Marylou Sena, PhD

PhD, Philosophy

Associate Professor, Philosophy

Phone: 206.296.5349

Building/Room: Casey 424



Dr. Marylou Sena received her doctorate from DePaul University in 1988 and joined the Seattle University faculty in 1989. Dr. Sena was among the founders of the Women's Studies program.  She is also a member of the faculty of Seattle University's Matteo Ricci College.  Specializing in 19th- and 20th-century Continental philosophy, she has taught courses on philosophy of the human person, ethics, tragedy and mimesis, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Greek philosophy and Senior Synthesis.She is the recipient of the College of Arts and Sciences Award for excellence in teaching (1992).

Selected Publications

"Nietzsche's New Grounding of the Metaphysical: Sensuousness and Its Subversion of Plato and Platonism," Research in Phenomenology, 2004.
"The Phenomenal Basis of Entities and the Manifestation of Being According to Sections 15-17 of Being and Time: On the Pragmatist Misunderstanding," Heidegger Studies 11 (1995).
"Dionysos as Antidote: The Veils of Maya," Research in Phenomenology 24 (1994).

"The Tragic Voice of the Feminine and its Significance for Phenomenology" in Blosser, P., ed, Japanese and Western Phenomenology, Kluwer, 1993.

Selected Presentations

"The Historical Roots of Modernity: Plato on the Derivative Form of Mantic Madness", Word and Disclosure: Philosophy/Literature Conference, Florence, Italy, 2009.

"Nietzsche on the Middle World of Art: Its Origin (Ursprung) in Dionysus," Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy, Denver, 1998.
"Tragedy and Feminine Pathology: A Mimetic Retrieval," Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy, Chicago, 1995.
"The Veils of Maya: Dionysus as Antidote," Japanese-American Phenomenology Conference, Seattle University, 1991.

"The Place of Truth in Being and Time," 24th annual meeting of the Heidegger Conference, 1990.

 Professional Affiliations

Conference of Heidegger Scholars
Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy
Nietzsche Society
American Philosophical Association