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All Things Jesuit

Engaging the world

November 7, 2011

After serving in the Peace Corps, Jason Welle was pretty certain he was being called to the priesthood. What he wasn’t so sure of was what sort of priest he wanted to be. 

For part of his vocational discernment process, Welle did what any reasonable person with a questioning mind—and computer—would do in the early 21st century: he took to the Internet. And the more research he did online, the clearer it became that he belonged with the Jesuits. 

“I knew the Jesuits by reputation only, mainly for their commitment to social justice,” he says. “And I knew I wanted to do something that combined my interest in international development with a deep spirituality and service as a priest. I could see myself fulfilling both of those desires as a Jesuit.” 

Welle entered the Jesuits in 2006. After completing his master’s in philosophy at Fordham University, he joined SU in August. He expects to be here for the next two or three years, for the period of a Jesuit’s formation that is known as regency. During this phase, Jesuits work in a variety of ministries before returning to school for theological studies. 

At SU, Welle is serving as special projects coordinator in Global Engagement. He’s currently working on the office’s website to make it more engaging for SU students interested in studying abroad and prospective international students who might want to enroll here. He’s also researching some potential new exchange partnerships and doing some student advising in Education Abroad. 

For Welle, entering the priesthood was not a completely out-of-leftfield decision. He attended a high school seminary, but left to enroll at UC-Santa Cruz. After earning a degree in community studies, which is a social justice-oriented major, Welle bounced around for a while, working as a travel agent and eventually a flight attendant. He loved the chance to travel and see the world, but after a while, it got old. Welle decided to engage the world in a deeper way. He took a leave of absence from the airline and joined the Peace Corps.  

Placed in Malawi, Welle did field work as a community health volunteer. “The Peace Corps is really where I discovered my vocation to enter the Society,” he says. “Getting out of the U.S. fish bowl, gave me a new perspective on the world and America’s place in it.” 

Welle was in Malawi for 9/11, an experience that he says completely reshaped his view of the world. “I was living in a country where 3,000 people died every week from HIV and AIDS—that’s about what the death toll was in the towers. People there were living at a level of poverty that we just don’t know in the same way here in the U.S. They had hardly even seen a two- or three-story building, much less a 150-story tower. It was just beyond their worldview. 9/11 just sort of awakened me out of a slumber or a complacency about America’s role and my own place in the world.” 

The event was transformative for Welle in other important ways, too. “There’s a lot of downtime in Peace Corps, especially in Malawi, where there’s 12 hours of night, without a television and not much radio. I became very introspective. I think, without realizing it, I was praying, really yearning to understand who I was.” 

A Jesuit usually applies to either the province where he’s living at the time or the province where he’s from. When Welle applied, he was living in Washington, D.C., but didn’t feel a strong connection to the area. “I’m from California, so it would’ve been natural for me to join that province, but since I was looking on the Internet and didn’t really understand the provincial system, I was reading about the Oregon Province and its historic relationship with the Province of Zambia-Malawi. So that connection is what first drew me in this direction.” 

For Welle, his enjoyment of hiking and interest in skiing (which he plans to take up this winter) are added benefits to living in the Northwest. He’s just as well-suited to SU, saying that the care the university gives to individual students was readily apparent from the conversations he had with faculty and staff during his interview. “You don’t find that in a lot of universities, and even at a lot of Jesuit universities, it’s not as strong (a commitment) as it is here.” 

SU’s eco-friendly ethic is also not lost on Welle. “Especially from my time in the Peace Corps, I developed a really strong awareness of sustainability issues, and I’m really impressed with the way Seattle U has made that a priority and incorporated so many things into its basic operations.”

The journey to Yes

October 26, 2011

Some Jesuits take a fairly straight path to their vocations. For others…well, not so much. Lorenzo Herman would fall into the second category, having come to his calling by way of a somewhat circuitous route. 

Herman, who arrived at SU this summer as a scholastic to study in the School of Theology and Ministry, was raised a Baptist and spent the first part of his life in Georgia. His family relocated to Cleveland, and while he was still in middle school, he was strongly encouraged to attend St. Ignatius, the city’s Jesuit high school. He did, and got very involved in campus ministry, even helping to lead retreats. 

When Herman was a senior in high school, he was invited to dinner at the Jesuit residence. To Herman, it was simply an opportunity to see the newly built house and get a good meal. His hosts had something else in mind. They started talking about vocations and asked Herman and the other classmates who were attending the dinner to consider becoming Jesuits. 

