SU Voice Alumni Blog

Albers Center for Business Ethics

Posted by Amanda Kelly on June 13, 2011 at 9:06 AM PDT

 On June 3rd we held the launch for our Center for Business Ethics.  John Dienhart, the Frank Shrontz Endowed Chair in Business Ethics, is directing the center and taking the lead in organizing.  He has been ably assisted this year by his graduate student assistant, Aaron Hayden.  Faculty, staff, students, advisory board members, and other supporters gathered for the launch ceremony.

As a business school at a Jesuit, Catholic university, Albers has long placed an emphasis on business ethics, and in more recent decades, social responsibility, and in the last decade, sustainability.  Since the Albers School was founded in 1947, a concern for ethics and values has been part of our DNA and it has been part of the student experience for decades.

The overarching theme of the center will be the importance of creating an ethical business culture in organizations.  Key activities of the center will include assisting Albers faculty with integrating ethics and social responsibility into the classes they teach, as well as organizing workshops and conferences that bring together academics and practitioners to address ethical issues.

Read more from Dean Joe Phillips.

 

Fr. Dave's Room with a View

Posted by Amanda Kelly on June 9, 2011 at 3:06 PM PDT

 When I was a freshman at Gonzaga University I was struggling to complete a philosophy paper which was due at 8 am the next morning. I remembered meeting Fr. David Leigh, S.J., at a student-family event a few months prior. Because he was an English professor and a Jesuit, I called him around 10 p.m. at Jesuit House to see if he could help me. He surprisingly picked up his phone and said, “Sure, meet me at the front door of Jesuit House and we can look at it.” We only spent about 15 minutes on my paper, but four years later this short time with Fr. Leigh became the center of my discernment about my future. I decided to enter the Jesuit Novitiate in Portland, Ore. largely because of Jesuits like Fr. Leigh who were always available to me and taught me much about generosity.

Two years ago Fr. Pat O’Leary approached me and asked if I’d consider changing rooms with him. He had been living in Campion Residence Hall for over 20 years, and I was in the Arrupe Jesuit residence. He thought I might make better connections with the students since I am closer to their age. I was reluctant at first, but he encouraged me to take his key and look at his room. When I did, it took me only one minute to decide that I had found my future home.

Campion is on First Hill – the room has the kind of amazing view you can only imagine! It has been two years since I moved in and it has been a great place to come home to after a day’s work. I live on an all women’s floor of 70 frosh, and I’m never quite sure what I’ll encounter when I step onto the floor from the elevator. I’ve seen women dancing, singing, crying and studying in the lounge and hallway. I’m sure I’d never have these kinds of connections with students if I lived in another place.

I recall a promise I made to God and myself when I entered the Jesuits: that more than anything else, I wanted to be generous and serve others. Like Fr. Leigh who has lived in Bellarmine Hall for 28 years, I too have devoted some of my evenings to editing papers for the women on my floor and for players on the men’s basketball team, for whom I am a Chaplain. I assure them that I cannot write the papers for them, but I am happy to correct punctuation and sentence structure to make their papers a little more readable. One might think this is a burden late at night, but a little help goes a long way and gives me a window into their lives.

One of our Jesuit phrases is “the service of faith and the promotion of justice.” For me, this means engaging with people each day in face-to-face conversations to discover where they are and how they are. Oftentimes, these interactions go deep into what people are thinking and feeling and our deepest desires are revealed. My daily encounters with our students, alumni, faculty and staff are opportunities to live out our Jesuit mission of loving and serving others as God loves and serves us.

Fr. Dave Anderson, S.J.
Chaplain for Alumni

 

 

Notes From Your New Assistant VP of Alumni!

Posted by Amanda Kelly on June 3, 2011 at 8:06 AM PDT

  Dear Alumni and Friends –  

I am filled with great pride to be back at Seattle University!   I have just finished my first week as the new Associate VP of Alumni Relations.  Seattle University plays an important role in my life and I am extremely excited to be back at SU, bringing tremendous passion and enthusiasm for the university and for the role that Alumni Relations plays in the future of SU.  I can’t think of anything better than representing my alma mater and the 60,000+ alumni of Seattle University! 

As I drive into work every day I find myself smiling as I realize that I get to go to a place that I take great pride in and know that I have the privilege to be in my dream job of working across our university, our community and with our alumni.  My role will be a connector, bringing the great resources our alumni, faculty and university has together that will bring awareness to the great opportunities SU has to offer.  

