Arts and Sciences events highlight social justice

Written by Karen L. Bystrom
April 28, 2017

Scan the Seattle University campus calendar and you immediately see the many and varied events offered across the College of Arts and Sciences during Spring Quarter. Opportunities abound in visual and performing arts, lectures, symposia, book launches, awards and more.

Among this spring’s events, several highlight the integration of social justice into Seattle University’s mission and vision, including these three, all free and open to the public.

Dr. Tony Greenwald: The Selling of ‘Implicit Bias’

May 4, 12:30-1:30 p.m., Le Roux Room (STCN 160)

Dr. Tony GreenwaldThe concept of implicit bias is being sold both by psychologists bringing applications to public attention and by commercial interests offering to cure the damages implicit biases can cause.  A byproduct of any scientific work being propagated beyond its originating disciplines is that non-experts will generate pseudo-knowledge that lacks solid empirical roots.  This talk describes both what is solidly established empirically and misconceptions that are best dispelled.

Activism is Our Heritage: Celebrating Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and Activism

May 15, 5:30-7 p.m., with reception to follow, Pigott Auditorium

Miriam Yeung, former Executive Director of the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum at a protest with Congresswoman Pramila JayapalOpening Remarks: Dr. Hye-Kyung Kang; Director SU MSW Program. Keynote: Miriam Yeung, former Executive Director of the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum and Activist-in-Residence, Smith College 2017 (pictured with Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal.)


Many do not realize that Asian Pacific American (APA) communities (especially in the West Coast and most definitely in Seattle) have a long and vibrant history of activism. We focus on APA activism in honor of APA Heritage Month. The stereotype of Asian Pacific Americans as "quiet" is one of the most pernicious manifestations of the Model Minority Myth. It renders the needs of our communities invisible. It diminishes our political power. It isolates us from communities of solidarity we need to be building. And it results in the internalization of the traumas our communities are surviving.

Co-sponsored by Prof. Natasha T. Martin, JD, Associate Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer (Office of Institutional Inclusion), Prof. Sharon Suh, PhD; Pigott-McCone Endowed Chair, and Asian Counseling and Referral Services.

Dr. Charles W. Mills:  Liberalism and Racial Justice

Seattle University Department of Philosophy Endowed Lecture

May 17, 6:30 p.m., Pigott Auditorium

Charles W. Mills, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, City University of New York Graduate CenterCharles W. Mills, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, City University of New York Graduate Center, works in the general area of social and political philosophy, particularly in oppositional political theory as centered on race, class, and gender. His latest work, Black Rights/White Wrongs: The Critique of Racial Liberalism, was published by Oxford University Press (2017).

His first book, The Racial Contract (1997), won a Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award. He is also the author of Blackness Visible: Essays on Philosophy and Race (1998), From Class to Race: Essays in White Marxism and Black Radicalism (2003); Contract and Domination (co-authored with Carole Pateman, 2007), and Radical Theory, Caribbean Reality: Race, Class and Social Domination (2010).

Supported by the Philosophy Club and Global African Studies Program.