Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Stork, Benedict
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Race is the most enduring issue in American history and social life. Race is a cypher for a myriad of identities, concerns, and political positions in the American imagination. Focusing primarily, though not exclusively, on visual media and culture, the course asks: How does American popular culture, especially since the mid-19th century rely on and foster racialized identities? How have popular racialized images shaped the often invisible centrality of whiteness in the dominant understanding of American identity?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Roth, Tara
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This inquiry seminar will focus on the questions: How does music act as a catalyst for social change? How does literature offer us a unique lens through which to explore the social and historical implications of this? In this course, we will explore the human condition by studying fiction, drama, and poetry in the context of countercultural music, that is, music that is both daring and modern to the time period in which it was created.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Roth, Tara
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This inquiry seminar will focus on the questions: How does music act as a catalyst for social change? How does literature offer us a unique lens through which to explore the social and historical implications of this? In this course, we will explore the human condition by studying fiction, drama, and poetry in the context of countercultural music, that is, music that is both daring and modern to the time period in which it was created.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Cobb, Gerald
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course asks a perennial question in American literature: int what ways does our community contribute to our sense of freedom and to what extent might it limit or focus that freedom. Through class discussion, brief papers, and some literary excursions in the city, we will approach "freedom and community" from several perspectives, including the perspective of a student's overall Jesuit education here at SU.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Koppelman, Katherine
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Do we live in a posthuman (or transhuman) world? Is the category of the human no longer expansive enough to account for all the ways in which we live today? Virtual existences, scientific advancements, and philosophical investigations have pushed us to what some would consider the "limit" of a purely human existence. However, the category of the hybrid, the marvelous, the cybernetic has been a topic of literary investigation for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. This course reads some of those literary texts alongside the concepts of both humanism and posthumanism-interrogating the literary texts for the ways that they frame and respond to the category of the human.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

People and cultures are on the move in our globalized world. How do we understand immigrants and the contexts of these global flows of people? Has globalization brought cultural diversity or homogenization and what are the stakes here? This introduction to academic analysis and argument, through writing projects based on course readings, films, fieldtrips, discussions, and presentations on these controversies, will help prepare students for their academic career and civic participation.

Comments:

Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Robinson, Nova
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will explore how studying history helps us understand the origins and evolution of the unfolding and interconnected conflicts and crises in Syria, including the civil wars, proxy wars, rise of ISIS, and the humanitarian and refugee crises.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Gribben, Bryn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This section of academic writing will explore and complicate our relationship to music by writing not only reflective essays about what music means to us but also researched arguments about music in relation to cultural moments and music's effects on our brain.  In doing so, you will learn academic writing skills including: developing a complex questions, considering audience, strongly organizing around points versus mere content, and using sources as voices in your own larger song.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Purs, Aldis
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course uses the idea of a coup to discuss and study political legitimacy, the transfer of power, and the relation between state, citizen and political change.  The course gives an overview of coups through history before examining the theoretical underpinnings of coups (what makes a coup a coup and when is the concept used incorrectly).  Students will research and examine various coups across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Bowen, Monica
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is about the representation of the self in image and text. Students examine the work of artists and writers who were particularly concerned with the representation of the self. We explore why artists and writers at particular historical junctures became interested in questions of self-representation and how their different aims manifest themselves. Artist/writers examined include: Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt van Rijn, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin and Paula Modersohn-Becker.

Comments:

Crosslisted with ARTH-3910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

People and cultures are on the move in our globalized world. How do we understand immigrants and the contexts of these global flows of people? Has globalization brought cultural diversity or homogenization and what are the stakes here? This introduction to academic analysis and argument, through writing projects based on course readings, films, fieldtrips, discussions, and presentations on these controversies, will help prepare students for their academic career and civic participation.

Comments:

Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Ekaterina Yurasovskaya
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to mathematical ideas used in the modern world, with an emphasis on quantitative methods applied to life experiences and on developing problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Topics include graphing, exponential growth, financial mathematics, probability, and statistics. Additional topics may include voting theory, graph theory, Fibonacci numbers, geometry, or other mathematical concepts and applications.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry
Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Trung Pham
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introductory studio course designed to introduce students to Drawing. Developing skills to begin investigating drawing as an artistic medium and method of individual expression.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ART-1200-02
Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Quinton Morris
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Introduction to Music Theory is a creative Core course designed to increase a student’s abilities in creative thinking and expression through music composition and performance. This class will teach the fundamentals of music by engaging students through group activities and individual performances such as singing, playing instruments, and dance. Students will learn and explore rhythm, pitch and counterpoint.

Comments:

Cross-listed with MUSC-1000-01
Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Jasmine Mahmoud
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What are the arts? What are methods of interpreting the arts - such as theatre, film, music, dance, and visual art - in relation to their cultural, aesthetic, and administrative contexts? Students analyze contemporary arts practices while learning about arts administration history, and community practices, such as staffing, financing, marketing, programming, and engagement. Course assignments include five “art critiques,” an art organization presentation, and a final research-based arts programming project.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ARTL 1000-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to the importance of context for the study of ancient art, particularly how the current physical context as well as the original historical context of a work of art can affect its meaning and interpretation over time. The historical record of ancient artifacts is often fragmentary and dependent upon their modern locations and the history of how they got there. Students examine how the meaning of an object can depend upon its current location and on the history of its use and display. Class topics include art crime, looting, damage sustained by a work of art, the displacement of objects in museums, and the study of "patriarchal" history writing.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ARTH-2110-01
Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is about the historical role of the artist in society. We look at two moments in history when the identity of artists changed to learn how historical context helps us understand works of art. We ask why Renaissance artists argued that they were intellectuals rather than artisans and why Modem artists attacked the intellectual traditions of art to demand social change and radically question the purpose of visual art. To address these issues we explore themes such as Renaissance self-portraiture, 19th century paintings of labor, symbols of the liberal arts in the Renaissance, and German Dada artists' responses to the trauma of the First World War.

Comments:

Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Brooke Gialopsos
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

A seminar-format course that is designed to explore psychological and sociological approaches to deviance and social control in contemporary society. This course introduces students to topics such as: the origins and functions of deviance in society; the institutional production and categorization of deviance; the impact of deviance on personal and social identity; deviant careers; and deviance and social change. Students will explore the literature on deviance and examine portrayals of deviance and social control in literature, film, and popular culture.

Comments:

Cross-listed with CRJS 2000-02; SOCL 3230-03
Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Robert Efird
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is an anthropological introduction to three social issues that have been the focus of much research, policy and popular interest in the United States: environmental sustainability, racial identity, and gender difference and inequality. In our efforts to better understand these issues (and act upon them), anthropological research offers us a wealth of empirical data and analysis drawn from the richness of our cultural and biological variety and the sweep of human history and evolution.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ANTH 2120-03
Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Robert Efird
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is an anthropological introduction to three social issues that have been the focus of much research, policy and popular interest in the United States: environmental sustainability, racial identity, and gender difference and inequality. In our efforts to better understand these issues (and act upon them), anthropological research offers us a wealth of empirical data and analysis drawn from the richness of our cultural and biological variety and the sweep of human history and evolution.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ANTH 2120-01
Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Gribben, Bryn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This section of academic writing will explore and complicate our relationship to music by writing not only reflective essays about what music means to us but also researched arguments about music in relation to cultural moments and music's effects on our brain.  In doing so, you will learn academic writing skills including: developing a complex questions, considering audience, strongly organizing around points versus mere content, and using sources as voices in your own larger song.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Yurasovskaya, Ekaterina
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to mathematical ideas used in the modern world, with an emphasis on quantitative methods applied to life experiences and on developing problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Topics include graphing, exponential growth, financial mathematics, probability, and statistics. Additional topics may include voting theory, graph theory, Fibonacci numbers, geometry, or other mathematical concepts and applications.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

 

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

 

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Gary Perry
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This urban sociology course will explore the emergence and the consequences of wastelands, or polluted spaces, in the urban environment. This academic service learning course will allow students to investigate urban wastelands throughout the urban landscape of Seattle-Pacific Northwest.

Comments:

Cross-listed with SOCL 2910-01
Freshmen/Sophomore standing
Service-Learning

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
O'Laughlin, Logan
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This class provides students with the opportunity to develop a theoretically critical awareness of the relationship between love, sexuality, and marriage from a social scientific lens. The class will explore the relationship between sex, love, romance, desire, and intimate relationships in the modern world through a social scientific lens. Topics to be considered may include: the intersections between race, ethnicity, class, gender, nation, sexuality, and marriage; changing definitions of sexual respectability; prostitution and sex work in different contexts; sexual behavior and sexual ideals; transsexuality and transgender identities; the varieties of love; the meaning of marriage; state regulation of marriage and sexuality; love in popular culture, and historical shifts in constructions of affect and emotion.

Comments:

Cross-listed with WGST 3910-03

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Loren Schmidt
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Science is bringing us technology, can society figure out how to use it for the good of all? This course will explore the fundamental biology behind Biotechnology (DNA, genetic engineering, stem cells, GMOs) to help us make informed choices as is increasingly required in the policy and personal realms. In lab, we will examine cells, isolate our own DNA, and learn 'hands on' by exploring a question of personal interest using the methods of science.

Comments:

Lab fee
Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Loren Schmidt
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Science is bringing us technology, can society figure out how to use it for the good of all? This course will explore the fundamental biology behind Biotechnology (DNA, genetic engineering, stem cells, GMOs) to help us make informed choices as is increasingly required in the policy and personal realms. In lab, we will examine cells, isolate our own DNA, and learn 'hands on' by exploring a question of personal interest using the methods of science.

Comments:

Lab fee
Freshmen/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Donna Teevan
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course is designed for students who are wary about religious faith and self-identify as atheists and agnostics, as well as those of any faith tradition who wish to become more knowledgeable and articulate about why they believe in God. Drawing upon the resources of the Catholic tradition, it will examine the challenges posed by the privileging of the epistemology of the natural sciences and the reality of evil and suffering. The Catholic emphasis on the compatibility of faith and reason explicitly undergirds this exploration.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Michael Jaycox
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course will focus on understanding human sexuality as a socially constructed reality that also implies respect for universal human values. Human experiences of sexuality will also serve as a point of departure for exploring Catholic theological questions about God and spirituality. Students will consider the meanings of love and justice as they are relevant to sexuality in the context of diverse cultures and institutions. Special attention will be given to feminist, queer, and cross-cultural perspectives.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Michael Jaycox
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course will focus on understanding human sexuality as a socially constructed reality that also implies respect for universal human values. Human experiences of sexuality will also serve as a point of departure for exploring Catholic theological questions about God and spirituality. Students will consider the meanings of love and justice as they are relevant to sexuality in the context of diverse cultures and institutions. Special attention will be given to feminist, queer, and cross-cultural perspectives.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100
Cross-listed with THRS 2203-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Jaisy Joseph
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

The Gospel of John records the mission of Jesus Christ as one of coming so "that they may have life and have it abundantly" (Jn 10:10). Yet, we witness the opposite when we see powerful social forces (racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, etc) disrupt and dehumanize meaningful relationships between peoples. In this course, we will explore eight social issues to get at the heart of this contradiction. The first half of the quarter will focus on global relationships under the headings of global poverty, war, and environment. The second half of the quarter will attend to national relationships under the headings of national poverty, healthcare, incarceration, affirmative action, and feminism.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Jaisy Joseph
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

W.E.B. Du Bois once claimed that the "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color-line." Taking this proposition seriously, what would it mean to look at the entangled and wounded histories that constitute the US Catholic Church? How might the histories of unassimilable, conquered, and enslaved Catholics challenge the dominant narrative that the US Catholic Church is an immigrant church that achieved full assimilation and Americanization with the election of President John F. Kennedy?