“This was bizarre for me,” Herman remembers. “For one, I wasn’t Roman Catholic, and number two, I thought, ‘Maybe there’s something wrong with me that they think I don’t want to get married and have kids.’” 

Herman let the Jesuits know he was not Roman Catholic. “They said, ‘Yeah, we know. We’ll take care of that later.’” 

Driving home that evening with his mother, he told her about the invitation. She asked what he thought. “I don’t want to be a priest,” he replied. “But maybe I’ll be Catholic.”  

The following year, 1993, Herman went through the Right of Christian Initiation of Adults program at Spring Hill College where he was a student and was confirmed as a Roman Catholic. For financial reasons, he had to leave the Jesuit college in Mobile, Ala., and wound up enlisting in the Air Force.  

He was stationed at Fairchild Air Force Base just outside of Spokane. Although he was right in Gonzaga University’s backyard, Herman didn’t realize the school was Jesuit. It was only when he started doing theater in Spokane in the late 1990s that he became acquainted with a few Jesuits, including Jack Bentz, S.J., current adjunct professor in Fine Arts. Herman started asking questions about becoming a Jesuit. Bentz put him in touch with the vocation director, Steve Lantry, S.J.  

Herman decided to apply to be a Jesuit. “But I had a lot of anxieties about it. I was losing sleep.” Venturing further into the discernment process, Herman came to see he wasn’t quite ready to jump from one highly structured organization (the military) to another (the Society of Jesus). He needed some time to enjoy his newfound freedom. 

Just as he was coming to that realization, Herman received a call from Father Lantry. “He said, ‘I’ve got good news and bad news, Lorenzo,’” Herman remembers. Lantry delivered the bad news first—Herman’s application was deferred. 

“I was relieved,” he says, laughing and leaning in as if to convey a secret. “That wasn’t bad news to me.”  

The good news was that he could enter the following year. But that didn’t happen either. Herman wound up moving to San Diego, where he worked for an HIV-AIDS health clinic and served as board president for a nonprofit organization. He joined a local parish that, unbeknownst to him, was run by the Jesuits. “I was thinking, ‘OK, I just can’t get away from the Jesuits.’” 

He found his work and life rewarding. “But there was something that was still missing.” In 2006, he called Lantry to say he wanted to reapply to the Jesuits. “Well, I’ve been waiting,” Lantry told Herman, before sending him the PDF of the application.  

“This time, I was yearning (to join the Jesuits), I was impatient with the process and was like, ‘Let’s do this now!’” 

One of the most meaningful experiences Herman has had as a Jesuit so far is the 30-day silent retreat, on which he was invited to reflect upon the question, “Who am I?”  

“I didn’t know much about my family history. I could only go back to my grandparents. I think that’s common for many African Americans because most of us don’t know where our family came from because of slavery. The fruit of the Spiritual Exercises was for me to do my genealogy, and it’s still ongoing. I’ve gone back to the 1700s for my African ancestry and back to the 15th century for my European ancestry." Herman has learned that he is descended from slaves on both sides of his family. 

“The graces of that retreat are still working through me now as I learn more about not just who I am but my family and discover God’s graces and movements even in traumatic events like my family’s history, and dealing with the tensions of living with the questions and not having all the answers. This has been very important in the development of my identity as a Jesuit.” 

Having earned his B.A. in philosophy and African studies, Herman is now enrolled in the School of Theology and Ministry’s Transformational Leadership program. He feels very much at home.  

“I think what makes Seattle U and STM so special is that people from all kinds of backgrounds feel welcome to come here, even if they’re not Catholic. I just find that very amazing. I would argue that what Seattle U is doing is frontier ministry. We’re working with people who are not Catholic, or may not be Christian, and finding a way to build relationships so we can find God in our own personal experiences.  

“That’s how I became Catholic. When I was in high school, I was never proselytized or told I had to be one. It was always just an open invitation to participate, and that was part of my conversion experience. I always felt welcome at the table. So being here in this way, reminds me of my introduction into the Catholic faith through the Jesuit lens.” 

In his spare time, Herman likes to cook, hike, write poetry and act. He took up the violin a couple years ago. And yet what he most enjoys doing is likely to surprise you.  

“People may consider this mundane, but I really enjoy organizational development work. I like to write grants and bylaws and do strategic planning.” 

