Command theory, the Natural Law tradition, and moral skepticism.

Comments:

This section is for Alfie Scholars only

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Roberts, Christina
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This seminar focuses on elements of rhetoric and argumentation in relation to ecocriticism and sustainability. The course introduces students to the various dimensions of literary and rhetorical analysis, and students are expected to compose various written assignments to engage in conversation with the issues raised within the course texts. The seminar is designed to prepare students to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different viewpoints and express their own views through persuasive and reflective writing.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Kasumi, Naomi
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Students learn and analyze Visual Language and Design Principle through lectures, hands-on studio exercises and projects to demonstrate their understanding of design principle in imaginative, creative ways. Each project will follow a typical design process and color theory from initial idea to project completion.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Hughes Clark, Joanne
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

How did we deduce that the Milky Way is not the only galaxy in the universe? We use the physics of gravity and light to discover the properties of stars, which enabled Edwin Hubble to determine the distance to the Andromeda Galaxy in the 1920s. Soon afterwards, he proved that our home was only one of a multitude of "Island Universes," scattered throughout a vast, expanding cosmos, connecting his observations with Einstein's General Relativity. We use the scientific method to show how stars and galaxies formed, and explore the open questions about the nature of dark matter and dark energy.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Peters, Matthew
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Oliveras, Katie
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to the mathematical ideas behind epidemic modeling and prediction with a focus on logical thinking and epidemic simulation. Topics covered include graph theory (used to represent the spread of a disease in a group), compartmental models, as well as probability and statistics. Computer laboratory sections will provide hands-on experience with building mathematical models to help determine various health policies and resource allocation.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Zhang, Enyu
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

As the world’s two most powerful and important players, the U.S. and the People’s Republic of China hold the key to collectively solving many of the global challenges we face in the 21st century. This course explores this most important and complex strategic relationship through an examination of the basic dynamics of strategic thinking and policy‐making in the U.S. and China and a theory‐informed analysis of key contemporary issues in the bilateral relations, including security, arms control, trade, human rights, energy, and the environment, from a variety of perspectives of International Relations and Foreign Policy Analysis. No prior background on China, U.S. foreign policy, or International Relations is assumed or required.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Whitlock, Matthew
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Paul was the first Christian storyteller on record. But even from the perspective of the earliest Christians, the Apostle Paul and his writings were mysterious and obscure. As Paul traveled throughout the Mediterranean world, he told mysterious stories about Jesus that were composed ad hoc, composed out of the diverse metaphors from the cultures he visited. In many ways, each story was a collage of images collected from the well-traveled highways to the darkest corners of the Mediterranean world. In this course, we will travel with Paul, examine his writings, try to make sense of his mysterious stories and letters, and appropriate them to our modern context by comparing them to movies such as The Matrix and The Truman Show.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Rodriguez, Jeanette
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Latin American Liberation Theology is a dynamic and controversial approach to the issues of faith, human freedom and liberation. We will explore and deepen our understanding of who Jesus is within the lived faith experience of the Latin American reality.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Humphrey, Paul
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Imanaka, Jessica
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Zimmer, Amie
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Chan, Stephen
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Exploration of key issues, as well as appropriate methods, in Christian-Buddhist interchange and reflection. This course will study Buddhist and Christian traditions in terms of their sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices. Students will be acquainted with the philosophical and theological approaches, as well as to the more socio-cultural approach in the field of religious studies. Special attention will be given to the historical encounter of Jesuit missionary works in Asia as case-study of Christian-Buddhist dialogue.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Suh, Sharon
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The relationship between seeing and spiritual maturation are inextricably linked in Buddhist traditions. This course explores the power of religious modes of seeing in the Buddhist imaginary world and the significance of vision and visionary cultures in the transmission and reception of the tradition through the medium of film. This course extends the study of Buddhist practice by asking what can be learned about the transmission and reception of Buddhism when film and gaze are taken as the basis of inquiry. This course thus addresses the following broad questions: (1) How might Buddhist themed films serve as entry points into the imagined world of Buddhism? (2) In what ways has Buddhism been imagined and constructed through the interconnected lenses of Orientalism, nationalism, fantasy, race, and gender? 3) How do spectators engage in religious modes of reception while viewing film?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Dean, Michael
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course examines the rise, rule, and ruin of fascist regimes during the 20th and the history of antifascist resistance Europe, Latin America, and the United States. We'll scrutinize the texts, imagery, and cinema of fascist Italy and National Socialist Germany. We'll also search for parallels to fascism in other parts of the world. Was fascism a pathology limited to European democracies between the world wars, or can the word be used to describe authoritarian movements in other places and times? Is fascism possible today? If so, how do we fight it?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Smith, Alexandra
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course asks students to consider the ways in which, according to Marshall Berman, the city street operates as “the primary symbol of modern life” Students will explore how various texts 1) celebrate the richness of the city street as a space of global contact and 2) use the literary street to push back against attempts to limit access to this potential.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Meyers, Susan
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

In this class, we explore the methods, styles, and ethical dimensions of writing about people and places around the world. We examine both historical foundations and contemporary trends in travel writing, and we practice writing about places near and far. As part of this work, we explore various motivations for travel writing - journey, discovery, politics, storytelling, meditation, commerce, and self-discovery - as well as the ethical complexities that accompany them.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Efird, Robert
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course introduces students to the widespread challenge of achieving both environmental sustainability and social equity. We consider this challenge from a cross-cultural perspective by reading, discussing and assessing a wide variety of both international and local case studies drawn from history and the present day. In addition to reading and viewing case studies, students also engage in hands-on learning in the local community in order to better assess and address local sustainability issues.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
McLaughlin, Sally
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Over the course of history, infectious diseases have been a challenge to humankind around the world. Recent decades have seen the emergence of new infectious diseases that have and will pose new challenges to public health and medicine. The development of drug resistance has also led to the re-emergence of old infectious diseases thought to have been neutralized. In this course, we will address global infectious disease challenges past and present.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Khadivi, Pejman
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The proposed course will introduce major concepts in artificial intelligence and its applications in society, addressing major concerns including ethical issues, security, economical characteristics of AI, and accountability. The course will go through the applications of AI in various areas such as agriculture, science, security, justice, and health, and will introduce AI tasks and algorithms, such as genetic algorithms, neural networks, machine learning, and rule based systems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Skogerboe, Kristen
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Virtually any chemical, even water, can be considered a "poison" at the right dose. Correspondingly, mankind faces a significant challenge to understand toxicology and to take the necessary personal and governmental actions to ensure long term global survival. This course is focused on the global challenges created by poison exposure and is an exploration of the scientific principles and technical advances that are at the intersection of toxicology, medicine, environmental health, law, and ethics.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Joseph, Jaisy
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

W.E.B. Du Bois once claimed that the "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color-line." Taking this proposition seriously, what would it mean to look at the entangled and wounded histories that constitute the US Catholic Church? How might the histories of unassimilable, conquered, and enslaved Catholics challenge the dominant narrative that the US Catholic Church is an immigrant church that achieved full assimilation and Americanization with the election of President John F. Kennedy?