In light of the Catholic vision of unity-in-diversity, this course seeks to examine the multiple wounds that emerge from a recognition of this color-line within the Church and a desire for the healing of broken relationality may better help the Church to respond to Jesus' prayer "that they may all be one" (John 17:21). Whether you embrace the tradition, question its relevance, approach in curiosity, or wrestle with faith, all voices are welcomed and find value in this community of learning.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100
Cross-listed with THRS 2205-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Leticia Guardiola-Saenz
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Jesus-the most famous figure in Western Civilization-left us no writings of his own. Instead, he left the storytelling task to others. So we learn about Jesus only through the stories of others, fascinating stories that make claims about Jesus' supernatural powers, identity, and teachings. In this course, we will hear and examine the stories of the canonical (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) and non-canonical (Thomas and Mary) gospel writers. We will learn how to interpret these ancient stories about Jesus, determine their value in uncovering the historical Jesus, and appropriate them into our own cultures and settings. In short, we will move from considering Jesus in the Gospels to the Jesus in Seattle.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Philip Barclift
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course explores the development of select doctrines in the history of Catholic theology (including the status of women and the problem of war) in order to show how Catholic theology is frequently shaped by political alliances, philosophical systems, and social biases. We emphasize questions surrounding the humanity and divinity of Christ, the problem of war, the problem of Christian anti-Judaism, the doctrine of the church, the doctrine of salvation, and the doctrine of the Eucharist.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100
Cross-listed with THRS 2011-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Philip Barclift
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course explores the development of select doctrines in the history of Catholic theology (including the status of women and the problem of war) in order to show how Catholic theology is frequently shaped by political alliances, philosophical systems, and social biases. We emphasize questions surrounding the humanity and divinity of Christ, the problem of war, the problem of Christian anti-Judaism, the doctrine of the church, the doctrine of salvation, and the doctrine of the Eucharist.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Matthew Whitlock
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Jesus-the most famous figure in Western Civilization-left us no writings of his own. Instead, he left the storytelling task to others. So we learn about Jesus only through the stories of others, fascinating stories that make claims about Jesus' supernatural powers, identity, and teachings. In this course, we will hear and examine the stories of the canonical (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) and non-canonical (Thomas and Mary) gospel writers. We will learn how to interpret these ancient stories about Jesus, determine their value in uncovering the historical Jesus, and appropriate them into our own cultures and settings. In short, we will move from considering Jesus in the Gospels to the Jesus in Seattle.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Matthew Whitlock
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Paul was the first Christian storyteller on record. But even from the perspective of the earliest Christians, the Apostle Paul and his writings were mysterious and obscure. As Paul traveled throughout the Mediterranean world, he told mysterious stories about Jesus that were composed ad hoc, composed out of the diverse metaphors from the cultures he visited. In many ways, each story was a collage of images collected from the well-traveled highways to the darkest corners of the Mediterranean world. In this course, we will travel with Paul, examine his writings, try to make sense of his mysterious stories and letters, and appropriate them to our modern context by comparing them to movies such as The Matrix and The Truman Show.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Lynn Hofstad
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

An introductory survey of both the process and content of women's theological reflection upon and dialogue with the Christian tradition, in general, and the Jesuit Catholic tradition, in particular. The principal aim of this course is to consider the significance of women's perspective and experience, while reflecting upon theological questions of meaning, spirituality, ethics, values, and justice, in light of the needs of the world.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Wesley Howard-Brook
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

How does a Christian person respond to the presence of suffering and injustice in the world? The tradition of liberation theology developed to provide tools to respond to this question. This course will explore the biblical and Catholic roots of liberation theology, then look at how it has expanded and adapted beyond its birthplace in Latin America in the 1960s. We will use the "pastoral circle" to engage an experience of injustice or oppression that arouses one's own passion, moving through social analysis, theological reflection, and pastoral planning to discern a personal, practical response.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100
Service learning

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Wesley Howard-Brook
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

The Bible's first book has been used as authority within countless cultural debates throughout history, including: the social roles of women and men, the nature of sexuality, the relationship between faith and science, relationships among the world religions, and many more. This course will teach students reading tools that will enable them to hear and to interpret Genesis, both within its original cultural contexts and within our own cultural contexts today. It will engage elements of history, literary theory, cultural theory, and other disciplines to provide a wide-ranging set of perspectives on this classic text. Students will be expected to analyze a passage from the book using the tools they've been taught.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Wesley Howard-Brook
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

The Gospel of John is a classic Christian text for understanding who Jesus is and what it means to be his followers. This course offers a range of tools for interpreting the gospel in its own cultural context, in conversation with the Roman Catholic Pontifical Biblical Commission's guidelines, and within the contemporary world. The course includes engagement with historical and literary methods, as well as feminist, postcolonial, autobiographical, and other interpretive perspectives so that students can discover its place in their own lives.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Lynn Hofstad
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course examines how the conversation surrounding the environmental crisis has been shaped by theological understandings of women and their relationship with "nature" and the Sacred. Further, the particular issues faced when addressing the intersectionality of race and gender--specifically environmental racism and climate injustice--will be explored. We will analyze the cultural, political, economic, and ecological influences that have affected the development of theology, as well as explore how science and religion have contributed to the ecological crisis. Finally, we will research how women of faith globally are working constructively toward eco-justice by proposing solutions to the crisis.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Thea M. Wyatt
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

An introductory survey of key theological questions connecting spirituality and the arts, within Catholicism and the larger Christian community. This course will consider how the arts may serve as a vehicle for encounter- with God, oneself, and the world. In particular, it will explore the practice of art-making as a way of knowing. Class includes guest speakers and field trips, allowing us to investigate how artistry informs not only individual faith, but inspires social action.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Thea M. Wyatt
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

An introductory survey of key theological questions connecting spirituality and the arts, within Catholicism and the larger Christian community. This course will consider how the arts may serve as a vehicle for encounter- with God, oneself, and the world. In particular, it will explore the practice of art-making as a way of knowing. Class includes guest speakers and field trips, allowing us to investigate how artistry informs not only individual faith, but inspires social action.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
P. Sven Arvidson
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Are you just like every other human being, or are you unique? Most of us assume we are both the same as others and unique. But in what ways, and on what are these assumptions based? Philosophically examining these assumptions may reveal surprising possibilities for the meaning of human life and death, personal identity, freedom and responsibility, reverent respect for persons, and more. To accomplish this examination, this course uses primary philosophical sources spanning from ancient times to present. This course also introduces you to logic and critical thinking.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Wai-Shun Hung
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course introduces students to the methods of philosophy and some of the perennial problems that it deals with, namely those regarding the human person. What kind of being is a “human” person? What does it mean to consider humans as persons? What is our place in the universe? Is there a higher purpose or meaning to our existence? These issues will be introduced in the course using classical, modern, and contemporary sources and different media to promote engagement and self-reflection on the part of students, and the understanding that these issues, while deeply rooted in our intellectual tradition, are still very much alive today.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Douglas Peduti, S.J.
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Marylou Sena
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course invites students to reflect on philosophy's competing historical conceptions of the human person and their corresponding critical methodological ways of viewing the world. At the center of these competing historical conceptions is the lgnatian problem of desire. The discernment of its nature is central to the whole of this course since the changing function of desire in the soul's historical forms plays an important role in the revolutionary chances defining the historical methodological views and conceptions of the world as spiritual or secular in nature. These conceptions of the world are historically defined as Ancient, Christian, Modern and Postmodern.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Joshua Johnston
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Jerome Veith
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course builds on the foundational skills and on the substantive problems treated in Philosophy of the Human Person. In this course, we consider the major ethical theories of deontology, virtue ethics, and consequentialism in application to contemporary issues like euthanasia, abortion, and famine. By understanding the reasons for according human persons a special dignity, the course also provides the context for seeing the central role of ethical discernment in Jesuit, Catholic education.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Jerome Veith
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course builds on the foundational skills and on the substantive problems treated in Philosophy of the Human Person. In this course, we consider the major ethical theories of deontology, virtue ethics, and consequentialism in application to contemporary issues like euthanasia, abortion, and famine. By understanding the reasons for according human persons a special dignity, the course also provides the context for seeing the central role of ethical discernment in Jesuit, Catholic education.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Benjamin Suriano
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Benjamin Suriano
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Nathan Colaner
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course considers both the morally relevant situations a business person may encounter, and the various moral theories that may help inform thinking about those situations. This course includes a sustained discussion of the moral and philosophical elements of the vocation of the business leader, specifically as it relates to three groups: executives and entrepreneurs, managers, and employees.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Nathan Colaner
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course considers both the morally relevant situations a business person may encounter, and the various moral theories that may help inform thinking about those situations. This course includes a sustained discussion of the moral and philosophical elements of the vocation of the business leader, specifically as it relates to three groups: executives and entrepreneurs, managers, and employees.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Janice Moskalik
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Ethical issues arise in a variety of contexts. In this course, we begin with a study of the main Western moral theories, then explore a sampling of arguments regarding particular ethical issues in health care, then consider ethical dimensions of particular cases that raise ethical issues in health care. Ultimately, this course aims to help you further develop your own understanding of ethics.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500
Hybrid
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course engages students in ethical reasoning about central issues in health care, including research ethics, issues at the beginning and the end of life, and questions of justice in access to health care.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Joshua Johnston
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Joshua Johnston
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 2500
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Beatrice Lawrence
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Students in this course will explore the way gender is constructed (and deconstructed) in the texts of Hebrew Bible. By analyzing large portions of the text, students will gain understanding of gender assumptions that still play a role in our lives today, as well as the profound distinctions between our contemporary society and the historical and social context of the Bible. In addition, students will gain language and skills for analyzing gender and identity in multiple contexts.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2100
Cross-listed with THRS 3020-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Beatrice Lawrence
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the multi-faceted world of the Hebrew Bible. In addition to reading and analyzing significant portions of the biblical text, students will become aware of and engage with important issues in the study of the Bible: the application of various methodologies (historical-critical, literary, theological, and gender-sensitive lenses); the existence of various types of literature within the Bible (narrative, poetry, law); the role of the Hebrew Bible in interfaith dialogue; and the significance of the study of "Scripture".