While I have only had one week in the job, I do know that Alumni Relations wants to be a resource for our alumni efforts by providing awareness of opportunities and empowering alumni to build a strong network.  There are great alumni doing great things every day, around the world.  We want to provide an on-going cadre of leadership from alumni and friends of the University that will involve our alumni in meaningful ways with Seattle University.  

Seattle University has been a tremendous personal and professional resource to me.  My goal is to ensure that others have that opportunity through our alumni network to utilize all that Seattle University has to offer. 

I look forward to our work together on behalf of our students, our alumni and our community. 

Sincerely,  

Susan, ’90, ‘10 

 

26 days to go… Support the Challenge!

Posted by Amanda Kelly on June 2, 2011 at 2:06 PM PDT

 With less than a month to go to meet the 600+ Challenge, we need your help! So far, 450alumni have made gifts to support Seattle University students. If 150 more alumni give back to SU, three trustees will donate $15,000 to provide scholarships and enhance academic programs for today's students. We need your help to support these students and their classmates as they work to achieve their educational and professional goals.

Every gift, no matter what size, counts toward our goal of 600! Rudy needs YOU to join in the Challenge! Show your SU spirit and make a gift today! If you’ve already given, thanks very much. Your support is truly appreciated!

P.S. Check out what Rudy the Redhawk, the Most Interesting Mascot in the World, thinks about the 600+ Challenge.

 

Year in Review: Q & A with SU President Stephen Sundborg, S.J.

Posted by Amanda Kelly on June 2, 2011 at 9:06 AM PDT

 President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., recently sat down with Mike Thee of The Commons for his annual interview. The president reflected on the year that was and what's ahead for SU.

The Commons:  From your perspective, what were Seattle University’s proudest moments this year? 

President Sundborg:  The proudest moment, without question, was standing down there in the new plaza, having walked down in a wild procession from Immaculate Conception Church for the opening of the new Library and Learning Commons at the end September. Just what had gone into 10 years of thinking and planning and fundraising and designing…to have it turn out as it did. That opening was an extraordinary moment.

The second proudest moment was being in the editorial board interview with The Seattle Times to explain to them the launching of the Seattle University Youth Initiative, and having them run an editorial, an article and a column. It was gratifying that the initiative just clicked, with everyone recognizing it as a part of Seattle University’s mission, and to get it off the ground with some structure, and to be able to raise some of the money to help support it and get a number of students down at Bailey Gatzert already working there as tutors, teacher’s assistants and so forth—that was a very, very proud moment.

Visit  The Commons to read the full interview.

 

Contemplative Leaders in Action

Posted by Amanda Kelly on May 31, 2011 at 3:05 PM PDT

  

 

Are you looking for a leadership formation opportunity?  Do you want to reconnect with your Jesuit-roots and with other Jesuit-educated alumni?  If so, then the new Magis Contemplative Leaders in Action (CLIA) program could be for you.   

CLIA is two-year cohort program for Jesuit-educated alumni with an integrated focus on faith, leadership and service.  CLIA at Seattle U will be the first cohort on the West Coast and the first to be sponsored at a Jesuit university.  Previous cohorts have been run in Washington DC, Baltimore, New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago.   

I have always been identified as a leader,” said Stephanie Weaver, a CLIA participant and Georgetown alumna who works for the American Red Cross in Princeton, NJ and is also a founder of A Drink For Tomorrow, a foundation raising funds to bring clean water to villages in India.  “There’s still a ton to learn,” she said. 

New York CLIA participant Mark Orrs is a doctoral student in sustainable development at Columbia University and a graduate of St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia. He's found that lessons he's learned about spirituality in the group, via regular monthly meetings and a retreat, have been helpful. "What I've taken from it is the spiritual practices and incorporating them into my daily life," he said. Jesuit meditation and spiritual practices such as the Examen and LectioDivina are part of the program. 

Like Stephanie, if you still have something to learn about leadership and dig the Jesuit tradition, then why not see what CLIA is all about.  Information, FAQs and an application can be found on the Magis website.  Applications are due by Friday, June 17th.  Contact Tom Norwood, Assistant Director of Magis at norwooto@seattleu.edu for questions.   

 

Sacred Sounds: New Organ in the Chapel of St. Ignatius

Posted by Amanda Kelly on May 26, 2011 at 10:05 AM PDT

  This week, a beautiful, custom-made continuo organ was placed in the Chapel of St. Ignatius, in fulfillment of a long-held dream. The organ  made its official public debut at the May 22 Mass at the chapel.  