In light of the Catholic vision of unity-in-diversity, this course seeks to examine the multiple wounds that emerge from a recognition of this color-line within the Church and a desire for the healing of broken relationality may better help the Church to respond to Jesus' prayer "that they may all be one" (John 17:21). Whether you embrace the tradition, question its relevance, approach in curiosity, or wrestle with faith, all voices are welcomed and find value in this community of learning.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Rellihan, Matthew
Term:
Summer
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Fall
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Tracy, Hannah
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will develop your academic writing skills by teaching you to write for a variety of rhetorical situations about the complex relationships between politics and media, with a focus on reasoned, ethical argumentation. Through assigned readings and class discussions, we will explore how the news media shape our views of politicians and political issues, and discover ways we can contribute our own voices to the political discourse.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Black, Russell
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

In this course you will develop academic writing skills by practicing a variety of rhetorical situations that engage the complex relationships between the Islamic and Western Worlds. Through assigned readings and class discussions, we will explore the representations of Islam in the news media and popular culture, and discover ways in which we can contribute our own voices and actions to the many issues facing the peoples of the Middle East.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Black, Russell
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

In this course you will develop academic writing skills by practicing a variety of rhetorical situations that engage the complex relationships between the Islamic and Western Worlds. Through assigned readings and class discussions, we will explore the representations of Islam in the news media and popular culture, and discover ways in which we can contribute our own voices and actions to the many issues facing the peoples of the Middle East.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Freeman, Bradley
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

How does television shape our perceptions of everyday life?  How does it encourage us to take on a passive role as consumers of culture?  And what do popular shows--like Modern Family and The Walking Dead--tell us about the cultural zeitgeist and our contemporary moment?  Rather than demonize or simply praise television as basic entertainment, this course draws on reflective, analytical, and exploratory writing to address these questions and our cultural obsession with television.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Packard, M. Wingate
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Our topic is work, with reflection, analysis and research on these questions:  What meanings do we attach to different kinds of work?  How does work affect identity?  How does work shape the worker and the larger society?  What is the context of the minimum-wage debate in Seattle?  What are the conditions of work where the things we "consume" are made, and how do those conditions affect us as consumers?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Gribben, Bryn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This section of academic writing will explore and complicate our relationship to music by writing not only reflective essays about what music means to us but also researched arguments about music in relation to cultural moments and music's effects on our brain.  In doing so, you will learn academic writing skills including: developing a complex questions, considering audience, strongly organizing around points versus mere content, and using sources as voices in your own larger song.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Humphreys, A
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to mathematical ideas, emphasizing a multicultural, or global, perspective to studying quantitative methods, logical thinking, and algorithmic processes.

Standard mathematical concepts are introduced through examples drawn from traditional and non-European cultures. Topics covered include: sona drawing and the Euclidean algorithm; number systems and arithmetic; Sanskrit poetry, Pascal's Triangle, the Fibonacci numbers, and continued fractions; mathematical relations and kinship relations; symmetry and art; randomization, divination, and games.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Neel, David
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Students will learn the essence of quantitative reasoning and understand its importance and applicability in daily life and work. To reinforce problem-solving skills, students will examine and solve algorithmic puzzles and in so doing learn to recognize and apply common Computer Science problem decomposition techniques. Using quantitative data, students will construct and evaluate reasoned arguments in support of problem solutions. Students will organize and analyze data using different representations, noting qualities of accuracy and completeness. Communication of valid reasoning methodologies as well as visual presentation of data in support of hypotheses will be emphasized.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Downing, Craig
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course focuses on the art of putting pictures in motion to tell a story. Students will first explore the history of this art, and then will use film techniques to tell their own stories using found imagery, cell phones, digital cameras and visual and audio editing software. The course goal is visual literacy, as it pertains to the students' ability to both share ideas and to understand motion pictures.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Yurasovskaya, Ekaterina
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

A survey of mathematics used by media, polling agencies, and financial institutions with a specific focus on developing the mathematical skills to be an informed consumer. Topics covered include: percentages, statistics, polling, hypothesis testing, interest, debt, banking, loans, taxes, and budgets.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Neel, David
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Students will learn the essence of quantitative reasoning and understand its importance and applicability in daily life and work. To reinforce problem-solving skills, students will examine and solve algorithmic puzzles and in so doing learn to recognize and apply common Computer Science problem decomposition techniques. Using quantitative data, students will construct and evaluate reasoned arguments in support of problem solutions. Students will organize and analyze data using different representations, noting qualities of accuracy and completeness. Communication of valid reasoning methodologies as well as visual presentation of data in support of hypotheses will be emphasized.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Pham, Trung
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introductory studio course designed to introduce students to Drawing. Developing skills to begin investigating drawing as an artistic medium and method of individual expression.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Wilson, Joshua
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to creative inquiry and expression through the study and practice of key genres in creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Students' principal work in the class will consist of the production of original works in each of these three genres. In support of this work, students will respond to model poems, stories, and essays, and they will engage in artistic discussions about the areas where genres overlap. Assignments will include both written and oral components.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Champion, Tara
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

In this course you will explore digital storytelling and creativity in a range of formats including band-drawn and graphic images, written scenarios, photography, audio, and video. The course focuses on developing awareness of expressive and creative techniques in order 1) to develop craft through emulation of professional norms, and 2) to take creative risks by experimenting with storytelling forms each you find compelling. Planning, production, post-production, and content management methods will be learned in each digital format

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Gutierrez y Muhs, Gabriella
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Cerny, Dawn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is a hands-on exploration of the five major methods of fine art printmaking (relief, intaglio, stencil, planographic). Class consists of technical demonstration lectures, hands on learning exercises, and the production of simple exemplary limited edition fine art prints. Students will be responsible for reading assignments, oral and written reviews critiques, studying prints in local museums and/ or galleries and on campus art venues. A small service learning component will be assigned to one of the printmaking assignments.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Cerny, Dawn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to digital photography designed to teach camera operations, exposure techniques, output and printing, elements of composition and theory. Critical and creative thinking will be demonstrated through the exercise of aesthetic judgment, assignments and class discussion. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, critique, class discussions and weekly slide presentations of noted photographers. Students will be given weekly photography assignments designed around the technical and theoretical information presented in class. Photography will be further contextualized within the larger social, political and historic environment. Students will learn to see photographic works as reflections of the societies in which they are created.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introductory studio course designed to introduce students to Drawing. Developing skills to begin investigating drawing as an artistic medium and method of individual expression.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Venker, Josef
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to the art and craft of handmade letterforms (italic writing) adapted for modern artistic use. Students will learn the formal italic form and variations such as swash, informal, cursive, and instructions for future personalization. Skill will be attained through a series of practice exercises that will then be applied to the creation of finished works of calligraphic art.

