Faculty Funding and Fellowships

a group of former faculty fellows, a presentation on community emgagement and a staff person engaged in service at Washington Middle School

Academic Service-Learning Faculty Fellows  

Academic Service-Learning Fellows explore the theory and practice of academic service-learning and how to integrate this methodology into their courses. Fellows receive a stipend and curriculum resources focused on the use of service-learning as a pedagogy. Fellows meet regularly throughout the year to support each other in the process of revising a syllabus to include service-learning, teach the revised course, and conduct an action research project in which they collect data to answer a research question related to the student learning or community impacts aspects of their new course. Faculty new to service-learning as well as experienced practitioners are welcome. The Academic Service-Learning Fellows Program is open to all faculty, tenure track and non-tenure track.

Community Engaged Research Fellowship

The CCE offers summer and academic year fellowships for faculty to support community engaged research that demonstrates a clear connection to issues relating to Yesler Terrace and/or surrounding neighborhoods and one of the following six areas: affordable housing, education, health, environment, arts, or economic opportunity. Applicants must name a community partner in their project proposal. Click here to browse the Clearinghouse on ConnectSU for research needs identified by our partner organizations.

Faculty Seminar on Power, Privilege, and Community Engagement

University community engagement frequently raises thorny issues relating to power and privilege. Community-based research challenges faculty to form authentic relationships with communities that are different from their own, but we are often ill-prepared for the cultural differences and power dynamics we encounter. Service-learning, which is intended to benefit communities while enhancing student learning, can cause faculty and students to worry they are doing more harm in the community than good. How can we prepare ourselves and our students to be more effective and ethical in our community engagement?

This seminar is geared toward faculty who are already involved in community engagement, whether through teaching or scholarship. We will examine issues of identity, race, power, and privilege, all from the perspective of doing community engagement with a social justice framework. Read more details on ConnectSU. 

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