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2100
Cross-listed with THRS 3000-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Stephen Chan
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Exploration of key issues, as well as appropriate methods, in Christian-Buddhist interchange and reflection. This course will study Buddhist and Christian traditions in terms of their sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices. Students will be acquainted with the philosophical and theological approaches, as well as to the more socio-cultural approach in the field of religious studies. Special attention will be given to the historical encounter of Jesuit missionary works in Asia as case-study of Christian-Buddhist dialogue.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2100
Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Callaghan, Jennifer
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of world religions. Religious traditions studied include Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism. In addition to engaging in an overview of these traditions, students will also learn about religious studies as a discipline, and about the methods involved in comparative religion. This will necessarily involve discussions of feminist and post-colonial critiques.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2100
Cross-listed with THRS 3420-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Callaghan, Jennifer
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of world religions. Religious traditions studied include Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism. In addition to engaging in an overview of these traditions, students will also learn about religious studies as a discipline, and about the methods involved in comparative religion. This will necessarily involve discussions of feminist and post-colonial critiques.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Stephen Chan
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course examines religion as a social phenomenon and attempts to relate religious organizations to other aspects of social life. Topics to be considered include: belief and its institutionalization, forms of religious organization, religion and social change, processes of conversion, secularization, new religious movements, religion in other cultures, religion and material culture, and the future of religious organizations. This course is organized by guided reading and writing of major anthropologists and sociologists: E.B. Tylor, J.G. Frazer, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Mircea Eliade, E.E. Evans-Pritchard, and Clifford Greetz.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Maria Tedesco
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

We will use a combination of historical, textual, legal, and anthropological approaches to analyze the complex interplay between Quranic exegesis, Islamic religious traditions, gender, sexuality and politics in the Muslim world. We will start with Quranic tenets and traditional precepts on gender and sexuality; we will continue with a study of how classical interpretations were altered by the encounter with the West; and we will conclude with different views and strategies adopted by Muslim women and gay, lesbian, and transgender Muslims around the world.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Maria Tedesco
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course is an introduction to Islam as a prophetic religion and a living tradition. It addresses the dogmatic and intellectual development of Islam from its birth to the post-colonial era. Along the way, students will learn about the life of Muhammad as prophet and statesman, Qur'an as a sacred text and a historical document, Islamic religious practices, and Islamic law, theology, philosophy and mysticism.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Jennifer Schulz
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

How has well-being been represented (in popular and academic discourses) as a thing to be attained in the 21st century? This course will offer a more complex perspective on the lived experience of well-being particularly in an era in which humans face potential catastrophe from myriad sources: environmental, political, social, economic, etc. We will read literary narratives of homelessness (exile, dislocation, refugee-ism, a sense of being estranged or a stranger, etc.) that, simultaneously, locate a sense of connectedness, community, and hope in the midst of such upheaval.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Aldis Purs
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The End of the Cold War examines the denouement of a bi-polar, ideological world from 1980 to 2005, and sets the stage for the conflicts and challenges of our contemporary world.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Saheed Adejumobi
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Empires are often associated with power, and utopia with impossible visions. What are the global challenges created by legacies of modern imperialism? How are these reflected in unequal contemporary political and economic relations? We will explore how African Diaspora intellectual history has engaged with inequality in the discourse of justice. Under the rubric of empire and utopia, we will explore how freedom and justice, and philosophical and material progress are encoded in African Diaspora narratives.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Eric Severson
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course investigates the philosophical, social and psychological forces at work in the way humans create and deploy monsters to cope with the fear and uncertainty. Using philosophical and psychological resources, and drawing from stories, myths and media, this class seeks to understand and rethink the way strangers are turned to monsters.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Eric Severson
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course investigates the philosophical, social and psychological forces at work in the way humans create and deploy monsters to cope with the fear and uncertainty. Using philosophical and psychological resources, and drawing from stories, myths and media, this class seeks to understand and rethink the way strangers are turned to monsters.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Bradley Freeman
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the core tenets and limitations of the field of postcolonial studies. After drawing on this critical lens to read literature written from the epicenter of British empire, we will turn to later writers who respond to and critique the legacies of imperialism and its concomitant literary traditions. We will trace the emergence of this field in its historical and cultural context, recognizing its productive value as well as potential fault lines.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Janice Moskalik
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the complexities of education. This exploration encompasses the study of philosophical and historical orientations, purpose of schools, and contemporary and critical issues and trends in schools and schooling. Included is a comparative look at global school reforms and practices and their influence on education in the United States. Service Learning field experience with a minimum of two hours per week through the Children’s Literacy Project is required. This course is taught onsite at the Bailey Gatzert Elementary School, the focal point of the Seattle University Youth Initiative (SUYI).

Comments:

Crosslisted with IDLS 3010-01
Service Learning

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Henry Kamerling
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

All societies have crime. All societies punish. This course will explore the problem that crime and its punishment presents to modern civilization. By examining how different cultures throughout the modern world address the inevitability of crime and punishment students will interrogate the contours of modernity and investigate the relationship between punishment and the formation of modern society. At its heart we will examine what it means to be modern by exploring how it is that the way a society chooses to punish reveals its unique outlook on justice and injustice, rights and responsibilities and its appreciation of mercy and forgiveness.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Harriet Phinney
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This class examines reproduction through an anthropological lens with a particular focus on the politics of reproduction. By using reproduction as an entry point to cultural analysis we will explore the ways in which reproduction relates to broader systems of power, identity, race, and technology in different cultural contexts around the world.

Comments:

Cross-listed with: ANTH 4220-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Audrey Hudgins
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

The course studies the realities of our southern border from a social science perspective and includes an optional short-term study abroad component. It will explore the human consequences of the global forces at work along the border region using a multidisciplinary approach. The course develops in students an educated awareness of the complexity of the border issues facing Mexico and the US and a greater sense of what it means to be a global citizen.

Comments:

Cross-listed with INST 3910-02

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Elise Murowchick
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

"Globally, excess female mortality after birth and "missing" girls at birth account every year for an estimated 3.9 million women below the age of 60. About two-fifths of them are never born, one-fifth goes missing in infancy and childhood, and the remaining two-fifths do so between the ages of 15 and 59" (World Bank, 2012). In this course you will learn how the social sciences help us understand this current world crisis and why the health of women and children is seen by many institutes as a proxy for the country's health and future prosperity (United Nations, 2012).

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Kristen Skogerboe
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Virtually any chemical, even water, can be considered a "poison" at the right dose. Correspondingly, mankind faces a significant challenge to understand toxicology and to take the necessary personal and governmental actions to ensure long term global survival. This course is focused on the global challenges created by poison exposure and is an exploration of the scientific principles and technical advances that are at the intersection of toxicology, medicine, environmental health, law, and ethics.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the impact of human population growth on the quantity and quality of water resources. It includes the fundamental aspects of the hydrologic cycle, human water demand, and water conservation. Water pumping and storage systems are introduced. The course also examines the technologies used for drinking water and wastewater treatment with a particular focus on those appropriate for the developing world.

Comments:

Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will address the issue of global climate change. We will discuss the science behind how humans can affect the global climate--covering the major greenhouse gasses, how they impact the climate, and how the current and projected changes compare to previous climactic and atmospheric shifts. Students will dig into the science behind the "climate controversies," and explain the various lines of evidence for how we know the global shift is already underway.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Douglas Faust
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Why did the dinosaurs die out 65 million years ago, yet small mammals survived? What caused the other four great mass extinctions in Earth history? Is there any relation of these past events to current global climate change, which will affect all nations, cultures, and ecosystems? Students in this course will study methods and results from geoscience and physics to learn about the science of climate change, past, present, and future, and the global effects of this change.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Henry Louie
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will address the issue of global climate change. We will discuss the science behind how humans can affect the global climate--covering the major greenhouse gasses, how they impact the climate, and how the current and projected changes compare to previous climactic and atmospheric shifts. Students will dig into the science behind the "climate controversies," and explain the various lines of evidence for how we know the global shift is already underway.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Heather Brown
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

What is cancer, what causes it, and what can you do about it? In this course, we will explore the basics of cancer biology, the link between genetics, environment, and cancer, and the many treatments for cancer. Along the way, we will discuss issues surrounding environmental and social justice, and the impact of lifestyle on cancer risk.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenge
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

In this course you will explore digital storytelling and creativity in a range of formats including band-drawn and graphic images, written scenarios, photography, audio, and video. The course focuses on developing awareness of expressive and creative techniques in order 1) to develop craft through emulation of professional norms, and 2) to take creative risks by experimenting with storytelling forms each you find compelling. Planning, production, post-production, and content management methods will be learned in each digital format.

Comments:

10 Week
Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Nathan Colaner
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course will focus on questions central to the nature of personhood, including questions about the existence of an immaterial mind and/or soul, about personal identity, about the existence of a free will, about the possibility of immortality, and about the relevant difference between human and non-human animals.

Comments:

10 Week
Prequisite: UCOR 1100
MTS: 8/3-9/4; Alfie Scholars only

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Nathan Colaner
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course is divided into three equal sections. The first section will consist of a critical assessment of the three major kinds of ethical theories, namely, virtue-based, duty-based, and consequence-based ethical theories. The second section will consist of an examination of various topics in applied ethics, including abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, and animal rights. The final section will investigate issues raised by but not explicitly treated in the first two sections, including cultural relativism, objectivism, absolutism, Divine Command theory, the Natural Law tradition, and moral skepticism.

Comments:

10 Week
Prequisite: UCOR 2500
MTS: 7/27-8/14; Alfie Scholars only

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Christina Roberts
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This seminar focuses on elements of rhetoric and argumentation in relation to ecocriticism and sustainability. The course introduces students to the various dimensions of literary and rhetorical analysis, and students are expected to compose various written assignments to engage in conversation with the issues raised within the course texts. The seminar is designed to prepare students to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different viewpoints and express their own views through persuasive and reflective writing.

Comments:

1st 4-week

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Alexander Mouton
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

As a Core course, Digital Photography will involve equal parts making images, reading, writing, and analyzing/discussing. Assignments progress on a formal level from B&W to color and then to working with images in time, whether stop-motion or sequenced as short experimental films. The ideas students bring to the projects will be emphasized and the readings, films, image presentations, and discussions will provide direction to explore themes such as consumerism, the environment, gender, social diversity, imagination and dreams. The photographic medium has undergone changes in the last decade at a rate unparalleled since photography's invention during the latter part of the 19th Century. What does digital photography hold for the 21st Century? How is it different from working with film -or is it? What are artists doing within the medium today and what are their influences? These and other questions will be addressed over the course of the quarter as the technical, conceptual and formal properties of the medium are introduced.

Comments:

1st 4-week
Online
Adjustable digital camera required

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Sally Mclaughlin
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Why do some people get sick, while others do not? Why does an individual get an inherited disease, but neither of their parents show any symptoms? Some of the answers lie in our DNA, and how we inherit the genes that help determine our health. In this course, we will explore how our genes shape many aspects of our lives, including a predisposition for many diseases, and what we can do to stay healthy.

Comments:

1st 4-week

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Paul Humphrey
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

1st 4-week
Prequisite: UCOR 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Katie Oliveras
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to the mathematical ideas behind epidemic modeling and prediction with a focus on logical thinking and epidemic simulation. Topics covered include graph theory (used to represent the spread of a disease in a group), compartmental models, as well as probability and statistics. Computer laboratory sections will provide hands-on experience with building mathematical models to help determine various health policies and resource allocation.

Comments:

8-week
Online
Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Patrick Schoettmer
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Citizens and interest groups in the United States have effectuated significant societal change through political participation. Accordingly, this course covers the theoretical nature of citizenship in a democracy, exposes the impediments to democratic citizenship, and fosters an understanding of the various ways in which one can participate in the American political system. It examines examples of citizen engagement that may challenge preconceptions about the forms and forums of democratic participation in order to demonstrate to how political science takes civic engagement seriously.

Comments:

8-week
Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Theodore Fortier
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will look at the way an anthropologist has come to understand the impact of natural selection on who we are as human beings. It will examine Darwin's own passion about racial injustices, which led him into thinking of why there is so much variation in the world. We will examine his original works, the controversies around them, and the manner in which contemporary social scientists and theologians rely on Darwin's premises for understanding human nature.

Comments:

8-week
Online
Cross-listed with ANTH-2910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Matthew Whitlock
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Paul was the first Christian storyteller on record. But even from the perspective of the earliest Christians, the Apostle Paul and his writings were mysterious and obscure. As Paul traveled throughout the Mediterranean world, he told mysterious stories about Jesus that were composed ad hoc, composed out of the diverse metaphors from the cultures he visited. In many ways, each story was a collage of images collected from the well-traveled highways to the darkest corners of the Mediterranean world. In this course, we will travel with Paul, examine his writings, try to make sense of his mysterious stories and letters, and appropriate them to our modern context by comparing them to movies such as The Matrix and The Truman Show.

Comments:

8-week
Online
Prequisite: UCOR 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Jeanette Rodriguez
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Latin American Liberation Theology is a dynamic and controversial approach to the issues of faith, human freedom and liberation. We will explore and deepen our understanding of who Jesus is within the lived faith experience of the Latin American reality.