Comments:

Adjustable digital camera required

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Carlson, Kristofer
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introductory studio course designed to introduce students to Drawing. Developing skills to begin investigating drawing as an artistic medium and method of individual expression.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Bowen, Jeffrey
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Chung, Erin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Emphasis is placed on developing listening skills, performing skills, and a few useful elements of music theory. Beyond developing basic playing skills, this class will enable students to develop the confidence to make aesthetic judgments, express themselves creatively through the piano and interpret and analyze music.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Arnold, Harmony
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This hands-on studio course offers an exploration of costume design and construction techniques used in costume design for the stage, film, print and photography. Students will experience the world of the costume designer from the designer’s point-of-view through a quarter-long exploration in which they will conceive of designs for a unique historical garments and build each garment themselves. Steps to this project will include design analysis, historical and conceptual research, an introduction to flat patterning and draping techniques, and instruction in hand and machine sewing techniques. Throughout the course, students will move from gathering visual research through collage, to rendering their designs on paper, to learning to put together a three-dimensional sewing pattern, to finally, building finished sewn garment samples they have designed in their entirety.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Joshi, Rosa
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is a hands-on immersion into the collaborative process of making theatre through the lens of the director, introducing basic techniques for telling stories on stage. Through staging scenes, presenting directorial concepts, reading plays and attending live theatre performances, students approach theatre as a collaborative art form and learn fundamental approaches to storytelling through directing, design and performance. Students reflect on and analyze these experiences in written assignments and class discussions.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Roth, Tara
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What does it mean to be a community member of Seattle? How do we express through narrative craft the personal, historical, social, or political ramifications of what it means to live in this dynamic urban landscape? In this course you will read an array of literature about Seattle and the Pacific Northwest and will craft original works of fiction and narrative non-fiction to describe the people and place that is home to our university.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Reyes, Juan
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to creative inquiry and expression through the study and practice of key genres in creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Students' principal work in the class will consist of the production of original works in each of these three genres. In support of this work, students will respond to model poems, stories, and essays, and they will engage in artistic discussions about the areas where genres overlap. Assignments will include both written and oral components.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ART-1000-02

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Gribben, Bryn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

We live in an exciting time for writers, with self-publication on the rise.  What if your writing wasn't just self-expression--what if your voice wanted to join other creative conversations?  How might those conversations require you to reshape your writing in ways you haven't yet imagined?  How can you shape your experiences and feelings in such a way that your writing has to explore new territory for others?  Take the risk--produce creative non-fiction that others will read, beyond the blog.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Codykramers, Dominic
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Put your headphones on and delve deeply into the power of sound in and as art! Experience installations and performances on the cutting edge of music and aural creativity. Learn the basic skills and techniques of generating and manipulating sound to touch the senses and impart emotion, ideas, and meaning. Then integrate what you've learned and experienced by expressing your own ideas through a unique piece of multi-media, sound-focused art.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Adejumobi, Saheed
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course analyzes modern understandings of human rights in light of Global African Studies intellectual traditions and Jesuit/Catholic intellectual traditions.  Introduces students to theories of social movements, African Diaspora history, and historical methodology.  We chart the history of social movements before and since the Haitian Revolution, the Pan-African Congress, and the modern civil rights movement. We will analyze and critique the legacies of various methodologies and social and political theories for modern day social movements.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Kangas, William
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will be an intellectual history of the two movements that stand as the foundation of modern Western thought and culture: the Enlightenment and Romanticism. The goal will be to come to an understanding of the manner in which these two movements articulated competing and alternative visions as to the nature of individual and collective life. In this manner, we should come to better grasp the assumptions and presuppositions that still underpin contemporary thinking about political, social, cultural, ethical, and spiritual matters.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Green, David
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

In this course, you will study the ideas of nation, national identity, and cultural representation by exploring the more than 60-year history of the Eurovision Song Contest — the most watched TV entertainment show on earth. What is a nation? How do nations represent and brand themselves through musical performance? What cultural, linguistic, and historical contexts help explain national affiliations or animosities? And what hidden gems give us clues to understanding national cultures?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Kangas, William
Term:
Winter
Year:
202
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will be an intellectual history of the two movements that stand as the foundation of modern Western thought and culture: the Enlightenment and Romanticism. The goal will be to come to an understanding of the manner in which these two movements articulated competing and alternative visions as to the nature of individual and collective life. In this manner, we should come to better grasp the assumptions and presuppositions that still underpin contemporary thinking about political, social, cultural, ethical, and spiritual matters.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Barda, Justine
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines how movies can engage issues of social justice. By analyzing how movies construct logical arguments, appeal to audiences' desires, and invoke a variety of emotional responses, this course traces the methods by which audiences are transformed into active social participants. Through analysis of films that engage a variety of social justice issues, students in this course will gain an understanding of how moving images wield the power to affect social change.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Tracy, Hannah
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What does it mean to be human? How do we, as humans, interact with and understand one another and the natural world? This course asks you to consider the ways both literary and scientific texts help us think about these and other shared questions. This course will help you see both literary and scientific writing in new ways and to discover how these two fields overlap to express and shape the way we understand our world and our experiences.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Stork, Benedict
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Race is the most enduring issue in American history and social life. Race is a cypher for a myriad of identities, concerns, and political positions in the American imagination. Focusing primarily, though not exclusively, on visual media and culture, the course asks: How does American popular culture, especially since the mid-19th century rely on and foster racialized identities? How have popular racialized images shaped the often invisible centrality of whiteness in the dominant understanding of American identity?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Spencer, Heath
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines the global dimensions and impact of the First World War, from the perspectives of non-Europeans as well as Europeans, civilians as well as soldiers, women as well as men, and home fronts as well as military fronts. In addition to the well-known stories of military strategy and the technology of warfare, it offers new perspectives on the interaction of diverse peoples and cultures in the early twentieth century.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Hume, Naom
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is about the historical role of the artist in society. We look at two moments in history when the identity of artists changed to learn how historical context helps us understand works of art. We ask why Renaissance artists argued that they were intellectuals rather than artisans and why Modem artists attacked the intellectual traditions of art to demand social change and radically question the purpose of visual art. To address these issues we explore themes such as Renaissance self-portraiture, 19th century paintings of labor, symbols of the liberal arts in the Renaissance, and German Dada artists' responses to the trauma of the First World War.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Weihe, Edwin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Stories are the vocabulary necessary to "cultural literacy." We need stories to read with.
Without stories, the world is uninterpretable. In this course, students will explore a story archetype that they will quickly recognize in their own lives. It is the lived story, provocatively told in great films and literature, of our approaching, pushing, and transgressing boundaries.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Malleus, Rick
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course explores constructions of gender, race, class, sexuality, and nation in the recent animated films of Walt Disney. By examining the content of several Disney films created within particular historical and cultural contexts, students will develop and expand their understanding of the cultural productions, meanings, and intersections of racism, sexism, classism, colonialism, and imperialism.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Ferrari, Carlyn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

“What's Going On?” is a course that celebrates the intertextuality between the works of African American artists and asks students to think critically, analytically, and creatively about how they inform one another. The course title stems from a Marvin Gaye song in which he is both lamenting and critiquing the state of society, specific historical moments, and current events. In the same way that Marvin Gaye is singing to specific moments in history, “What's Going On?” enables students to learn about 1960s and 70s African American history and literature by juxtaposing popular music and literary texts.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Koppelman, Katherine
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Do we live in a posthuman (or transhuman) world? Is the category of the human no longer expansive enough to account for all the ways in which we live today? Virtual existences, scientific advancements, and philosophical investigations have pushed us to what some would consider the "limit" of a purely human existence. However, the category of the hybrid, the marvelous, the cybernetic has been a topic of literary investigation for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. This course reads some of those literary texts alongside the concepts of both humanism and posthumanism-interrogating the literary texts for the ways that they frame and respond to the category of the human.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Barda, Justine
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Postmodern aesthetics considers how different cultural, political, and social conditions influence the way we perceive and order reality. We will critique how postmodern art, literature, and culture experiments with language and form to re-frame and alter our sense of meaning, truth, existence, and the self. Our inquiry into postmodern aesthetics will encourage us to think about the challenge and responsibility to create a just world, considering cultural, political, economic, and historical contexts. This course will begin by examining the connections between modern values and the Holocaust and move through the second half of the 20th century. We will read diverse texts like Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, considered to be one of the most important books ever written, and Brett Easton Ellis’ American Psycho, a scathing critique of American greed in the 1980s. In between we will immerse ourselves in provocative texts, including a foray into postmodern-punk feminism. I hope you will join me on an adventure that will stay with you for the rest of your life.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Broussard, Brenda
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Appropriation of Breastfeeding is a 5-credit course designed to be taken for one-quarter of an academic year. The overall purpose of the course is to create culture of health and wellness among the students pursuing degrees in health and related disciplines. The specific aims of this course are to help the students explore personal values and attitudes toward breastfeeding and to hone new knowledge and skills to promote breastfeeding. The course will provide safe and inclusive learning environment in which breastfeeding is examined as a socio-cultural, political, and health construct through structured and direct engagement in diverse course activities.