Following Ignatius

October 11, 2011

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a pilgrim? Well, here’s your chance. 

Faculty and staff are invited to literally follow in the footsteps of St. Ignatius of Loyola this spring as Pat O’Leary, S.J., and Natch Ohno, S.J., lead a pilgrimage through Spain to visit the sites that were pivotal in the Jesuit founder’s spiritual awakening and formation. 

"The pilgrimage is a way of grounding the Ignatian experience in the places where St. Ignatius lived and moved,” says Father O’Leary, chaplain for alumni and staff, who has been leading trips like this for years. “The pilgrimage provides a concrete connection to the graces and movements that many people find in Ignatian spirituality.” 

Over 12 days this March, (14-25), Fathers O’Leary and Ohno will lead a group of pilgrims, as they are called, on a journey that includes such destinations as Loyola, where Ignatius was raised, Pamplona, where he took part in a battle that left him seriously wounded and questioning his purpose in life, and Montserrat and Manresa, where Ignatius’s spirituality was shaped. 

The pilgrimage will resonate with those who are connected in some way with Ignatian spirituality, whether they’ve been working at a Jesuit institution such as Seattle University or involved with a Jesuit parish or some other ministry associated with the order.  

For those just beginning to acquaint themselves with the life of Ignatius, O’Leary says the trip can provide an entrée to Ignatian spirituality. Indeed, it is not uncommon for a pilgrim to begin meeting with a spiritual director or to make the Spiritual Exercises after going on the trip. 

Yet it’s not just “beginners” who find value in the pilgrimage. The more seasoned Ignatian veterans who go on the trip often come away with a heightened appreciation for the man whose spirituality is so central to the Jesuit mission. 

Before going on his pilgrimage in 2006, Le Xuan Hy, associate professor of psychology, was already well-versed in the life and spirituality of Ignatius. “I had visited Loyola a decade before, took the complete (30-day) Spiritual Exercises three times, and directed others through it, so I thought I knew Ignatius. 

“Yet Ignatius and his ‘great desires’ came alive in Fr. Pat, at each and every location, from the battle scene at Pamplona, to the Casa Loyola, to the magnificent cliffs of Monserrat and the Black Madonna before whom Ignatius made the grand offering of his life and, finally, to the little town of Manresa where he experienced grounding and transformation that opened mind and heart to ‘the greater glory of God.’” 

Mary-Antoinette Smith, associate professor of English and director of Women Studies, went on the 2010 pilgrimage with a similarly deep background in Ignatian spirituality, having made three- and five-day silent retreats, the nine-month Spiritual Exercises in Everyday Life (SEEL) retreat and most recently, the 30-day Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius. Still, the journey in Spain brought new texture to her experience.  

“As someone who has consistently participated in many things Ignatian over the past 18 years,” she says, “the chance to visit firsthand the places where St. Ignatius was wounded, transformed, converted and inspired to found the Society of Jesus for the purpose of spreading the Good News, ‘Ad majorem Dei Gloriam,’ was illuminating. It was a grace-filled experience that I recommend enthusiastically to others as an enriching opportunity.” 

For Hy, the experience in Spain continues to sustain him spiritually. “The pilgrimage grows dearer for me. I am still drawing deeper from Fr. Pat’s talks and the images, both physical and mental. Can I go again?” 

SU Jesuits: 2011 edition

September 27, 2011

Members of SU's Arrupe Community gathered for their annual photo on Sept. 21. 

Back row (left to right): Dave Anderson (Alumni Relations), Bob Grimm (Sabbatical), Josef Venker (Chair, Fine Arts), Pat Kelly (Theology, Study of Sport), Steve Sundborg (President), Dave Leigh (English)  

Second row (left to right): Peter Ely (VP Mission and Ministry), Jim Reichmann (Philosophy Emeritus, Pastoral Ministry), Hugh Duffy (English, Theology), Mike Bayard (Director, Campus Ministry), Eric Watson (Chemistry), Tom Murphy (History), Pat O’Leary (University Chaplain), Natch Ohno (Student Development, Assistant Rector), Fernando Álvarez Lara (Hispanic Ministry, Doctoral candidate, San Francisco Theological Seminary) 

Front row (left to right): James Taiviet Tran (Boeing Engineer, Vietnamese pastoral ministry), Matthew Pyrć (Campus Ministry), Jason Welle (Global Engagement), Pat Howell (Rector, Professor of Pastoral Theology), Lorenzo Herman (STM Student), Jean Baptiste Ganza (MBA student), Mike Kelliher (Criminology) 