Comments:

8-week
Online
Prequisite: UCOR 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Eric Severson
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

8-week
Hybrid
Prequisite: UCOR 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Jessica Imanaka
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

8-week
Online
Prequisite: UCOR 2500
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Jessica Imanaka
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

8-week
Online
Prequisite: UCOR 2500
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Joshua Johnston
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

8-week
Online
Prequisite: UCOR 2500

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Stephen Chan
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Exploration of key issues, as well as appropriate methods, in Christian-Buddhist interchange and reflection. This course will study Buddhist and Christian traditions in terms of their sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices. Students will be acquainted with the philosophical and theological approaches, as well as to the more socio-cultural approach in the field of religious studies. Special attention will be given to the historical encounter of Jesuit missionary works in Asia as case-study of Christian-Buddhist dialogue.

Comments:

8-week
Online
Prequisite: UCOR 2100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Faculty:
Beatrice Lawrence
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Students in this course will explore the way gender is constructed (and deconstructed) in the texts of Hebrew Bible. By analyzing large portions of the text, students will gain understanding of gender assumptions that still play a role in our lives today, as well as the profound distinctions between our contemporary society and the historical and social context of the Bible. In addition, students will gain language and skills for analyzing gender and identity in multiple contexts.

Comments:

8-week
Online
Prequisite: UCOR 2100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
Courses that examine religious traditions, spiritual practices and worldviews in a global context. These courses examine diverse religious traditions with respect to sacred texts, doctrines and beliefs, rituals, ethics, and spiritual practices in a global context. Emphases can include the study of a specific religious tradition, comparison and dialogue between religious traditions, and/or applying theological/spiritual perspectives and methods of analysis to global issues. Courses will include explorations of the relationships between religion, society, culture, history, and aesthetics. These courses assist students in applying theological thinking and spiritual reflection to global issues, help them develop understanding of diversity within and between religious traditions, develop facility in dialoging with persons from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, and teach them to reflect on religious traditions outside of one's own.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Susan Meyers
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

In this class, we explore the methods, styles, and ethical dimensions of writing about people and places around the world. We examine both historical foundations and contemporary trends in travel writing, and we practice writing about places near and far. As part of this work, we explore various motivations for travel writing - journey, discovery, politics, storytelling, meditation, commerce, and self-discovery - as well as the ethical complexities that accompany them.

Comments:

8-week
Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Bradley Freeman
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the core tenets and limitations of the field of postcolonial studies. After drawing on this critical lens to read literature written from the epicenter of British empire, we will turn to later writers who respond to and critique the legacies of imperialism and its concomitant literary traditions. We will trace the emergence of this field in its historical and cultural context, recognizing its productive value as well as potential fault lines.

Comments:

8-week
Hybrid

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Thomas Taylor
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course focuses on the problem of genocide in the modern world. It introduces students to definitions, concepts, and theories of genocide; indigenous peoples and colonial issues; the era of the two world wars; and genocide and mass killing since 1945. In addition, students will engage and develop their own responses to questions about post-genocide justice, restitution, and reconciliation.

Comments:

8-week
Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Angelique Davis
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

'Global law' is an ambiguous phrase that is used to refer to different things, such as (1) law in the era of globalization; (2) putative forms of law, such as the lex mercatoria, lex digitalis and lex sportiva; or (3) an ideal for international governance. This class will focus on each of these areas with a primary focus on international public law, generally understood as the set of rules binding the international conduct of states and nonstate actors. Until the twentieth century, international law was largely the law of nations, but today it also encompasses the rights and duties of transnational organizations and individuals. The goal of this course is to give students an understanding of the sources, effects, functions, compliance with, and evolution of 'global law'.

Comments:

8-week
Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Phillip Thompson
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the impact of human population growth on the quantity and quality of water resources. It includes the fundamental aspects of the hydrologic cycle, human water demand, and water conservation. Water pumping and storage systems are introduced. The course also examines the technologies used for drinking water and wastewater treatment with a particular focus on those appropriate for the developing world.

Comments:

8-week
Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Lyn Gualtieri
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

In this course you will investigate the geologic causes, environmental impacts, and societal impacts of global natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, flooding, coastal erosion, and weather-related hazards. The course will focus on the physical processes that cause natural hazards as well as risk factors, prevention, mitigation, and preparedness. Since natural hazards affect all parts of the world, we will be able to compare the effects of similar hazards in different countries.

Comments:

8-week
Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Brenda Bournes
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Are we on a path to destruction of the planet or is the media reporting hyperbolic claims influenced by hidden agendas? This course will examine 'green' lifestyle choices from two perspectives: the more cerebral understanding facilitated by traditional classroom meetings to discuss the biology behind environmental sustainability and the more visceral understanding afforded by reaching out beyond the classroom to experience first-hand some of the sustainability issues that affect our day to day lives.

Comments:

8-week
Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
Faculty:
Jaisy Joseph
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

The Gospel of John records the mission of Jesus Christ as one of coming so "that they may have life and have it abundantly" (Jn 10:10). Yet, we witness the opposite when we see powerful social forces (racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, etc) disrupt and dehumanize meaningful relationships between peoples. In this course, we will explore eight social issues to get at the heart of this contradiction. The first half of the quarter will focus on global relationships under the headings of global poverty, war, and environment. The second half of the quarter will attend to national relationships under the headings of national poverty, healthcare, incarceration, affirmative action, and feminism.

Comments:

Intersession
Prequisite: UCOR 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
These courses each include four key elements: An introduction to theology as an academic discipline; an examination of some of the theological beliefs that have shaped Christian understandings of the divine, especially in the Catholic Jesuit theological tradition, and a consideration of their implications for life today; an exploration of a key issue, person, or text that has had a formative role in shaping this theological tradition; and an opportunity for students to reflect on their own spiritual life and become more thoughtful and articulate in expressing their own spiritual values.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Joshua Johnston
Term:
Summer
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Intersession
Prequisite: UCOR 2500

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
A. Garoutte
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is an introduction to video production within the context of contemporary art history, theory, and practice. Students will examine video's formal elements and theoretical concerns through production and critique of their own projects as well as screenings and discussions of work by contemporary artists. With an emphasis on building experimental narratives and developing creative concepts, this course will provide students a comprehensive overview of production techniques. The course is conducted through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, screenings, and critiques of student work and videos by contemporary artists, class discussions, readings, and individual and collaborative video productions and presentations.

Comments:

Cross-listed with PHOT-2650-01
Freshman/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Claire Garoutte
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to digital photography designed to teach camera operations, exposure techniques, output and printing, elements of composition and theory. Critical and creative thinking will be demonstrated through the exercise of aesthetic judgment, assignments and class discussion. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, critique, class discussions and weekly slide presentations of noted photographers. Students will be given weekly photography assignments designed around the technical and theoretical information presented in class. Photography will be further contextualized within the larger social, political and historic environment. Students will learn to see photographic works as reflections of the societies in which they are created.

Comments:

Cross-listed with PHOT-1610-01
Adjustable digital camera required
Freshman/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Arturo Araujo
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is a hands-on exploration of the five major methods of fine art printmaking (relief, intaglio, stencil, planographic). Class consists of technical demonstration lectures, hands on learning exercises, and the production of simple exemplary limited edition fine art prints. Students will be responsible for reading assignments, oral and written reviews critiques, studying prints in local museums and/ or galleries and on campus art venues. A small service learning component will be assigned to one of the printmaking assignments.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ART-2300-02
$75 course fee
Freshman/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Francisco Guerrero
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This is an introductory studio course designed to introduce students to painting. The course will develop skills to begin investigating painting as an artistic medium and method of individual expression.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ART-2400-02
Freshman/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:
Digital Imaging is a course that explores working with photography outside the parameters of traditional darkroom photography. The focus is on post-processing images for ends, including compositing multiple images, combining text & images, and working to conceptually to develop a complex visual book of digital images. Artist presentations and readings serve as launching off points for class discussions regarding the nature of digital images in our media saturated culture and the ways we can work with them. With each new project introduced throughout the quarter there will be corresponding technical demonstrations dedicated to specific technical aspects of Photoshop, from basic to intermediate. No previous Photoshop experience is required for the class.
Comments:

Cross-listed with ARTD-2710-02
Freshman/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Trung Pham
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to the fundamentals of three-dimensional design. Students will learn about the elements of visual art: line, plane, mass, volume, shape, movement as well as the principle of design: proportion, repetition, rhythm, emphasis, balance, symmetry and hierarchy. Students will have five projects. They will write an artist statement for each assignment and orally present their artworks in class. One 5-10 paged paper of formal analysis on masterwork of sculpture will be required.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ART-1500-01
$30 course fee
Freshman/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Kristofer Carlson
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to the fundamentals of three-dimensional design. Students will learn about the elements of visual art: line, plane, mass, volume, shape, movement as well as the principle of design: proportion, repetition, rhythm, emphasis, balance, symmetry and hierarchy. Students will have five projects. They will write an artist statement for each assignment and orally present their artworks in class. One 5-10 paged paper of formal analysis on masterwork of sculpture will be required.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ART-1500-02
$30 course fee
Freshman/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
TBD
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This is a beginning acting class focusing on the fundamentals of the craft of acting. Students will participate in exercises designed to help develop physical and vocal presence, an awareness of impulse and being 'in the moment', and text analysis and action oriented skills specific to acting a text. They will participate in a number of individual and partner performance exercises. Using the techniques and insights learned in these exercises students will create a performance of a scene from Samuel Beckett's WAITING FOR GODOT.

Comments:

Cross-listed with THTR-2500-02
$60 course fee
Freshman/Sophomore standing

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Natalie Cisneros
Term:
Fall
Year:
2020
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prerequisite: 1100

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2020
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

People disagree. A lot. In this course, we will ask whether it is true that Americans today are more divided than ever, and if so, what we can do about it. This course will examine the numerous fault-lines, real and imagined, in contemporary culture. By reading across disagreements and paying attention to evidence and methods of persuasion, students will learn to analyze arguments and write persuasively for both receptive and resistant audiences.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

People disagree. A lot. In this course, we will ask whether it is true that Americans today are more divided than ever, and if so, what we can do about it. This course will examine the numerous fault-lines, real and imagined, in contemporary culture. By reading across disagreements and paying attention to evidence and methods of persuasion, students will learn to analyze arguments and write persuasively for both receptive and resistant audiences.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Wilson, Joshua
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Aguirre, Robert
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This writing seminar helps students develop as college-level, academic writers. Students will engage, rhetorically, with the complexities of class war in America to develop their abilities to participate in important discourses, understand and respond to the arguments of others, and develop and support their own positions. Through deep inquiry and argument, this seminar facilitates the habits of critical and creative questioning and thinking to help students become more proficient and skillful academic thinkers and writers.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Aguirre, Robert
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This writing seminar helps students develop as college-level, academic writers. Students will engage, rhetorically, with the complexities of class war in America to develop their abilities to participate in important discourses, understand and respond to the arguments of others, and develop and support their own positions. Through deep inquiry and argument, this seminar facilitates the habits of critical and creative questioning and thinking to help students become more proficient and skillful academic thinkers and writers.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Black, Russell
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

In this course you will develop academic writing skills by practicing a variety of rhetorical situations that engage the complex relationships between the Islamic and Western Worlds. Through assigned readings and class discussions, we will explore the representations of Islam in the news media and popular culture, and discover ways in which we can contribute our own voices and actions to the many issues facing the peoples of the Middle East.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Wilson, Joshua
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Packard, Wingate
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Our topic is work, with reflection, analysis and research on these questions:  What meanings do we attach to different kinds of work?  How does work affect identity?  How does work shape the worker and the larger society?  What is the context of the minimum-wage debate in Seattle?  What are the conditions of work where the things we "consume" are made, and how do those conditions affect us as consumers?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Neel, David
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course provides an introduction  to the mathematical ideas behind epidemic modeling and prediction with a focus on logical thinking and epidemic simulation. Topics covered include graph theory (used to represent the spread of a disease in a group), compartmental models, as well as probability and statistics. Computer laboratory sections will provide hands-on experience with building mathematical models to help determine various health policies and resource allocation.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Neel, David
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course provides an introduction  to the mathematical ideas behind epidemic modeling and prediction with a focus on logical thinking and epidemic simulation. Topics covered include graph theory (used to represent the spread of a disease in a group), compartmental models, as well as probability and statistics. Computer laboratory sections will provide hands-on experience with building mathematical models to help determine various health policies and resource allocation.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Chopra, Serena
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to creative inquiry and expression through the study and practice of key genres in creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Students' principal work in the class will consist of the production of original works in each of these three genres. In support of this work, students will respond to model poems, stories, and essays, and they will engage in artistic discussions about the areas where genres overlap. Assignments will include both written and oral components.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Robertson, Leanne
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will allow students to gain mathematical skills useful for citizenship. Topics covered include voting theory, financial math, probability and statistics. In addition, students will learn why quantitative literacy is important for everyone in our society and explore barriers to achieving this type of literacy.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Humphreys, Jim
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to mathematical ideas, emphasizing a multicultural, or global, perspective to studying quantitative methods, logical thinking, and algorithmic processes.