Comments:

X: ANTH 2120-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Davis, Angelique
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Citizens and interest groups in the United States have effectuated significant societal change through political participation. Accordingly, this course covers the theoretical nature of citizenship in a democracy, exposes the impediments to democratic citizenship, and fosters an understanding of the various ways in which one can participate in the American political system. It examines examples of citizen engagement that may challenge preconceptions about the forms and forums of democratic participation in order to demonstrate to how political science takes civic engagement seriously.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Koppelman, Katherine
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Do we live in a posthuman (or transhuman) world? Is the category of the human no longer expansive enough to account for all the ways in which we live today? Virtual existences, scientific advancements, and philosophical investigations have pushed us to what some would consider the "limit" of a purely human existence. However, the category of the hybrid, the marvelous, the cybernetic has been a topic of literary investigation for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. This course reads some of those literary texts alongside the concepts of both humanism and posthumanism-interrogating the literary texts for the ways that they frame and respond to the category of the human.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Andolina, Rober
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines the construction and consequences of borders across the world. Students develop their analytical, presentation and writing skills as they learn how international boundaries work on local, national and transnational levels. Substantive topics include borderland cultures, collective identities, international order, migration processes, and security policies. Assignments involve written essays, oral presentations, in-depth research, and group collaboration.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Helping others is a multifaceted process. What is the meaning of help and how is it accomplished? Who decides the nature of the problem? What are the impacts of helping on the giver and receiver? What ethical issues and value stances arise? Students will explore the dynamics of helping individuals and communities resolve problems by examining the links between personal and social problems, historical approaches and theoretical frameworks used by the helping professions.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Andolina, Robert
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines the construction and consequences of borders across the world. Students develop their analytical, presentation and writing skills as they learn how international boundaries work on local, national and transnational levels. Substantive topics include borderland cultures, collective identities, international order, migration processes, and security policies. Assignments involve written essays, oral presentations, in-depth research, and group collaboration.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Dharmarajan, Vinod
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The United States is experiencing historically unprecedented levels of income and wealth inequality. This course begins by discussing the measurement of economic inequality, providing students both a historical and global perspective on current levels of inequality in the US. The course then introduces microeconomic explanations for economic inequality, focusing on the labor market. The course examines claims that inequality is detrimental to individual and societal well-being and to the political process. Finally, the course asks what, if anything, can or should be done to address economic inequality.

Comments:

Not for Albers students

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Zimmerman, Nadya
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will examine the systems, institutions, and human relations that constitute postmodern empire. We will consider if, how, and why tools of historical empires--military occupation, economic manipulation, cultural influence, racialized social stratification, and privileged ideological/moralistic rhetoric--might appear in different guises in the postmodern world. In particular, we will investigate postmodern empire in relation to technology, authority, mass media, popular culture/entertainment, debt, labor, work, and history-telling and consider its ramifications in terms of increasing fear of silence, drive for expediency, elimination of risk, anxiousness without constant connectivity, and acquiescence to surveillance.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ANTH 2910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Logan, Alvin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines the mutual ways sport and culture influence one another, we
will collectively consider how sport amplifies, challenges, or ignores issues present in
our culture, including notions of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, gender
identity, abilities, ethnicity, nationality, politics, power, religion, and other topics
frequently examined. The coupling of race, power and sport in course form will
provide a chance to help us shape these intersections by bringing your own
experiences and ideas to course topics.

Comments:

Cross-listed with SOCW1510-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Chaudhuri, Tapoja
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to the complex ways in which environmental factors and human cultures influence each other across the globe. The course adopts a holistic anthropological approach in understanding humans as biological, social, and intellectual beings engaged with the environment around them.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Fortier, Theodore
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines the more than 15,000 year old archaeological record of the Northwest
Coast of North America, the culture area extending from southeast Alaska to coastal British Columbia, Washington,Oregon, and northern California. This region has fascinated anthropologists for almost 150 years because its indigenous peoples have developed distinctive cultures based on fishing, hunting, and gathering economies. The course examines the ecological and ethnographic background for the region, and then study how these have shaped archaeologists' ideas about the past. The contents of sites and consider the relationship between data,interpretation, and theory.

Comments:

Cross-listed with WGST 3910-02
LGBTQ

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Chaudhuri, Tapoja
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to the complex ways in which environmental factors and human cultures influence each other across the globe. The course adopts a holistic anthropological approach in understanding humans as biological, social, and intellectual beings engaged with the environment around them.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Robertson, Mary
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This class provides students with the opportunity to develop a theoretically critical awareness of the relationship between love, sexuality, and marriage from a social scientific lens. The class will explore the relationship between sex, love, romance, desire, and intimate relationships in the modern world through a social scientific lens. Topics to be considered may include: the intersections between race, ethnicity, class, gender, nation, sexuality, and marriage; changing definitions of sexual respectability; prostitution and sex work in different contexts; sexual behavior and sexual ideals; transsexuality and transgender identities; the varieties of love; the meaning of marriage; state regulation of marriage and sexuality; love in popular culture, and historical shifts in constructions of affect and emotion.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Lupino, Ferris
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Citizens and interest groups in the United States have effectuated significant societal change through political participation. Accordingly, this course covers the theoretical nature of citizenship in a democracy, exposes the impediments to democratic citizenship, and fosters an understanding of the various ways in which one can participate in the American political system. It examines examples of citizen engagement that may challenge preconceptions about the forms and forums of democratic participation in order to demonstrate to how political science takes civic engagement seriously.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Lawrence, Charles
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to, analysis and critique of, perspectives on contemporary social issues from conservative viewpoints including: traditional conservative, Evangelical/social conservative, neo-con/liberal and libertarian.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Lawrence, Charles
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to, analysis and critique of, perspectives on contemporary social issues from conservative viewpoints including: traditional conservative, Evangelical/social conservative, neo-con/liberal and libertarian.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Pool, Thomas
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Environmental sustainability gives us an extraordinarily relevant avenue to investigate the question: how do we know what we know about the natural world? We will explore the fundamental biology behind sustainability to better make informed choices about how to live in our only ecosystem, the earth. In lab, we will learn 'hands on' by exploring a question of personal interest using the methods of science as well as visiting environmental sustainability related locales.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Hughes Clark, Joanne
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

