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The Path Less Taken

Written by Mike Thee
March 25, 2015

OK, let's cut right to the chase: Seattle University's 2015 President's Report is now online and available for your perusal. We won't be offended if you go directly to the report. 

 

 

Still reading? Here's a quick synopsis of what's inside the pages.  

Titled "The Path Less Taken," the President's Report is primarily targeted to the university's external stakeholders, however, the report provides those of us "on the inside" an opportunity to revisit and celebrate again our collective achievements from the past year and to imagine the opportunities that await us in the years ahead. 

President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., frames the report by writing: 

"We are a dynamic university intent on going where the need is greatest, moving more purposefully to form professionals and leaders in fields that are critical to the well-being and health of our society-science, technology, engineering, mathematics and health sciences, to name a few. We are expanding access for students in need and new educational opportunities for adults and other non-traditional learners. 

"We are an academic community that insists on uncompromised rigor, excellence in all things and relentless commitment. And all the while, defining and living out what it means to be a Jesuit university in this place and at this time. This is the path we dare to take. Thank you for being part of the journey." 

The report features a number of our colleagues, students and alumni, including among others:

Manivong Ratts, associate professor of counseling in the College of Education, who talks about his research on bullying faced by LGBTQ high school students; Palmyra Jackson, an anthropology and Humanities for Teaching double major in Matteo Ricci College, who discusses her efforts to add cultural competency to the college's curriculum; and alumna Kristi Thorne, who shares how the Albers MBA program prepared her to advance professionally at the Gates Foundation where she serves as program manager in the office of the president in global policy and advocacy. 

Again, here's the link to the report so you can see all of this and more for yourself. If you'd like a printed copy, e-mail tinap@seattleu.edu.