Standard mathematical concepts are introduced through examples drawn from traditional and non-European cultures. Topics covered include: sona drawing and the Euclidean algorithm; number systems and arithmetic; Sanskrit poetry, Pascal's Triangle, the Fibonacci numbers, and continued fractions; mathematical relations and kinship relations; symmetry and art; randomization, divination, and games.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Faculty:
Huber, Craig
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to mathematical ideas used in the modern world, with an emphasis on quantitative methods applied to life experiences and on developing problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Topics include graphing, exponential growth, financial mathematics, probability, and statistics. Additional topics may include voting theory, graph theory, Fibonacci numbers, geometry, or other mathematical concepts and applications.

Comments:

Prequisite: high school algebra & geometry

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning
Courses in quantitative reasoning appropriate to students' major field. Essential goals include developing basic or more advanced quantitative reasoning skills (including the ability to manipulate expressions), evaluating probabilities, creating and interpreting graphs, using mathematics to solve problems, and making arguments with numbers.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Carlson, Kristofer
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introductory studio course designed to introduce students to Drawing. Developing skills to begin investigating drawing as an artistic medium and method of individual expression.

Comments:

Cros-listed with ART-1200-02

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Cerny, Dawn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to the fundamentals of three-dimensional design. Students will learn about the elements of visual art: line, plane, mass, volume, shape, movement as well as the principle of design: proportion, repetition, rhythm, emphasis, balance, symmetry and hierarchy. Students will have five projects. They will write an artist statement for each assignment and orally present their artworks in class. One 5-10 paged paper of formal analysis on masterwork of sculpture will be required.

Comments:

$30 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Roth, Tara
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What does it mean to be a community member of Seattle? How do we express through narrative craft the personal, historical, social, or political ramifications of what it means to live in this dynamic urban landscape? In this course you will read an array of literature about Seattle and the Pacific Northwest and will craft original works of fiction and narrative non-fiction to describe the people and place that is home to our university.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Downing, Craig
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course focuses on the art of putting pictures in motion to tell a story. Students will first explore the history of this art, and then will use film techniques to tell their own stories using found imagery, cell phones, digital cameras and visual and audio editing software. The course goal is visual literacy, as it pertains to the students' ability to both share ideas and to understand motion pictures.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Roth, Tara
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What does it mean to be a community member of Seattle? How do we express through narrative craft the personal, historical, social, or political ramifications of what it means to live in this dynamic urban landscape? In this course you will read an array of literature about Seattle and the Pacific Northwest and will craft original works of fiction and narrative non-fiction to describe the people and place that is home to our university.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Mouton, Alexander
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

As a Core course, Digital Photography will involve equal parts making images, reading, writing, and analyzing/discussing. Assignments progress on a formal level from B&W to color and then to working with images in time, whether stop-motion or sequenced as short experimental films. The ideas students bring to the projects will be emphasized and the readings, films, image presentations, and discussions will provide direction to explore themes such as consumerism, the environment, gender, social diversity, imagination and dreams. The photographic medium has undergone changes in the last decade at a rate unparalleled since photography's invention during the latter part of the 19th Century. What does digital photography hold for the 21st Century? How is it different from working with film -or is it? What are artists doing within the medium today and what are their influences? These and other questions will be addressed over the course of the quarter as the technical, conceptual and formal properties of the medium are introduced.

Comments:

Cros-listed with PHOT-1610-01
Adjustable digital camera required

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Johnston, Alexander
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course takes a production-based approach towards exploring the history and development of media works that attempt to visualize “real life” through the documentary film and other non-fiction forms. It examines the many ways in which real world experiences, events, and individuals are represented through visual means, and how these forms shift and hybridize over time.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Bennett, Gretchen
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is an art seminar and studio course, with a focus on the design and development of small, art-based, book publications, performing across disciplines and materials. Learning methods include working with digital technology as well as manual methods (for example, collage and drawing) and writing. From a thematic point of view, the course will explore the basic concepts of space that combines art, design, media and daily life, in book form. At the conclusion of this course, student work will be summarized into a comprehensive catalog. This publication will continue to serve as a basis for further teaching/education/design works in various cultural contexts.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

As a Core course, Digital Photography will involve equal parts making images, reading, writing, and analyzing/discussing. Assignments progress on a formal level from B&W to color and then to working with images in time, whether stop-motion or sequenced as short experimental films. The ideas students bring to the projects will be emphasized and the readings, films, image presentations, and discussions will provide direction to explore themes such as consumerism, the environment, gender, social diversity, imagination and dreams. The photographic medium has undergone changes in the last decade at a rate unparalleled since photography's invention during the latter part of the 19th Century. What does digital photography hold for the 21st Century? How is it different from working with film -or is it? What are artists doing within the medium today and what are their influences? These and other questions will be addressed over the course of the quarter as the technical, conceptual and formal properties of the medium are introduced.

Comments:

Adjustable digital camera required

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Pham, Trung
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to the fundamentals of three-dimensional design. Students will learn about the elements of visual art: line, plane, mass, volume, shape, movement as well as the principle of design: proportion, repetition, rhythm, emphasis, balance, symmetry and hierarchy. Students will have five projects. They will write an artist statement for each assignment and orally present their artworks in class. One 5-10 paged paper of formal analysis on masterwork of sculpture will be required.

Comments:

$30 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This is a beginning acting class focusing on the fundamentals of the craft of acting. Students will participate in exercises designed to help develop physical and vocal presence, an awareness of impulse and being 'in the moment', and text analysis and action oriented skills specific to acting a text. They will participate in a number of individual and partner performance exercises. Using the techniques and insights learned in these exercises students will create a performance of a scene from Samuel Beckett's WAITING FOR GODOT.

Comments:

$60 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Chung, Erin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Class Piano is designed for students who have no previous experience in piano playing. The course introduces basic keyboard and musicianship skills that enable students to be musically creative and expressive, as well as enable them to enjoy the process of creating music. Emphasis is placed on developing listening skills, performing skills, and a few useful elements of music theory. Beyond developing basic playing skills, this class will enable students to develop the confidence to make aesthetic judgments, express themselves creatively through the piano and interpret and analyze music.

Comments:

Cross-listed with MUSC-2910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course immerses students in the creative process of designing visual worlds for the stage. Students create a variety of designs that build visual communication, collaboration, creativity, ingenuity, composition, conceptual development and presentation skills. Class will attend live theatre performances and reflect on these experiences through writing and discussion.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Brown, Amiya
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This class addresses light as an art form through analytical observations, practical applications, and thoughtful critique. This class builds a foundation of understanding how light exists in our lives by breaking down properties of light into color, quality, intensity, shadow, contrast, and environment. Writing and basic drawing techniques are incorporated as a means of communication.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Codykramers, Dominic
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Put your headphones on and delve deeply into the power of sound in and as art! Experience installations and performances on the cutting edge of music and aural creativity. Learn the basic skills and techniques of generating and manipulating sound to touch the senses and impart emotion, ideas, and meaning. Then integrate what you've learned and experienced by expressing your own ideas through a unique piece of multi-media, sound-focused art.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Cerny, Dawn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is a hands-on exploration of the five major methods of fine art printmaking (relief, intaglio, stencil, planographic). Class consists of technical demonstration lectures, hands on learning exercises, and the production of simple exemplary limited edition fine art prints. Students will be responsible for reading assignments, oral and written reviews critiques, studying prints in local museums and/ or galleries and on campus art venues. A small service learning component will be assigned to one of the printmaking assignments.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ART-2300-01
$75 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Venker, Josef
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to the art and craft of handmade letterforms (italic writing) adapted for modern artistic use. Students will learn the formal italic form and variations such as swash, informal, cursive, and instructions for future personalization. Skill will be attained through a series of practice exercises that will then be applied to the creation of finished works of calligraphic art.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ART-3380-01
$75 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Stump, Gregory
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is an exploration of what might be called visual language, or using pictures - sometimes with words, sometimes without - to convey ideas and information with clarity and efficiency. You will develop your visual literacy and abilities by creating a wide range of pictorial graphics, as well as by analyzing examples of effective static visual communication. While the focus here is on creating hand-drawn visuals, you do not need to have any special experience or background to be successful in this course. Your ability to imagine, convey, arrange, and edit information is more important here than your artistic skills.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This is a beginning acting class focusing on the fundamentals of the craft of acting. Students will participate in exercises designed to help develop physical and vocal presence, an awareness of impulse and being 'in the moment', and text analysis and action oriented skills specific to acting a text. They will participate in a number of individual and partner performance exercises. Using the techniques and insights learned in these exercises students will create a performance of a scene from Samuel Beckett's WAITING FOR GODOT.

Comments:

$60 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Adejumobi, Saheed
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course analyzes modern understandings of human rights in light of Global African Studies intellectual traditions and Jesuit/Catholic intellectual traditions.  Introduces students to theories of social movements, African Diaspora history, and historical methodology.  We chart the history of social movements before and since the Haitian Revolution, the Pan-African Congress, and the modern civil rights movement. We will analyze and critique the legacies of various methodologies and social and political theories for modern day social movements.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Boehler, Robert
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

From cave painting to computer-generated imagery, humankind has long utilized visual elements to inform, engage, and enthrall observers of performance. This course seeks to engage the student in the acquisition of the techniques related to the creation of "spectacle," which, taken at its broadest meaning, is the visual component of all storytelling.