How did we deduce that the Milky Way is not the only galaxy in the universe? We use the physics of gravity and light to discover the properties of stars, which enabled Edwin Hubble to determine the distance to the Andromeda Galaxy in the 1920s. Soon afterwards, he proved that our home was only one of a multitude of "Island Universes," scattered throughout a vast, expanding cosmos, connecting his observations with Einstein's General Relativity. We use the scientific method to show how stars and galaxies formed, and explore the open questions about the nature of dark matter and dark energy.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1200
Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Brown, Jeffery
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The nature, formation, and evolution of our Solar System and other planetary systems, and how we learn those, through scientific inquiry. Background physics will be introduced and explored in laboratory exercises and independent observational and computational work. Discussions of the methods, costs, and gains from robotic space exploration, leading up to the search for planets and life elsewhere in the Solar System and the Galaxy.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Hughes Clark, Joanne
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

How did we deduce that the Milky Way is not the only galaxy in the universe? We use the physics of gravity and light to discover the properties of stars, which enabled Edwin Hubble to determine the distance to the Andromeda Galaxy in the 1920s. Soon afterwards, he proved that our home was only one of a multitude of "Island Universes," scattered throughout a vast, expanding cosmos, connecting his observations with Einstein's General Relativity. We use the scientific method to show how stars and galaxies formed, and explore the open questions about the nature of dark matter and dark energy.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1200
Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Pool, Thomas
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Environmental sustainability gives us an extraordinarily relevant avenue to investigate the question: how do we know what we know about the natural world? We will explore the fundamental biology behind sustainability to better make informed choices about how to live in our only ecosystem, the earth. In lab, we will learn 'hands on' by exploring a question of personal interest using the methods of science as well as visiting environmental sustainability related locales.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Brown, Jeffery
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The nature, formation, and evolution of our Solar System and other planetary systems, and how we learn those, through scientific inquiry. Background physics will be introduced and explored in laboratory exercises and independent observational and computational work. Discussions of the methods, costs, and gains from robotic space exploration, leading up to the search for planets and life elsewhere in the Solar System and the Galaxy.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Dominick, Yancy
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Dominick, Yancy
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Moskalik, Janice
Term:
Winter
Year:
202
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Moskalik, Janice
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Dombrowski, Daniel
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course introduces students to the discipline of philosophy in a manner that traces historically the idea that the practice of philosophy can inform a life lived in accord with fundamental truths and intrinsic values. Beginning with the forms of "spiritual exercise" embodied by the ancient philosopher, Socrates, we will follow the Socratic model of inquiry and life through the middle age and into the modern period.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course introduces students to philosophical reasoning through the exploration of some perrenial questions about human nature. Topics will include the role of philosophical reflection in human life, questions about justice, questions about free will and determinism, and questions about equality. We will consider and analyze the perspectives of several prominent figures in the history of philosophy alongside more contemporary perspectives.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Acharya, Vinod
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Acharya, Vinod
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Severson, Eric
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Severson, Eric
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Staff/ Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Zimmer, Amie
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Zimmer, Amie
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
McLeod, Marc
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will examine why soccer has emerged as the most popular global sport and, in turn, what the nature of the modern game tells us about the world in which we live.   We will explore ways in which soccer has reflected as well as constituted social meanings of class, gender, nation, race, religion, and sexuality.  Other prominent topics include imperialism, nationalism, violence, migration, inequality, technology, and corruption.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Friedlaender, Christina
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Friedlaender, Christina
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Dean, Michael
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course examines the rise, rule, and ruin of fascist regimes during the 20th and the history of antifascist resistance Europe, Latin America, and the United States. We'll scrutinize the texts, imagery, and cinema of fascist Italy and National Socialist Germany. We'll also search for parallels to fascism in other parts of the world. Was fascism a pathology limited to European democracies between the world wars, or can the word be used to describe authoritarian movements in other places and times? Is fascism possible today? If so, how do we fight it?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Dean, Michael
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course examines the rise, rule, and ruin of fascist regimes during the 20th and the history of antifascist resistance Europe, Latin America, and the United States. We'll scrutinize the texts, imagery, and cinema of fascist Italy and National Socialist Germany. We'll also search for parallels to fascism in other parts of the world. Was fascism a pathology limited to European democracies between the world wars, or can the word be used to describe authoritarian movements in other places and times? Is fascism possible today? If so, how do we fight it?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Schulz, Jennifer
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

How has well-being been represented (in popular and academic discourses) as a thing to be attained in the 21st century? This course will offer a more complex perspective on the lived experience of well-being particularly in an era in which humans face potential catastrophe from myriad sources: environmental, political, social, economic, etc. We will read literary narratives of homelessness (exile, dislocation, refugee-ism, a sense of being estranged or a stranger, etc.) that, simultaneously, locate a sense of connectedness, community, and hope in the midst of such upheaval.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Veith, Jerome
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the nature of contemporary global violence through a philosophical lens. It mobilizes the concept of historical effect, developed by the German thinker Hans-Georg Gadamer, to assess our present-day situatedness within an ongoing era of conflict, suffering, and trauma. In taking account of our historical inheritance of conflict, this assessment will involve analyzing both the overt narratives and tacit assumptions that frame our conception of violence.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Bourns, Brenda
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Are we on a path to destruction of the planet or is the media reporting hyperbolic claims influenced by hidden agendas? This course will examine 'green' lifestyle choices from two perspectives: the more cerebral understanding facilitated by traditional classroom meetings to discuss the biology behind environmental sustainability and the more visceral understanding afforded by reaching out beyond the classroom to experience first-hand some of the sustainability issues that affect our day to day lives.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Brown, Heather
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

What is cancer, what causes it, and what can you do about it?  In this course, we will explore the basics of cancer biology, the link between genetics, environment, and cancer, and the many treatments for cancer. Along the way, we will discuss issues surrounding environmental and social justice, and the impact of lifestyle on cancer risk.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Lupino, Ferris
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Race is a global phenomenon, but what does it mean to think of race globally? Many studies of race focus on the nation, where race affects the ability to fully enjoy citizenship. This course considers race as a global challenge. We ask how a global frame informs our understanding of race as it relates to citizenship, how the diasporic, oceanic, hemispheric, and global frames clarify the forces that make race, and what do they obfuscate?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Pettinato, Maria
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The course is a critique of American sentimentalism that underlies most motivation for tourism. This critique will focus on the impacts of tourism on the economic, social and cultural life of communities where tourists visit. There will be a focus on ways to minimize the harm, and maximize the benefit, of tourism to these communities

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Spencer, Heath
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course focuses on the problem of genocide in the modern world. It introduces students to definitions, concepts, and theories of genocide; indigenous peoples and colonial issues; the era of the two world wars; and genocide and mass killing since 1945. In addition, students will engage and develop their own responses to questions about post-genocide justice, restitution, and reconciliation.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Fricas, Jennifer
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Students will cultivate awareness of and advocacy skills to address global health and development issues. Includes understanding foundational concepts such as health and human rights, determinants of health, health inequities, and comparative global healthcare systems, as well as investigating specific global health issues. Students will also apply population health advocacy tools to increase their confidence in taking action toward social justice change around global health issues locally, nationally, and internationally.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Aguirre, Robert
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The global challenge this course explores, through dystopian literature, is how desires for social order, and the globalizing philosophies underlying those desires, result in hegemonic forms of social control achievable only through the imposition of ideologies of perfection. Dystopian literature imagines grim worlds where plurality and co-existence are sacrificed for the hegemonic establishment of social harmony. Students will engage and critique these literary landscapes to analyze and assess how global dreams can become global nightmares.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Kamerling, Henry
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

All societies have crime. All societies punish. This course will explore the problem that crime and its punishment presents to modern civilization. By examining how different cultures throughout the modern world address the inevitability of crime and punishment students will interrogate the contours of modernity and investigate the relationship between punishment and the formation of modern society. At its heart we will examine what it means to be modern by exploring how it is that the way a society chooses to punish reveals its unique outlook on justice and injustice, rights and responsibilities and its appreciation of mercy and forgiveness.