Absent: Emmett Carroll (Pastor, Bainbridge), Bob Egan (Pastoral Ministry), John Foster (Matteo Ricci College, English), Ron Funke (Pastoral Ministry), John Topel (Pastor, Port Townsend), Pat Twohy (Superior Rocky Mountain Mission, Urban Native American Ministry), Bill Watson (Director, Sacred Story Institute)

Jesuit jubilarians

September 27, 2011

A special Mass was held Sept. 25 at the Chapel of St. Ignatius to honor the four SU Jesuits celebrating jubilee anniversaries this year. From left to right, Pat Howell, S.J., rector of the Arrupe Community, entered the Jesuits 50 years ago; Dave Anderson, S.J., chaplain for alumni, became a Jesuit 25 years ago; Pat O’Leary, S.J., chaplain for faculty and staff, was ordained 50 years ago; and Steve Sundborg, S.J., president, entered the order 50 years ago. 

Read THE HOMILY that Father Howell delivered at the Mass. 

 

Catching up with Joe Orlando

September 13, 2011

Assistant Vice President for Mission and Ministry Joe Orlando is back at SU, recharged, ready to go and even more convinced that Jesuit education is at its best when it’s global. Orlando, his wife Carla and twin 12-year-old daughters spent last year in Italy, where Joe and Carla did campus ministry work for Gonzaga University’s study abroad program in Florence. The opportunity was presented by Pat Burke, dean of the program who previously worked with the Orlandos at SU. Father Burke wanted to create a more pastoral presence for the Florence program which enrolls about 150 students. With SU’s blessing, Joe took a leave of absence from the university, and he and Carla provided retreats and service experiences, coordinated liturgy planning, did music ministry and collaborated with Jesuit who traveled from Rome to say Mass on Sundays.  At the request of The Commons, Joe recently sat down to explain why he went to Florence, what he got out of the experience and what it was like to relocate his family for the year. 

The Commons: So, why did you do this? 

Joe Orlando: After 20 years working here, it was really a good time to take a leave from SU. I needed to refresh myself professionally and personally and then come back with renewed creative energy. That was my aspiration going into it. I’m very grateful Peter Ely (vice president for Mission and Ministry) and Father Sundborg (president) and Jen Tilghman-Havens and my colleagues in Mission and Ministry who stepped up and said, “We can support you in this unique moment.” 

The Commons: And were your aspirations realized? 

   
Carla and Joe Orlando, with their daughters (left to right) Sophia and Josephine, as they make their way back home after a yearlong adventure in Florence, Italy. 

Joe Orlando: Yes. I feel excited to be back. I feel like I’ve learned a great deal. It was very important culturally for me to connect with my heritage—I’m half Italian. I had studied in Florence as an undergraduate and that was a very significant point in my academic career, so it actually meant a lot to be working with students at the exact point in their career that I now look back and say, “That was a pivot point for me in looking a the world in a different way—thinking about language, culture and the global community.” Now (in Florence), I was able to work with students as a campus minister in such a way that I could accompany them on their own journeys. It was really a beautiful full circle. 

It also strengthened my passion for the global dimension of Jesuit higher education. I met with the interim secretary for Jesuit higher education who is located in Rome and had the chance to learn more about what’s going on globally for Jesuit institutions in all the different countries around the world. I also did some research around that topic and became more interested in that. So at a time when SU is making a stronger commitment to global engagement, I have become even more energized and invested in that aspect of our trajectory as an institution.   

The Commons: You originally came to SU as a campus minister, and over time your work has put you more in contact with faculty and staff. In working with students in the Florence program, it seems you were getting back to your roots, in a sense. 

Joe Orlando: Yes. I really enjoyed the opportunity to reconnect with students in an important way. I love working with faculty and staff, but this was a way to have a lot of contact with students at an important time in their lives and that was renewing, too. 

The Commons: What was it like for your family to spend a year in a different country? 

Joe Orlando: It was a really special experience for me, my wife Carla and our twin 12-year-old daughters. I feel like it gave us a chance to become closer as a family and to share in having our lives enriched. We saw a great deal of art and architecture and sculpture and heard a lot of music and really got a sense of the tastes of Italy. We were all in this little adventure together, which was unifying. Here (in Seattle) our circles are expanded—which is healthy—but for this year in Italy it was special to get a chance to walk in and see something significant together.  