Comments:

$60 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Kangas, William
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will be an intellectual history of the two movements that stand as the foundation of modern Western thought and culture: the Enlightenment and Romanticism. The goal will be to come to an understanding of the manner in which these two movements articulated competing and alternative visions as to the nature of individual and collective life. In this manner, we should come to better grasp the assumptions and presuppositions that still underpin contemporary thinking about political, social, cultural, ethical, and spiritual matters.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Green, David
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

In this course, you will study the ideas of nation, national identity, and cultural representation by exploring the more than 60-year history of the Eurovision Song Contest — the most watched TV entertainment show on earth. What is a nation? How do nations represent and brand themselves through musical performance? What cultural, linguistic, and historical contexts help explain national affiliations or animosities? And what hidden gems give us clues to understanding national cultures?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Kangas, William
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will be an intellectual history of the two movements that stand as the foundation of modern Western thought and culture: the Enlightenment and Romanticism. The goal will be to come to an understanding of the manner in which these two movements articulated competing and alternative visions as to the nature of individual and collective life. In this manner, we should come to better grasp the assumptions and presuppositions that still underpin contemporary thinking about political, social, cultural, ethical, and spiritual matters.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Tracy, Hannah
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What does it mean to be human? How do we, as humans, interact with and understand one another and the natural world? This course asks you to consider the ways both literary and scientific texts help us think about these and other shared questions. This course will help you see both literary and scientific writing in new ways and to discover how these two fields overlap to express and shape the way we understand our world and our experiences.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Tracy, Hannah
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What does it mean to be human? How do we, as humans, interact with and understand one another and the natural world? This course asks you to consider the ways both literary and scientific texts help us think about these and other shared questions. This course will help you see both literary and scientific writing in new ways and to discover how these two fields overlap to express and shape the way we understand our world and our experiences.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Spencer, Heath
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines the global dimensions and impact of the First World War, from the perspectives of non-Europeans as well as Europeans, civilians as well as soldiers, women as well as men, and home fronts as well as military fronts. In addition to the well-known stories of military strategy and the technology of warfare, it offers new perspectives on the interaction of diverse peoples and cultures in the early twentieth century.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Koppelman, Katherine
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Do we live in a posthuman (or transhuman) world? Is the category of the human no longer expansive enough to account for all the ways in which we live today? Virtual existences, scientific advancements, and philosophical investigations have pushed us to what some would consider the "limit" of a purely human existence. However, the category of the hybrid, the marvelous, the cybernetic has been a topic of literary investigation for hundreds (if not thousands) of years. This course reads some of those literary texts alongside the concepts of both humanism and posthumanism-interrogating the literary texts for the ways that they frame and respond to the category of the human.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Purs, Aldis
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course uses the idea of a coup to discuss and study political legitimacy, the transfer of power, and the relation between state, citizen and political change.  The course gives an overview of coups through history before examining the theoretical underpinnings of coups (what makes a coup a coup and when is the concept used incorrectly).  Students will research and examine various coups across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Aakre, Lindsey
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will examine the folk and fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm and look at a number of modern adaptations of these tales to see how the tales (and the genre) evolve through time.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Trafton, John
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will look at the origins of cinema and media, starting with the paintings that brought historical moments to life on canvas towards the end of the eighteenth century. From there, we will explore the impact of moving panorama paintings, the use of optical illusions in magic lantern shows, and the rise of photography as a storytelling tool. We will also look at opera, illustrated sketch journalism, and the emergence of zoos as a popular form of communal experience based on visual perception. The course will end with the rise of cinema, and, as an epilogue, we will explore the rise of modern architecture as the logical consequence of how cinema informed a shift in thinking about space and visual presentation.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Evans, Victor
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course explores constructions of gender, race, class, sexuality, and nation in the recent animated films of Walt Disney. By examining the content of several Disney films created within particular historical and cultural contexts, students will develop and expand their understanding of the cultural productions, meanings, and intersections of racism, sexism, classism, colonialism, and imperialism.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Schultz-Figueroa, Benjamin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

How does going to the movies change based on where you live? What types of films and videos are screened, made, and saved here that aren't elsewhere? How does the history of a place effect what people watch and where they watch it? In this class you will explore these questions by getting to know the unique film culture surrounding you in the city of Seattle. We will take weekly trips off-campus to learn how film is being used for a wide variety of purposes across the city. Students will leave the class with experiences of new types of film culture and an in-depth understanding of spectatorship studies and film history.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Phinney, Harriet
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is an anthropological introduction to three social issues that have been the focus of much research, policy and popular interest in the United States: environmental sustainability, racial identity, and gender difference and inequality. In our efforts to better understand these issues (and act upon them), anthropological research offers us a wealth of empirical data and analysis drawn from the richness of our cultural and biological variety and the sweep of human history and evolution.

Comments:

X: ANTH 2120-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Broussard, Brenda
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Appropriation of Breastfeeding is a 5-credit course designed to be taken for one-quarter of an academic year. The overall purpose of the course is to create culture of health and wellness among the students pursuing degrees in health and related disciplines. The specific aims of this course are to help the students explore personal values and attitudes toward breastfeeding and to hone new knowledge and skills to promote breastfeeding. The course will provide safe and inclusive learning environment in which breastfeeding is examined as a socio-cultural, political, and health construct through structured and direct engagement in diverse course activities.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Bowen, Monica
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to the importance of context for the study of ancient art, particularly how the current physical context as well as the original historical context of a work of art can affect its meaning and interpretation over time. The historical record of ancient artifacts is often fragmentary and dependent upon their modern locations and the history of how they got there.  Students examine how the meaning of an object can depend upon its current location and on the history of its use and display. Class topics include art crime, looting, damage sustained by a work of art, the displacement of objects in museums, and the study of "patriarchal" history writing.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ARTH-2110-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Zhang, Enyu
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Grounded in theoretical perspectives of International Relations, the course materials focus on the United Nations (UN) system and its evolving roles in the pursuit of security, peace, prosperity, and justice in the world.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Andolina, Robert
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to the complex ways in which environmental factors and human cultures influence each other across the globe. The course adopts a holistic anthropological approach in understanding humans as biological, social, and intellectual beings engaged with the environment around them.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Mehmetaj, Adeliada
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Modern economies suffer from the ills of business cycles-inflation, deflation, recessions and unemployment. This course will focus on the question; What if anything, should governments do to moderate business cycles? The course goal is to create informed citizens who can participate in economic discourse at a high level. Course features include economic modeling, analysis of measures and data and critical evaluation of policy.

Comments:

Not for Albers students

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Fortier, Theodore
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course examines the more than 15,000 year old archaeological record of the Northwest Coast of North America, the culture area extending from southeast Alaska to coastal British Columbia, Washington,Oregon, and northern California. This region has fascinated anthropologists for almost 150 years because its indigenous peoples have developed distinctive cultures based on fishing, hunting, and gathering economies. The course examines the ecological and ethnographic background for the region, and then study how these have shaped archaeologists' ideas about the past. The contents of sites and consider the relationship between data,interpretation, and theory.

Comments:

Cross-listed with ANTH 2910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Perez, Alfred
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Helping others is a multifaceted process. What is the meaning of help and how is it accomplished? Who decides the nature of the problem? What are the impacts of helping on the giver and receiver? What ethical issues and value stances arise? Students will explore the dynamics of helping individuals and communities resolve problems by examining the links between personal and social problems, historical approaches and theoretical frameworks used by the helping professions.

Comments:

Cross-listed with SOCW1510-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Lawrence, Charles
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to, analysis and critique of, perspectives on contemporary social issues from conservative viewpoints including: traditional conservative, Evangelical/social conservative, neo-con/liberal and libertarian.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This class provides students with the opportunity to develop a theoretically critical awareness of the relationship between love, sexuality, and marriage from a social scientific lens. The class will explore the relationship between sex, love, romance, desire, and intimate relationships in the modern world through a social scientific lens. Topics to be considered may include: the intersections between race, ethnicity, class, gender, nation, sexuality, and marriage; changing definitions of sexual respectability; prostitution and sex work in different contexts; sexual behavior and sexual ideals; transsexuality and transgender identities; the varieties of love; the meaning of marriage; state regulation of marriage and sexuality; love in popular culture, and historical shifts in constructions of affect and emotion.

Comments:

Cross-listed with WGST 3910-02
LGBTQ

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Lawrence, Charles
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introduction to, analysis and critique of, perspectives on contemporary social issues from conservative viewpoints including: traditional conservative, Evangelical/social conservative, neo-con/liberal and libertarian.

Comments:

Cross-listed with SOCL 2910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Zimmerman, Nadya
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will examine the systems, institutions, and human relations that constitute postmodern empire. We will consider if, how, and why tools of historical empires--military occupation, economic manipulation, cultural influence, racialized social stratification, and privileged ideological/moralistic rhetoric--might appear in different guises in the postmodern world. In particular, we will investigate postmodern empire in relation to technology, authority, mass media, popular culture/entertainment, debt, labor, work, and history-telling and consider its ramifications in terms of increasing fear of silence, drive for expediency, elimination of risk, anxiousness without constant connectivity, and acquiescence to surveillance.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
Faculty:
Zimmerman, Nadya
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will examine the systems, institutions, and human relations that constitute postmodern empire. We will consider if, how, and why tools of historical empires--military occupation, economic manipulation, cultural influence, racialized social stratification, and privileged ideological/moralistic rhetoric--might appear in different guises in the postmodern world. In particular, we will investigate postmodern empire in relation to technology, authority, mass media, popular culture/entertainment, debt, labor, work, and history-telling and consider its ramifications in terms of increasing fear of silence, drive for expediency, elimination of risk, anxiousness without constant connectivity, and acquiescence to surveillance.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Gualtieri, Lyn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The overarching questions this seminar will address are "How does the geology along 1-90 in Washington state change and what accounts for the geologic differences east and west of the Cascade Mountains?"  You will design your own research questions, conduct your own geologic fieldwork, collect your own data and learn how to apply the scientific method in a geologic setting. You will participate in fieldtrips to geologically significant locations both east and west of the Cascade Mountains.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Hughes Clark, Joanne
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

How did we deduce that the Milky Way is not the only galaxy in the universe? We use the physics of gravity and light to discover the properties of stars, which enabled Edwin Hubble to determine the distance to the Andromeda Galaxy in the 1920s. Soon afterwards, he proved that our home was only one of a multitude of "Island Universes," scattered throughout a vast, expanding cosmos, connecting his observations with Einstein's General Relativity. We use the scientific method to show how stars and galaxies formed, and explore the open questions about the nature of dark matter and dark energy.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1200
Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Bourns, Brenda
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Why do some people get sick, while others do not? Why does an individual get an inherited disease, but neither of their parents show any symptoms? Some of the answers lie in our DNA, and how we inherit the genes that help determine our health. In this course, we will explore how our genes shape many aspects of our lives, including a predisposition for many diseases, and what we can do to stay healthy.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Hughes Clark, Joanne
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

How did we deduce that the Milky Way is not the only galaxy in the universe? We use the physics of gravity and light to discover the properties of stars, which enabled Edwin Hubble to determine the distance to the Andromeda Galaxy in the 1920s. Soon afterwards, he proved that our home was only one of a multitude of "Island Universes," scattered throughout a vast, expanding cosmos, connecting his observations with Einstein's General Relativity. We use the scientific method to show how stars and galaxies formed, and explore the open questions about the nature of dark matter and dark energy.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1200
Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Gualtieri, Lyn
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The overarching questions this seminar will address are "How does the geology along 1-90 in Washington state change and what accounts for the geologic differences east and west of the Cascade Mountains?"  You will design your own research questions, conduct your own geologic fieldwork, collect your own data and learn how to apply the scientific method in a geologic setting. You will participate in fieldtrips to geologically significant locations both east and west of the Cascade Mountains.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Bourns, Brenda
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Why do some people get sick, while others do not? Why does an individual get an inherited disease, but neither of their parents show any symptoms? Some of the answers lie in our DNA, and how we inherit the genes that help determine our health. In this course, we will explore how our genes shape many aspects of our lives, including a predisposition for many diseases, and what we can do to stay healthy.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Severson, Eric
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Acharya, Vinod
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course focuses on the question of what it means to be human. By combining a historical approach with a problem-oriented one, this course introduces students to fundamental questions concerning the meaning of human existence, which are at the core of Jesuit education. Readings include texts from Plato, Descartes, Hume, Kant, and Nietzsche.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Wirth, Jason
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Moskalik, Janice
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course introduces students to philosophical reasoning through the exploration of some perrenial questions about human nature. Topics will include the role of philosophical reflection in human life, questions about justice, questions about free will and determinism, and questions about equality. We will consider and analyze the perspectives of several prominent figures in the history of philosophy alongside more contemporary perspectives.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Acharya, Vinod
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course focuses on the question of what it means to be human. By combining a historical approach with a problem-oriented one, this course introduces students to fundamental questions concerning the meaning of human existence, which are at the core of Jesuit education. Readings include texts from Plato, Descartes, Hume, Kant, and Nietzsche.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Peduti, Douglas
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Kidder, Paul
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course introduces students to the discipline of philosophy in a manner that traces historically the idea that the practice of philosophy can inform a life lived in accord with fundamental truths and intrinsic values. Beginning with the forms of "spiritual exercise" embodied by the ancient philosopher, Socrates, we will follow the Socratic model of inquiry and life through the middle age and into the modern period.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Moskalik, Janice
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course introduces students to philosophical reasoning through the exploration of some perrenial questions about human nature. Topics will include the role of philosophical reflection in human life, questions about justice, questions about free will and determinism, and questions about equality. We will consider and analyze the perspectives of several prominent figures in the history of philosophy alongside more contemporary perspectives.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Arvidson, P. Sven
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