Comments:

Cross-listed with SOCW3910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Hawley, Hilary
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

When faced with global issues like social and environmental injustice, how can one person (or a committed few) make a difference? This course will consider the multicultural history and literature of the United States; through examination of novels, poetry, film, and historical documents, we will understand the roots of social and environmental justice and be inspired by models of individual advocacy, then participate in our own advocacy through service learning and a creative, impactful final project.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Lee, Se-Yeun
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will address the issue of global climate change. We will discuss the science behind how humans can affect the global climate--covering the major greenhouse gasses, how they impact the climate, and how the current and projected changes compare to previous climactic and atmospheric shifts. Students will dig into the science behind the "climate controversies," and explain the various lines of evidence for how we know the global shift is already underway.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Gnanapragasam, Nirmala
Term:
Winter
Year:
2022
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

In this course you will investigate the geologic causes, environmental impacts, and societal impacts of global natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, flooding, coastal erosion, and weather-related hazards. The course will focus on the physical processes that cause natural hazards as well as risk factors, prevention, mitigation, and preparedness. Since natural hazards affect all parts of the world, we will be able to compare the effects of similar hazards in different countries.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Alarie, Shayla
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is about the historical role of the artist in society. We look at two moments in history when the identity of artists changed to learn how historical context helps us understand works of art. We ask why Renaissance artists argued that they were intellectuals rather than artisans and why Modem artists attacked the intellectual traditions of art to demand social change and radically question the purpose of visual art. To address these issues we explore themes such as Renaissance self-portraiture, 19th century paintings of labor, symbols of the liberal arts in the Renaissance, and German Dada artists' responses to the trauma of the First World War.

Comments:

Crosslisted with ARTH-2120-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Perez, Alfred
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Over the last 20 years, a critical new developmental period between adolescence and adulthood has started to gain recognition. "Emerging Adulthood" or colloquially known as "Adulting" is characterized by the age of identity exploration, instability, self- focus, feeling "in-between," and infinite possibilities. This course will analyze whether this theory has validity, explore the factors that contribute to diverging developmental pathways, review the typical life of the American 20-something, and uncover the truth behind the stereotypes.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Guerrero, Francisco
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This is an introductory studio course designed to introduce students to painting. The course will develop skills to begin investigating painting as an artistic medium and method of individual expression.

Comments:

Crosslisted with ART-2400-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Gribben, Bryn
Term:
Spring
Year:
202
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This section of academic writing will explore and complicate our relationship to music by writing not only reflective essays about what music means to us but also researched arguments about music in relation to cultural moments and music's effects on our brain.  In doing so, you will learn academic writing skills including: developing a complex questions, considering audience, strongly organizing around points versus mere content, and using sources as voices in your own larger song.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Kasumi, Naomi
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Students learn and analyze Visual Language and Design Principle through lectures, hands-on studio exercises and projects to demonstrate their understanding of design principle in imaginative, creative ways. Each project will follow a typical design process and color theory from initial idea to project completion.

Comments:

Cros-listed with ART-1000-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Reyes, Juan
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to creative inquiry and expression through the study and practice of key genres in creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Students' principal work in the class will consist of the production of original works in each of these three genres. In support of this work, students will respond to model poems, stories, and essays, and they will engage in artistic discussions about the areas where genres overlap. Assignments will include both written and oral components.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Gottberg, Ki
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The power of language is yours to play with in this relaxed and fun acting class.  Because we are meeting online, I have geared the classwork to the medium in which we are working.  We will see some plays online, work with great speeches from stage and life, and read a few scripts.   You will also do some creative writing of spoken word.  You will learn to make language active, which will improve your speaking and writing, and you will learn how to use stage fright to your advantage.     

Comments:

$60 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Castro Luna, Claudia
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course --taught by Washington State's current Poet Laureate --develops a student's ability to “read” the city and to write creatively about urban spaces. Students will read poetry inspired by cities, write poems inspired by the cities they inhabit, and study urban planning to understand the ways that economic interests, public policy, migration, human needs and cultural expressions have created the cities of today.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Lee, Se-Yeun
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What threatens the health of the Puget Sound ecosystem?  This course will focus on the ecosystem of the Puget Sound, the pollutants that can be found there, where they are coming from and how we can prevent them.  Students will do their own investigations on effects specific chemical are having on animal health and how rain gardens and river repair programs can prevent pollution from reaching the Sound.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Sorensen, Jennifer
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

We rely on energy for a variety of daily functions, including heat for our indoor spaces, light, power for electronic devices, and fuel for transportation.  How is that energy produced, what natural resources does is consume, and what are the potential consequences?  This course will use fundamental principles of chemistry to understand how energy is harnessed from natural resources, and will consider the environmental, societal, and economic impacts of our consumer choices around energy.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Lee, Se-Yeun
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What threatens the health of the Puget Sound ecosystem?  This course will focus on the ecosystem of the Puget Sound, the pollutants that can be found there, where they are coming from and how we can prevent them.  Students will do their own investigations on effects specific chemical are having on animal health and how rain gardens and river repair programs can prevent pollution from reaching the Sound.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Humphrey, Paul
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Peters, Matthew
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Ricci, Joseph
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Severson, Eric
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Wirth, Jason
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Cochran, Adrienne
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Robertson, Mary
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This class provides students with the opportunity to develop a theoretically critical awareness of the relationship between love, sexuality, and marriage from a social scientific lens. The class will explore the relationship between sex, love, romance, desire, and intimate relationships in the modern world through a social scientific lens. Topics to be considered may include: the intersections between race, ethnicity, class, gender, nation, sexuality, and marriage; changing definitions of sexual respectability; prostitution and sex work in different contexts; sexual behavior and sexual ideals; transsexuality and transgender identities; the varieties of love; the meaning of marriage; state regulation of marriage and sexuality; love in popular culture, and historical shifts in constructions of affect and emotion.

Comments:

Crosslisted with SOCL 2910-02

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Chaudhuri, Tapoja
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to the complex ways in which environmental factors and human cultures influence each other across the globe. The course adopts a holistic anthropological approach in understanding humans as biological, social, and intellectual beings engaged with the environment around them.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Conte, Soraya
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

How can a city be described as a "social laboratory"? How can people that lived a hundred years ago explain today's social and cultural issues? Beginning with the tum of the 20th Century, students will examine the urban landscape of Chicago, one of the earliest sites of sociological inquiry. Through the lens of Upton Sinclair's historical sociological fiction, The Jungle, we will study the "urban laboratory" that began with confluence of diverse immigrant populations and the extremes of crushing poverty and vast wealth. While many early American sociologists worked with the goal of social reform in mind, these social inequities are still at the heart of sociology today. This course will facilitate a discussion of the both the history of Sociology in terms of research, social thought, and reform and also how the discipline continues to address social injustice albeit in different ways. Students will enter the "social laboratory" that is Seattle and carry out their own service-learning projects in order to ameliorate suffering and also to determine how Sociology has progressed as a discipline.

