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"Changing the World"

Written by Dean Forbes
March 10, 2015

Seattle University's School of Theology and Ministry has been named to the 2015 list of "Seminaries that Are Changing the World." The recognition comes from the Center for Faith and Service based on the campus of McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago, IL. 

Twenty-six institutions were named in the list of Seminaries Changing the World, with each institution also agreeing to work together to strengthen and advance theological education in the United States. The awards acknowledge some of the most innovative seminaries and schools of theology in the nation and those that also maintain a series of commitments that are transforming theological education as a discipline.

These commitments include robust financial aid to decrease student debt burden and co- opportunities around issues that are most impactful to the world today, such as combating homelessness. The seminaries also have alumni with lower educational debt following their education than the national norm, and have diversity both in their learning communities and in the communities served by the institutions.

The seminaries not only are committed to transforming the world and make the connection betweecurricularn faith and service in the curriculum but also "offer degree programs for a generation of idealists, activists, volunteers and servant-leaders who are committed to community service and social justice," according to the Center for Faith and Service.

"The very title, Seminaries that Change the World, is a provocative reminder of what theological education has meant in the past and what its purpose and promise is for the future. The 2015 class of schools has demonstrated a commitment to invite, welcome, support, train and launch individuals into the world as community leaders," said Rev. Wayne Meisel, director of the Center for Faith and Service.

"We are honored to become part of this consortium with some of the most important theological education institutions in the world, and look forward to working together to promote the importance of this form of education to create a more just and humane world," said Mark Markuly, dean of the School of Theology and Ministry.

"We have worked hard to diversify our educational programming and student body, to become a national leader in ecumenical and interreligious dialogue, to build a renewed commitment to public theology, and to engage the real problems of the world in both our curriculum and educational programming for the community," he said.