Are you just like every other human being, or are you unique?  Most of us assume we are both the same as others and unique. But in what ways, and on what are these assumptions based?  Philosophically examining these assumptions may reveal surprising possibilities for the meaning of human life and death, personal identity, freedom and responsibility, reverent respect for persons, and more. To accomplish this examination, this course uses primary philosophical sources spanning from ancient times to present. This course also introduces you to logic and critical thinking.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Severson, Eric
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Dominick, Yancy
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

What is ethics? Is it a science or an art? What--if anything--determines the difference between right and wrong? We will examine responses to these and other questions by Aristotle, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill. We will also address the practical application of these theories by discussing issues including poverty and social justice, animal rights, and euthanasia.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Dominick, Yancy
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

What is ethics? Is it a science or an art? What--if anything--determines the difference between right and wrong? We will examine responses to these and other questions by Aristotle, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill. We will also address the practical application of these theories by discussing issues including poverty and social justice, animal rights, and euthanasia.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Dombrowski, Daniel
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Online
Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Rellihan, Matthew
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course will address the central questions in the study of ethics. These include (1) meta-ethical questions (e.g., Are there objective moral facts? Is morality culturally relative? Are humans inherently selfish?), questions in normative ethics (e.g., Which norms should our actions be guided by? Which actions are right, which are wrong? What is of value in life?), and (3) questions in applied ethics (e.g., Is abortion immoral? Is the death penalty? Do animals have rights? Do we have a moral obligation to help the poor?). We will consider competing answers to these and other ethical questions, drawn from a variety of sources, both ancient and modern. The aim of this course is introduce students to some of the major debates in the study of ethics and to develop their ability to reason about ethical issues.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2900 Ethical Reasoning
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

There are two principal aims in this course, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to understand the major options in the history of philosophical ethics, especially utilitarianism, Kantianism (or deontology), and virtue ethics. The practical aim of the course is both to apply these theories to various ethical problems and to see how these theories emerge out of these problems.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Suriano, Benjamin
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course covers a set of theoretical and applied issues in ethics, organized around the questions - "What are our moral obligations? What do those obligations entail? How do we make sense of those obligations?" Work in the course includes careful evaluation of philosophical texts and also reflective work on the part of students. Applied material focuses on questions in business ethics.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Freeman, Bradley
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the core tenets and limitations of the field of postcolonial studies. After drawing on this critical lens to read literature written from the epicenter of British empire, we will turn to later writers who respond to and critique the legacies of imperialism and its concomitant literary traditions. We will trace the emergence of this field in its historical and cultural context, recognizing its productive value as well as potential fault lines.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 2910 Ethical Reasoning Business
Faculty:
Colaner, Nathan
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course considers both the morally relevant situations a business person may encounter, and the various moral theories that may help inform thinking about those situations. This course includes a sustained discussion of the moral and philosophical elements of the vocation of the business leader, specifically as it relates to three groups: executives and entrepreneurs, managers, and employees.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Business/Economics majors only or with permission

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Kamerling, Henry
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Is popular culture as it finds expression around the world coercive or liberating? Is it an example of the West's continuing imperial impulse or does it contain the possibility democratize the world? This course will examine differing approaches to understanding popular culture and its relationship to capitalist modes of production. We will ask if the world-wide popularity of Hollywood's Avengers films or the international popularity of Hello Kitty! Erodes the authority of the nation state while reinforcing traditional racial, gendered, and class hierarchies throughout the world or if there is revolutionary potential embedded in various manifestations of popular culture.

Comments:

Online

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 2920 Ethical Reasoning Health Care
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course combines a broad exploration of the principles of ethical reasoning with a practical application of these principles to ethical problems in health care. We begin by exploring and evaluating four major ethical theories in depth. Building on this foundation, we then examine specific ethical challenges facing health care professionals today, including beginning-and-end-of-life issues, ethics of medical experimentation, freedom of conscience, and just distribution of health care resources. Throughout, we reflect on the principles behind some of the main concepts that health care professionals rely on every day, such as health, quality of life, autonomy, and consent.

Comments:

Hybrid
Prequisite: UCOR 2500
CAST
Required for NURS students; Recommended for DIUS students; Open to all majors

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 29X0 Ethical Reasoning
These courses introduce students to major traditions of moral theory and ethical reasoning, engage students in critically examining ethical problems, and challenge students to develop rigorous personal systems of ethical reasoning. The central goals of the course are to develop students' skills in reasoning about ethical problems and encourage deep, habitual reflection on the ethical dimensions of life. This course requires a major case study analysis of some sort. Individual sections may focus on different ethical arenas or problems.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Dean, Michael
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course examines the rise, rule, and ruin of fascist regimes during the 20th and the history of antifascist resistance Europe, Latin America, and the United States. We'll scrutinize the texts, imagery, and cinema of fascist Italy and National Socialist Germany. We'll also search for parallels to fascism in other parts of the world. Was fascism a pathology limited to European democracies between the world wars, or can the word be used to describe authoritarian movements in other places and times? Is fascism possible today? If so, how do we fight it?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Dean, Michael
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course examines the rise, rule, and ruin of fascist regimes during the 20th and the history of antifascist resistance Europe, Latin America, and the United States. We'll scrutinize the texts, imagery, and cinema of fascist Italy and National Socialist Germany. We'll also search for parallels to fascism in other parts of the world. Was fascism a pathology limited to European democracies between the world wars, or can the word be used to describe authoritarian movements in other places and times? Is fascism possible today? If so, how do we fight it?

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Hawley, Hilary
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

When faced with global issues like social and environmental injustice, how can one person (or a committed few) make a difference? This course will consider the multicultural history and literature of the United States; through examination of novels, poetry, film, and historical documents, we will understand the roots of social and environmental justice and be inspired by models of individual advocacy, then participate in our own advocacy through service learning and a creative, impactful final project.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Hawley, Hilary
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

When faced with global issues like social and environmental injustice, how can one person (or a committed few) make a difference? This course will consider the multicultural history and literature of the United States; through examination of novels, poetry, film, and historical documents, we will understand the roots of social and environmental justice and be inspired by models of individual advocacy, then participate in our own advocacy through service learning and a creative, impactful final project.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will address the issue of global climate change. We will discuss the science behind how humans can affect the global climate--covering the major greenhouse gasses, how they impact the climate, and how the current and projected changes compare to previous climactic and atmospheric shifts. Students will dig into the science behind the "climate controversies," and explain the various lines of evidence for how we know the global shift is already underway.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Pettinato, Maria
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

A conceptual approach to understanding the history, structure, and function of cannabis including its effect on the human body. This course will introduce subject matter such as retrograde inhibition and the specific effect of cannabis on mitochondria. The course will examine mechanisms of the human brain, the concept of homeostasis, and the specific constituents and chemical characteristics of cannabis and its effect on the function of body systems.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Phinney, Harriet
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

TBD

Comments:

Cross-listed with ANTH 3910-02

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course will address the issue of global climate change. We will discuss the science behind how humans can affect the global climate--covering the major greenhouse gasses, how they impact the climate, and how the current and projected changes compare to previous climactic and atmospheric shifts. Students will dig into the science behind the "climate controversies," and explain the various lines of evidence for how we know the global shift is already underway.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Horton, Randall
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Why do people sometimes rise up against political or cultural institutions? How do the reasons for and goals of these revolutions change depending on the historical, political, and social contexts in which they take place? How can previous revolutions help us understand and/or problematize recent revolutions? How can a revolution be a force for social justice? This course asks you to consider these questions through the lens of literary texts that respond to and help incite political and social revolutions. You will develop insights into revolution as a global phenomenon with shared foundations but markedly different manifestations. This course emphasizes the complex ways different cultures are interconnected through their revolutionary literatures and their responses to oppressive governance and social structures.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Taylor, Thomas
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Why do people sometimes rise up against political or cultural institutions? How do the reasons for and goals of these revolutions change depending on the historical, political, and social contexts in which they take place? How can previous revolutions help us understand and/or problematize recent revolutions? How can a revolution be a force for social justice? This course asks you to consider these questions through the lens of literary texts that respond to and help incite political and social revolutions. You will develop insights into revolution as a global phenomenon with shared foundations but markedly different manifestations. This course emphasizes the complex ways different cultures are interconnected through their revolutionary literatures and their responses to oppressive governance and social structures.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Veith, Jerome
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the nature of contemporary global violence through a philosophical lens. It mobilizes the concept of historical effect, developed by the German thinker Hans-Georg Gadamer, to assess our present-day situatedness within an ongoing era of conflict, suffering, and trauma. In taking account of our historical inheritance of conflict, this assessment will involve analyzing both the overt narratives and tacit assumptions that frame our conception of violence.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3600 Social Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Sinha, Aakanksha
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course investigates the philosophical, social and psychological forces at work in the way humans create and deploy monsters to cope with the fear and uncertainty. Using philosophical and psychological resources, and drawing from stories, myths and media, this class seeks to understand and rethink the way strangers are turned to monsters.

Comments:

Cross-listed with SOCW3910-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3600 Social Science & Global Challenges          
Courses in the social sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of the social sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a social science as it relates to a global issue, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying know ledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3400 Humanities and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Veith, Jerome
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

This course explores the nature of contemporary global violence through a philosophical lens. It mobilizes the concept of historical effect, developed by the German thinker Hans-Georg Gadamer, to assess our present-day situatedness within an ongoing era of conflict, suffering, and trauma. In taking account of our historical inheritance of conflict, this assessment will involve analyzing both the overt narratives and tacit assumptions that frame our conception of violence.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3400 Humanities & Global Challenges
Courses that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the humanities. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of the humanities as they relate to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as a reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Gnanapragasam, Nirmala
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

In this course you will investigate the geologic causes, environmental impacts, and societal impacts of global natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, flooding, coastal erosion, and weather-related hazards. The course will focus on the physical processes that cause natural hazards as well as risk factors, prevention, mitigation, and preparedness. Since natural hazards affect all parts of the world, we will be able to compare the effects of similar hazards in different countries.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Pool, Thomas
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Are we on a path to destruction of the planet or is the media reporting hyperbolic claims influenced by hidden agendas? This course will examine 'green' lifestyle choices from two perspectives: the more cerebral understanding facilitated by traditional classroom meetings to discuss the biology behind environmental sustainability and the more visceral understanding afforded by reaching out beyond the classroom to experience first-hand some of the sustainability issues that affect our day to day lives.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

In this course you will investigate the geologic causes, environmental impacts, and societal impacts of global natural hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, flooding, coastal erosion, and weather-related hazards. The course will focus on the physical processes that cause natural hazards as well as risk factors, prevention, mitigation, and preparedness. Since natural hazards affect all parts of the world, we will be able to compare the effects of similar hazards in different countries.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 3800 Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
Faculty:
Bourns, Brenda
Term:
Winter
Year:
2021
Module:
Module III
Course Description:

Are we on a path to destruction of the planet or is the media reporting hyperbolic claims influenced by hidden agendas? This course will examine 'green' lifestyle choices from two perspectives: the more cerebral understanding facilitated by traditional classroom meetings to discuss the biology behind environmental sustainability and the more visceral understanding afforded by reaching out beyond the classroom to experience first-hand some of the sustainability issues that affect our day to day lives.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 3800 Natural Science & Global Challenges       
Courses in the natural sciences that explore important global issues through the lens of a specific discipline in the natural sciences. Each course focuses on a particular issue/challenge and course content assists students in understanding key disciplinary knowledge and approaches that provide insight into the issue. Students explore ways to productively think about and address the issue. These courses help students increase their understanding of complex global issues, develop knowledge of a natural science as it relates to global issues, explore approaches to and solutions for global issues, develop skills and confidence in applying knowledge to complex issues, and improve writing and research skills. Global Challenges courses include students from a variety of disciplines, promoting interdisciplinary conversation and understanding. This course requires a major paper or project, as well as some kind of reflective assignment where students are asked to synthesize their overall learning as it relates to the global issue being studied. Community-based learning and/or field or laboratory research is encouraged but not required.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Alarie, Shayla
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is about the historical role of the artist in society. We look at two moments in history when the identity of artists changed to learn how historical context helps us understand works of art. We ask why Renaissance artists argued that they were intellectuals rather than artisans and why Modem artists attacked the intellectual traditions of art to demand social change and radically question the purpose of visual art. To address these issues we explore themes such as Renaissance self-portraiture, 19th century paintings of labor, symbols of the liberal arts in the Renaissance, and German Dada artists' responses to the trauma of the First World War.