Comments:

Crosslisted with SOCL 2910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Efird, Robert
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is an anthropological introduction to three social issues that have been the focus of much research, policy and popular interest in the United States: environmental sustainability, racial identity, and gender difference and inequality. In our efforts to better understand these issues (and act upon them), anthropological research offers us a wealth of empirical data and analysis drawn from the richness of our cultural and biological variety and the sweep of human history and evolution.

Comments:

Crosslisted with ANTH 2120-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Armstrong, John
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines the link between social justice and the environment. Social inequities have long been tied to environmental injustices, from access to clean water to industrial pollution, to working conditions, to disaster responses, to climate change impacts. Utilizing a variety of social science approaches, the course examines how to investigate and analyze environmental inequities. Focusing on pressing challenges, it seeks to find pathways toward a more equitable and just environmental future.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Logan, Alvin
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines the mutual ways sport and culture influence one another, we
will collectively consider how sport amplifies, challenges, or ignores issues present in
our culture, including notions of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, gender
identity, abilities, ethnicity, nationality, politics, power, religion, and other topics
frequently examined. The coupling of race, power and sport in course form will
provide a chance to help us shape these intersections by bringing your own
experiences and ideas to course topics.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Lawrence, Charles
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What is "Fake News" and how did we arrive here? Do we live in a post-truth world and is objectivity simply not relevant or possible today? Sociologists study how humans construct their worlds. How do we construct this world? We will look at "fake news," propaganda, examples of intentional deception, self-deception, but also interpretations of the world accepted as fact that are not true, in the realm of politics, science.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Lawrence, Charles
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What is "Fake News" and how did we arrive here? Do we live in a post-truth world and is objectivity simply not relevant or possible today? Sociologists study how humans construct their worlds. How do we construct this world? We will look at "fake news," propaganda, examples of intentional deception, self-deception, but also interpretations of the world accepted as fact that are not true, in the realm of politics, science.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Zimmer, Amie
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Hybrid
Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Zimmer, Amie
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Acharya, Vinod
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Ethics is the area of philosophy concerned with the question of how we ought to live. That is, how should we conduct ourselves and treat each other? How do we determine the difference between right and wrong? In this course, we will explore the nature of morality, the historical and contemporary theoretical approaches to ethics, and several contemporary ethical issues to which our critical lens may be applied.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Friedlaender, Christina
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Veith, Jerome
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Ethics is the area of philosophy concerned with the question of how we ought to live. That is, how should we conduct ourselves and treat each other? How do we determine the difference between right and wrong? In this course, we will explore the nature of morality, the historical and contemporary theoretical approaches to ethics, and several contemporary ethical issues to which our critical lens may be applied.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Severson, Eric
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Sena, Marylou
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course invites students to reflect on philosophy's competing historical conceptions of the human person and their corresponding critical methodological ways of viewing the world. At the center of these competing historical conceptions is the lgnatian problem of desire. The discernment of its nature is central to the whole of this course since the changing function of desire in the soul's historical forms plays an important role in the revolutionary chances defining the historical methodological views and conceptions of the world as spiritual or secular in nature. These conceptions of the world are historically defined as Ancient, Christian, Modern and Postmodern.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Friedlaender, Christina
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Zimmer, Amie
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Peterson, Sven
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Online
Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Acharya, Vinod
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Ethics is the area of philosophy concerned with the question of how we ought to live. That is, how should we conduct ourselves and treat each other? How do we determine the difference between right and wrong? In this course, we will explore the nature of morality, the historical and contemporary theoretical approaches to ethics, and several contemporary ethical issues to which our critical lens may be applied.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Yurasovskaya, Ekaterina
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to mathematical ideas used in the modern world, with an emphasis on quantitative methods applied to life experiences and on developing problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Topics include graphing, exponential growth, financial mathematics, probability, and statistics. Additional topics may include voting theory, graph theory, Fibonacci numbers, geometry, or other mathematical concepts and applications.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

 

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Henrich, Allison
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to mathematical ideas used in the modern world, with an emphasis on quantitative methods applied to life experiences and on developing problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Topics include graphing, exponential growth, financial mathematics, probability, and statistics. Additional topics may include voting theory, graph theory, Fibonacci numbers, geometry, or other mathematical concepts and applications.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Henrich, Allison
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to mathematical ideas used in the modern world, with an emphasis on quantitative methods applied to life experiences and on developing problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Topics include graphing, exponential growth, financial mathematics, probability, and statistics. Additional topics may include voting theory, graph theory, Fibonacci numbers, geometry, or other mathematical concepts and applications.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Meyers, Susan
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to creative inquiry and expression through the study and practice of key genres in creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Students' principal work in the class will consist of the production of original works in each of these three genres. In support of this work, students will respond to model poems, stories, and essays, and they will engage in artistic discussions about the areas where genres overlap. Assignments will include both written and oral components.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Gribben, Bryn
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

We live in an exciting time for writers, with self-publication on the rise.  What if your writing wasn't just self-expression--what if your voice wanted to join other creative conversations?  How might those conversations require you to reshape your writing in ways you haven't yet imagined?  How can you shape your experiences and feelings in such a way that your writing has to explore new territory for others?  Take the risk--produce creative non-fiction that others will read, beyond the blog.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Codykramers, Dominic
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Put your headphones on and delve deeply into the power of sound in and as art! Experience installations and performances on the cutting edge of music and aural creativity. Learn the basic skills and techniques of generating and manipulating sound to touch the senses and impart emotion, ideas, and meaning. Then integrate what you've learned and experienced by expressing your own ideas through a unique piece of multi-media, sound-focused art.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Araujo, Arturo
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is a hands-on exploration of the five major methods of fine art printmaking (relief, intaglio, stencil, planographic). Class consists of technical demonstration lectures, hands on learning exercises, and the production of simple exemplary limited edition fine art prints. Students will be responsible for reading assignments, oral and written reviews critiques, studying prints in local museums and/ or galleries and on campus art venues. A small service learning component will be assigned to one of the printmaking assignments.

Comments:

Cros-listed with ART-2300-01
$75 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Johnston, Alexander
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course takes a production-based approach towards exploring the history and development of media works that attempt to visualize “real life” through the documentary film and other non-fiction forms. It examines the many ways in which real world experiences, events, and individuals are represented through visual means, and how these forms shift and hybridize over time.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Hughes Clark, Joanne
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The nature, formation, and evolution of our Solar System and other planetary systems, and how we learn those, through scientific inquiry. Background physics will be introduced and explored in laboratory exercises and independent observational and computational work. Discussions of the methods, costs, and gains from robotic space exploration, leading up to the search for planets and life elsewhere in the Solar System and the Galaxy.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1200
Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Hughes Clark, Joanne
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The nature, formation, and evolution of our Solar System and other planetary systems, and how we learn those, through scientific inquiry. Background physics will be introduced and explored in laboratory exercises and independent observational and computational work. Discussions of the methods, costs, and gains from robotic space exploration, leading up to the search for planets and life elsewhere in the Solar System and the Galaxy.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1200
Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Trumbull, Robert
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Trumbull, Robert
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Moskalik, Janice
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course introduces students to philosophical reasoning through the exploration of some perrenial questions about human nature. Topics will include the role of philosophical reflection in human life, questions about justice, questions about free will and determinism, and questions about equality. We will consider and analyze the perspectives of several prominent figures in the history of philosophy alongside more contemporary perspectives.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Aguirre, Robert
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The global challenge this course explores, through dystopian literature, is how desires for social order, and the globalizing philosophies underlying those desires, result in hegemonic forms of social control achievable only through the imposition of ideologies of perfection. Dystopian literature imagines grim worlds where plurality and co-existence are sacrificed for the hegemonic establishment of social harmony. Students will engage and critique these literary landscapes to analyze and assess how global dreams can become global nightmares.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Hawley, Hilary
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