The Commons: You didn’t get sick of each other? 

Joe Orlando: Well…we came close. (Laughs) Let’s just say the girls are really looking forward to being back with their peers. We home-schooled them (in Italy) so they’re happy to back at school with their friends. 

The Commons:  After spending a year in Florence and, as you said, connecting with your Italian heritage, do you find that you’re now talking with your hands a lot more? 

Joe Orlando:(Laughs—and throws up his hands) Totally! 

Layperson's terms

August 29, 2011

Here's a trivia question: How many Jesuit institutions in the United States are currently led by non-Jesuits? You can find the answer in The Chronicle of Higher Education, which recently ran an article on the growing trend of laypersons and other men and women outside of the Jesuit order becoming presidents of Jesuit colleges and universities. It's an interesting read--check it out here.

God's approval rating?

August 13, 2011

James Martin, S.J., dubbed chaplain of "The Colbert Report" on Comedy Central, made a return to the show where he was asked by host Stephen Colbert, among other questions, why it is that God's approval ratings are low.

Father Martin, culture editor of America magazine, is coming to Seattle University in February as a keynote speaker for the School of Theology and Ministry's fourth annual Search for Meaning Pacific Northwest Spirituality Book Festival. You can read more about the book festival at STM.

Doing business the Ignatian way?

August 3, 2011

What if America’s businesses operated according to Ignatian principles? So asks John Levesque, in the August edition of Seattle Business, inspired by his time on SU’s campus as a student in our Master of Fine Arts program. 

Levesque’s article features Chris Lowney, left, who left the Jesuits to work at a J.P. Morgan and later wrote Heroic Leadership: Best Practices from a 450-Year-Old Company that Changed the World. Published in 2003, the book delves into lessons from St. Ignatius and the early Jesuits that are applicable to the business world.  

Lowney was the featured speaker at the National Jesuit Student Leadership Conference that SU hosted in 2008. A month before coming to campus, he spoke about his book in an interview with the university’s faculty and staff newsletter, explaining: “In a world that sometimes seems to believe that the only way to become successful is to shun principle, [the Jesuits’] approach to living and working shows how we might be principled people and be successful in our efforts.” 

Today, Lowney is president of Jesuit Commons, an organization working to bring the riches of Jesuit education to the poorest and most marginalized people of the world, particularly those living in refugee camps. 

Levesque himself sings the praises of Jesuit education in his Seattle Business article, writing, “What has struck me about my exposure to Jesuit education is that no one has tried to proselytize me. Or sell me basketball tickets. Instead, I’ve been encouraged to be myself, always with an eye toward intellectual engagement centered on leadership, social justice and service to others.”

Into Africa: Jesuit business schools

July 27, 2011

Establishing Jesuit business schools in four African nations is a top priority for African Jesuits, Albers School of Business and Economics Dean Joe Phillips shared on his blog after attending the International Association of Jesuit Business Schools 17th World Forum  in Lima, Peru, this month. 

As Dean Phillips wrote, there is not a single Jesuit business school anywhere on the African continent, and there’s only 781 business schools in Africa, total. (That's out of more than 13,000 schools worldwide). The Jesuit African Initiative is now working to create business schools in Kenya, the Congo, Ivory Coast and Rwanda/Burundi, with Ron Anton, S.J., secretary for higher education for the Society of Jesus, heading up the effort. 

As for other highlights from the forum, Dean Phillips was elected to the association’s board of directors. He will be one of five deans from the U.S. on the board. Albers was well-represented at the conference: Bill Weis, professor of management, and Meena Rishi, associate professor of economics gave presentations related to the forum's decidedly Ignatian theme, “Corporate Social Responsibility and Inclusive Business."

The Greg turns 450

July 18, 2011

In 1551, 450 years ago, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus, started a “School of Grammar, Humanity and Christian Doctrine” in Rome. It was the first of what would become an extensive network of colleges and universities, recognized throughout the world for their excellence and grounding in Ignatian spirituality. This first school, which originally was called the “Roman College,” today is known as the Gregorian University—or “The Greg” for short. The Roman College "became the model for all the subsequent colleges in Europe," says Pat Howell, S.J., rector of Arrupe House. You can learn more about this important milestone and The Greg today at National Jesuit News

Speaking of the founder of the Jesuits...A local architect has named Seattle University's Chapel of St. Ignatius the best building in Seattle. Visit Capitol Hill Seattle Blog to read what he had to say about the spiritual heart of our campus. 