Comments:

Crosslisted with ARTH-2120-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the humanities by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important historical or literature-based questions arising from a humanities discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. Each section incorporates the interpretation of primary texts (prose fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction essays and books, historical documents, works of art, film, digital media, speeches, etc.) in relation to their cultural and historical contexts; explores the relationships between language, narratives, thought, and culture; and examines the ways in which important texts and events relate to each other across time. Essential goals include: Introducing students to an important question in the humanities, the relevant content necessary to study that question, and the ways in which the humanities pursue and generate knowledge; preparing students to read and evaluate primary texts in relationship to their contexts, and the use of those texts and interpretations as evidence to construct theses or arguments. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction/critical thinking, library research, critical reading, and oral presentation.

Course Type:

UCOR 1400 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
Faculty:
Perez, Alfred
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Over the last 20 years, a critical new developmental period between adolescence and adulthood has started to gain recognition. "Emerging Adulthood" or colloquially known as "Adulting" is characterized by the age of identity exploration, instability, self- focus, feeling "in-between," and infinite possibilities. This course will analyze whether this theory has validity, explore the factors that contribute to diverging developmental pathways, review the typical life of the American 20-something, and uncover the truth behind the stereotypes.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1600 Inquiry Seminar in Social Sciences
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the social sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a social science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about human behavior and social phenomena arising from a specific discipline in the social sciences. These courses all incorporate the direct study of human behavior or institutions through disciplinary-appropriate means (observation, experimentation, analysis of data, etc.); introduce students to developing hypotheses, research questions, and/or synthesizing qualitative data; and explore how knowledge of key social scientific principles provides explanatory insight into patterns of individual human and social behavior. In addition, these courses teach the following skills: academic writing, argument construction and critical thinking, critical reading, quantitative reasoning, and oral presentations.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Tracy, Hannah
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course will develop your academic writing skills by teaching you to write for a variety of rhetorical situations about the complex relationships between politics and media, with a focus on reasoned, ethical argumentation. Through assigned readings and class discussions, we will explore how the news media shape our views of politicians and political issues, and discover ways we can contribute our own voices to the political discourse.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Bennett, Gretchen
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

An introductory studio course designed to introduce students to Drawing. Developing skills to begin investigating drawing as an artistic medium and method of individual expression.

Comments:

Crosslisted with ART-1200-02

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Students learn and analyze Visual Language and Design Principle through lectures, hands-on studio exercises and projects to demonstrate their understanding of design principle in imaginative, creative ways. Each project will follow a typical design process and color theory from initial idea to project completion.

Comments:

Crosslisted with ART-1000-02

 

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Guerrero, Francisco
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This is an introductory studio course designed to introduce students to painting. The course will develop skills to begin investigating painting as an artistic medium and method of individual expression.

Comments:

Crosslisted with ART-2400-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
Faculty:
Smith, Alexandra
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

TBD

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
A seminar-format course designed to develop English college-level academic writing skills in all students to prepare them for both academic and other forms of writing they will encounter in later classes (argumentative writing, reflective writing, etc.). Emphasis on: 1) fundamental writing mechanics, 2) argument construction and use of evidence and 3) rhetorical thinking/flexibility to address various situations, audiences, and genres. Each faculty member selects a theme for their section(s) to focus students' reading and writing work.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Kasumi, Naomi
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

Students learn and analyze Visual Language and Design Principle through lectures, hands-on studio exercises and projects to demonstrate their understanding of design principle in imaginative, creative ways. Each project will follow a typical design process and color theory from initial idea to project completion.

Comments:

Cros-listed with ART-1000-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Reyes, Juan
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course introduces students to creative inquiry and expression through the study and practice of key genres in creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Students' principal work in the class will consist of the production of original works in each of these three genres. In support of this work, students will respond to model poems, stories, and essays, and they will engage in artistic discussions about the areas where genres overlap. Assignments will include both written and oral components.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Gottberg, Ki
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

ACT I: The World's Your Stage exposes you to the art and craft of acting in a variety of ways: you will see productions at local theaters, read scripts, discuss performances, and learn a variety of acting techniques to apply to the two scenes you will rehearse and perform for your classmates. You will have fun and learn much!

Comments:

$60 course fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Stump, Gregory
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course is an exploration of what might be called visual language, or using pictures - sometimes with words, sometimes without - to convey ideas and information with clarity and efficiency. You will develop your visual literacy and abilities by creating a wide range of pictorial graphics, as well as by analyzing examples of effective static visual communication. While the focus here is on creating hand-drawn visuals, you do not need to have any special experience or background to be successful in this course. Your ability to imagine, convey, arrange, and edit information is more important here than your artistic skills.

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Interpretation
Faculty:
Brown, Amiya
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

This course immerses students in the creative process of designing visual worlds for the stage. Students create a variety of designs that build visual communication, collaboration, creativity, ingenuity, composition, conceptual development and presentation skills. Class will attend live theatre performances and reflect on these experiences through writing and discussion.

Comments:

Cross-listed with THTR-2600-01

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
Courses that engage students in both creating and understanding expressive works of art. Courses may represent a variety of arts disciplines, including: visual art, music, drama, creative writing, etc. Essential goals include: develop skills in creative thinking and expression; have direct experience in the process of creating original works of art in some genre; learn to articulate a vision through art and seek to share that vision with others; learn and be able to apply basic artistic techniques and aesthetic principles relevant to the art form; incorporate understanding of social, political, economic, and historical context of artistic movements into creative expression; learn and be able to apply simple principles to evaluate and interpret works of art; study important and relevant works of art and examples of the form of art on which the class is focused; reflect on and analyze the creative process and works of art, orally and in writing. Fees may apply in some sections.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Lee, Se-Yeun
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What threatens the health of the Puget Sound ecosystem?  This course will focus on the ecosystem of the Puget Sound, the pollutants that can be found there, where they are coming from and how we can prevent them.  Students will do their own investigations on effects specific chemical are having on animal health and how rain gardens and river repair programs can prevent pollution from reaching the Sound.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Lee, Se-Yeun
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What threatens the health of the Puget Sound ecosystem?  This course will focus on the ecosystem of the Puget Sound, the pollutants that can be found there, where they are coming from and how we can prevent them.  Students will do their own investigations on effects specific chemical are having on animal health and how rain gardens and river repair programs can prevent pollution from reaching the Sound.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Verdan, Andrea
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The discipline of chemistry has close ties to ancient alchemy, but where does alchemy end and chemistry begin? How do we distinguish knowledge in the "magical" disciplines from knowledge in science? We will answer these questions by invoking J.K. Rowling's wizarding world of Harry Potter and, along the way, discover basic chemical principles and the nature of scientific knowledge.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1200
Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Lee, Se-Yeun
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What threatens the health of the Puget Sound ecosystem?  This course will focus on the ecosystem of the Puget Sound, the pollutants that can be found there, where they are coming from and how we can prevent them.  Students will do their own investigations on effects specific chemical are having on animal health and how rain gardens and river repair programs can prevent pollution from reaching the Sound.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Verdan, Andrea
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

The discipline of chemistry has close ties to ancient alchemy, but where does alchemy end and chemistry begin? How do we distinguish knowledge in the "magical" disciplines from knowledge in science? We will answer these questions by invoking J.K. Rowling's wizarding world of Harry Potter and, along the way, discover basic chemical principles and the nature of scientific knowledge.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1200
Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Hughes Clark, Joanne
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

How did we deduce that the Milky Way is not the only galaxy in the universe? We use the physics of gravity and light to discover the properties of stars, which enabled Edwin Hubble to determine the distance to the Andromeda Galaxy in the 1920s. Soon afterwards, he proved that our home was only one of a multitude of "Island Universes," scattered throughout a vast, expanding cosmos, connecting his observations with Einstein's General Relativity. We use the scientific method to show how stars and galaxies formed, and explore the open questions about the nature of dark matter and dark energy.

Comments:

Prerequisite: UCOR 1200
Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences
Faculty:
Lee, Se-Yeun
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module I
Course Description:

What threatens the health of the Puget Sound ecosystem?  This course will focus on the ecosystem of the Puget Sound, the pollutants that can be found there, where they are coming from and how we can prevent them.  Students will do their own investigations on effects specific chemical are having on animal health and how rain gardens and river repair programs can prevent pollution from reaching the Sound.

Comments:

Lab fee

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in Natural Science
Courses that introduce students to the subjects and methods of inquiry of the natural sciences by engaging in focused study of one or more particularly important questions arising from a natural science discipline. These courses introduce students to key concepts, knowledge, and principles of the relevant discipline as they relate to the questions being studied in the individual section. They are not intended to be survey courses or broad introductions to the discipline, but should be content-rich, with the content revolving around and connected to the central questions being studied. These courses engage students in studying questions about the physical/biological universe. All sections incorporate the direct examination of natural phenomena in either laboratory or field settings; use observation to develop and evaluate principles and hypotheses; and explore how knowledge of key scientific principles can be used to understand and interpret observations. UCOR 1200 Quantitative Reasoning is a prerequisite for UCOR 1810 courses. UCOR 1800 does not have any prerequisites.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Staff, Faculty
Term:
Spring
Year:
2021
Module:
Module II
Course Description:

This course investigates fundamental questions regarding the nature, value, and capacities of the human person and serves also as an introduction to the discipline and subject matter of philosophy. Specifically, we will discuss the idea of what it is to be human, what it is to be an individual, and what it is to be the same individual over time; the phenomenon of human knowing and the nature of mind; the possibility of immortality and the relationship between soul or mind and body; the opposition between freedom and determinism; and the significance of the social dimension of human existence. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Comments:

Prequisite: UCOR 1100
CAST

Common UCOR Course Description:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
This course introduces students to the methods of rigorous philosophical reasoning; introduces students to the philosophical questions, methods, and figures that have played key roles in shaping the Jesuit approach to education and scholarship; and teaches students to critically examine assumptions about reality (especially assumptions about our natures as human beings). Each section explores two or more of the following fundamental philosophical questions: the problem of human knowing, the mind/body problem, the problem of personal identity, the problem of freedom and determinism, and the problem of other persons. This course also aims to develop critical reflective skills to prepare students for more in-depth study in ethics (in the subsequent Ethical Reasoning course), improve critical thinking and writing skills, and enhance students' appreciation for complexity and ambiguity.

Course Type:

UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
Faculty:
Peduti, Douglas