When faced with global issues like social and environmental injustice, how can one person (or a committed few) make a difference? This course will consider the multicultural history and literature of the United States; through examination of novels, poetry, film, and historical documents, we will understand the roots of social and environmental justice and be inspired by models of individual advocacy, then participate in our own advocacy through service learning and a creative, impactful final project.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Tracy, Hannah
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Why do people sometimes rise up against political or cultural institutions? How do the reasons for and goals of these revolutions change depending on the historical, political, and social contexts in which they take place? How can previous revolutions help us understand and/or problematize recent revolutions? How can a revolution be a force for social justice? This course asks you to consider these questions through the lens of literary texts that respond to and help incite political and social revolutions. You will develop insights into revolution as a global phenomenon with shared foundations but markedly different manifestations. This course emphasizes the complex ways different cultures are interconnected through their revolutionary literatures and their responses to oppressive governance and social structures.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Aguirre, Robert
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The global challenge this course explores, through dystopian literature, is how desires for social order, and the globalizing philosophies underlying those desires, result in hegemonic forms of social control achievable only through the imposition of ideologies of perfection. Dystopian literature imagines grim worlds where plurality and co-existence are sacrificed for the hegemonic establishment of social harmony. Students will engage and critique these literary landscapes to analyze and assess how global dreams can become global nightmares.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Moskalik, Janice
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Ethical issues arise in a variety of contexts. In this course, we begin with a study of the main Western moral theories, then explore a sampling of arguments regarding particular ethical issues in health care, then consider ethical dimensions of particular cases that raise ethical issues in health care. Ultimately, this course aims to help you further develop your own understanding of ethics.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Moskalik, Janice
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Ethical issues arise in a variety of contexts. In this course, we begin with a study of the main Western moral theories, then explore a sampling of arguments regarding particular ethical issues in health care, then consider ethical dimensions of particular cases that raise ethical issues in health care. Ultimately, this course aims to help you further develop your own understanding of ethics.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
C
AST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Friedlaender, Christina
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Schulz, Jennifer
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

How has well-being been represented (in popular and academic discourses) as a thing to be attained in the 21st century? This course will offer a more complex perspective on the lived experience of well-being particularly in an era in which humans face potential catastrophe from myriad sources: environmental, political, social, economic, etc. We will read literary narratives of homelessness (exile, dislocation, refugee-ism, a sense of being estranged or a stranger, etc.) that, simultaneously, locate a sense of connectedness, community, and hope in the midst of such upheaval.

Comments:

Crosslisted with IDLS 3910-01
WGST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Kamerling, Henry
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

All societies have crime. All societies punish. This course will explore the problem that crime and its punishment presents to modern civilization. By examining how different cultures throughout the modern world address the inevitability of crime and punishment students will interrogate the contours of modernity and investigate the relationship between punishment and the formation of modern society. At its heart we will examine what it means to be modern by exploring how it is that the way a society chooses to punish reveals its unique outlook on justice and injustice, rights and responsibilities and its appreciation of mercy and forgiveness.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Zhang, Enyu
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

As the world’s two most powerful and important players, the U.S. and the People’s Republic of China hold the key to collectively solving many of the global challenges we face in the 21st century. This course explores this most important and complex strategic relationship through an examination of the basic dynamics of strategic thinking and policy‐making in the U.S. and China and a theory‐informed analysis of key contemporary issues in the bilateral relations, including security, arms control, trade, human rights, energy, and the environment, from a variety of perspectives of International Relations and Foreign Policy Analysis. No prior background on China, U.S. foreign policy, or International Relations is assumed or required.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Adejumobi, Saheed
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Empires are often associated with power, and utopia with impossible visions.  What are the global challenges created by legacies of modern imperialism?  How are these reflected in unequal contemporary political and economic relations?  We will explore how African Diaspora intellectual history has engaged with inequality in the discourse of justice.  Under the rubric of empire and utopia, we will explore how freedom and justice, and philosophical and material progress are encoded in African Diaspora narratives.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Schulz, Jennifer
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Trauma is a prevalent mode of remembering and writing history in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. What can literature of trauma teach us about the experience of bearing witness to, and giving testimonies of, trauma? As a Humanities and Global Challenges core course, we will foreground the close-textual analysis of literary texts in conversation with the historical, political, legal, and ideological contexts in which and about which they were written. Our focus on the literary representations of trauma will depend on what I consider to be the other major "text" of the course: students' work with organizations that support war veterans, refugees, and the homeless in the context of Service Learning.

Comments:

Crosslisted with IDLS 3200-01
WGST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Webster, Jennifer
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course starts with a study of the UNESCO charter on world heritage sites, which represents sites of both tangible and non-tangible heritage for the world. Then we will study the historical and contemporary conditions of some of these sites in all continents. At the end of the course, we will go back to the UNESCO charter in light of everything students have learned, to re-examine the global challenges regarding cultural heritage. Covered topics include the selection criteria for the world heritage sites and procedures of campaigns for the selection of sites, as well as the aftermaths of the selection of the sites.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Webster, Jennifer
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course starts with a study of the UNESCO charter on world heritage sites, which represents sites of both tangible and non-tangible heritage for the world. Then we will study the historical and contemporary conditions of some of these sites in all continents. At the end of the course, we will go back to the UNESCO charter in light of everything students have learned, to re-examine the global challenges regarding cultural heritage. Covered topics include the selection criteria for the world heritage sites and procedures of campaigns for the selection of sites, as well as the aftermaths of the selection of the sites.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
McGaha, Richard
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will examine U.S. military intervention in the world from 1898 to the present.

Comments:

Fulfills MLSC 2040 Requirement

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

Faculty:
Crowe, Julie
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Whatever one's education, background, or socio-economic status, the advances of science have great implications for the public. However, science has become increasingly specialized, often resulting in a disparity between what the expert scientist knows and what the non-expert understands. This class offers case studies for students to learn about scientific controversies in the public sphere so that they may better understand the dynamic, social, cultural, and political aspects of science.

Comments:

Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Al-Wahish, Amal and Kim, Woo-Joong
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The production of energy that powers human society presents one of the most critical and complex challenges facing the world today. Increasing amounts of energy will be needed as the world's population grows and as the standard of living for billions of the world's poorest people improves. Meanwhile, many energy sources we rely on today are limited, and many cause environmental harm in the form of pollution, hazardous waste, and global warming. Students in this course learn skills to evaluate current and future energy sources based on their technological, economic, and environmental merits and limitations. They use tools and knowledge from physics as the primary, but not unique, mode of inquiry. They emerge as well-informed participants in the civic discussion about our local, national, and global energy future.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Women & Christian Theology
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

An introductory survey of both the process and content of women's theological reflection upon and dialogue with the Christian tradition, in general, and the Jesuit Catholic tradition, in particular. The principal aim of this course is to consider the significance of women's perspective and experience, while reflecting upon theological questions of meaning, spirituality, ethics, values, and justice, in light of the needs of the world.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.