Father Janowiak signs off

June 14, 2011

Paul Janowiak, S.J., of the School of Theology and Ministry has been asked by the Jesuits to go to the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara in Berkeley, Calif. This is the second time, Father Janowiak has responded to the Jesuits' call to leave SU. He previously left STM to become Socius with the Oregon Province. He returned to SU in 2008 and was appointed the first holder of the Patrick J. Howell, S.J., Professor of Theology and Ministry. 

In the midst of all the usual busyness that goes along with the end of the academic year, as well as preparing for his move and finishing off the final galleys of his forthcoming book, Father Janowiak took a few moments to share some thoughts on what’s ahead and to reflect on his time at SU. Here’s what he said. 

On his new role:  

JST is one of the two theology centers in the United States, along with the School of Theology and Ministry at Boston College. I will be assuming the position of associate professor of liturgical studies and will be replacing the Jesuit who will be returning to Fordham University after seven years of service at Berkeley. 

On what he’ll be teaching:  

My teaching will cover much the same areas as my work here at the School of Theology and Ministry at SU. However, the ecumenical schools that compose the Graduate Theological Union are more self-contained, as opposed to the thoroughly ecumenical environment here at STM. Two other differences are most apparent in comparison to our school at SU: besides the lay student population, JST is a theology center where the Jesuits send their young men in preparation for ordination.  I will be asked to teach courses that relate to celebrating the Eucharist and other sacramental liturgies of the Church. For example, this fall I will teach a course on the theology and pastoral practice of hearing confessions. Secondly, JST offers theological degrees that prepare students to teach in theology and seminary settings throughout the world, as well as pursue doctoral degrees in theology. There are a good number of lay people and young Jesuits from around the world who come to Berkeley to pursue that degree. The relationship with Cal Berkeley allows students to do a lot of interdisciplinary study in conjunction with their theological interests.   

On how he’ll look back on his time at SU and what he’ll take away from the experience:  

I never wanted to leave here; it was a request in religious obedience, in response to the needs of the Society. This is what I vowed my life to be. At the same time, I think STM provides one of the most creative and balanced theology and ministry experiences in the country. We do not go home to our own tents. We have to wrestle with diversity in theological, multicultural and denominational  perspectives in a way that corresponds with the way the world really is. The formation and pastoral elements that accompany all STM’s programs speak to the need for ministers who appreciate that the integration of one’s spiritual and relational identity shapes the way one serves others and opens up the liberating call of the Gospel. 

In addition, the Pacific Northwest is my Jesuit home, and my brothers at Arrupe and in the Oregon Province are clearly some of the most prayerful and committed men I have ever known. I will never lose that connection and I am only glad that Berkeley is close enough to keep that strong bond with these good companions. With men like the Arrupe Jesuits, who often work tirelessly in the background, laboring for students in the spirit of our dear Roger Gillis, I am so honored to have lived and prayed with these Jesuits. I hope the wider university appreciates them also. 

On his hopes for SU in the years ahead:  

Seattle University has expanded in vision and stature so much since I first came in 1996.  The commitment to educating the whole person and providing opportunities to discover faith that seeks justice as a context for a liberal arts education are so meaningful to me. I would hope that SU does not lose that human and religious character in order to score stature points in the academy and the secular elite. As you know, the Core discussions and assessment criteria all year have surfaced the tension around that issue. It is not easy to be a Catholic and Jesuit university in these days, while also upholding what Jesuit humanistic study has always maintained, i.e. that the world is good, open for inquiry and exploration, and that the matters of the soul can be in healthy dialogue with the concerns of the mind. I hope we never get lured away from that kind of wonder. I think the temptation to quantify and rein in awe is great in these days. I am all for raising up wonder and awe.  

Other thoughts:   

My connection with the Chapel of St. Ignatius from the day it opened has been a powerful, daily nourishment for me. It is an amazing house of prayer, empty or full. It summons people who have not been inside a church for years. It is the students’ doorway into a mature religious commitment. People pray there faithfully in the middle of all the feverish activity. I cannot say enough about the gift of the chapel. I will miss lighting a candle there every day. However, one thing I will not miss is the quarter system. Thank God, JST is on the semester system! God has finally heard the plea of my old age!