For some time there had been an interest in acquiring an organ for the chapel. Those ambitions really caught fire in 2008 when the university hosted the Opus Prize. As part of the celebration honoring three humanitarians from around the world, the SU Choir was invited to perform at Benaroya Hall. They wanted to sing “Magnificat,” a song of praise and redemption for the poor, which was fitting for the occasion, but it required a continuo organ to truly do the piece justice. They found an instrument relatively small in stature but still capable of delivering a mighty musical punch. The organ more than amply filled the spacious Benaroya Hall, and the performance inspired a search for a similarly sized and sounding instrument for SU’s chapel.   

Click here to read more, and see the organ in action. 

 

SU Alum Appointed to Irish Senate

Posted by Amanda Kelly on May 25, 2011 at 8:05 AM PDT

  Dr. Katherine Zappone, '76 was recently appointed to be a member of Seanad Éireann, the Irish Senate or upper house of the the Irish Parliament. Katherine was born in Spokane but her family moved to Seattle when she was a child, and she attended St. Luke's, Holy Names and Seattle U before pursuing graduate degrees at Catholic University and Boston College. She has been living in Ireland since the 1980s and is a noted academic and civil rights campaigner, and also a member of Ireland's Human Rights Commission. She and her partner Dr. Ann Louise Gilligan were married in 2003 in Vancouver, BC.

Dr.  Zappone is an academic and a tireless campaigner for equality. She is a member of the Irish Human Rights Commission. She and her wife, Dr Ann Louise Gilligan, run An Cosán which supports individuals and communities to actively engage in the process of social change through transformative education. The couple are also taking their landmark case against the Revenue Commissioners to have their Canadian marriage recognised in Ireland. The case is due to be heard in the Supreme Court later this year.

Katherine Zappone is an educator, public policy and management expert.  She is a Commissioner with the Irish Human Rights Commission, appointed by the Minister for Justice in 2001 and re-appointed in 2006.  As a former CEO of the National Women’s Council of Ireland, she represented its membership in Ireland and internationally, contributed to public policy-making and directed its research programme.  She has also taught ethics, practical theology and education in Trinity College Dublin.  She led and established the Tallaght West Childhood Development Initiative, Ltd, a 10 year strategy and service implementation programme to improve outcomes for children and families, co-funded by the Irish Government and Atlantic Philanthropies.

She has published research in national equality frameworks, effective children’s services, equal opportunity in education, theology and spirituality, and human rights.    Katherine has a PhD (Boston College), MBA (Smurfit Business, UCD) and MA (Catholic University of America), and has completed a recent programme in research methodologies in educational technologies with the Open University in the UK. She has also trained in leadership and mindfulness with Jon Kabat-Zinn.

 

Albers Ranks 4th in Sustainability

Posted by Amanda Kelly on May 20, 2011 at 9:05 AM PDT

  

It's a mark of progress that a series of business-school rankings as influential as that of Bloomberg BusinessWeek includes metrics on sustainability in its annual scores. The magazine last week released its 2011 rankings for business schools. Seattle University landed fourth in sustainability.

Read more.  

 

Seattle U Earns Top Ranking as Green Campus

Posted by Amanda Kelly on May 6, 2011 at 11:05 AM PDT

 Seattle University has been honored once again as one of the country’s top green universities for making environmentally responsible choices and practicing sustainability.   The Princeton Review ranked SU highest of all 28 Jesuit universities nationwide and independent colleges in Washington state. For the second consecutive year, the university received a 94 on a numerical scale of 66-99, based on sustainability-related policies and programs.   


Some of SU’s sustainability practices include:   

Water bottle-free campus  

60 percent of all campus waste is recycled and composted  

On-site composting center where 52,000 pounds of campus kitchen waste annually gets turned into compost that is applied back to the campus landscape  

Green roofs complete with grasses and soil that support other surrounding plants and tree growth  

Gardens where students grow food and donate to those in need  

Rain gardens that collect storm water runoff and remove pollutants  

Solar panels for energy conservation throughout campus and the surrounding neighborhood  

SU has earned 18 awards for its eco-friendly practices. With completion of its new Fitness Center in the fall, the university will have four LEED Gold certified buildings with the Admissions & Alumni Building, the Law School Annex and the Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons.  SU increased the amount of waste composted and recycled by 11 percent in the past year by placing 60 additional compost bins outside buildings, in residence halls and eatery areas. To-go ware from campus restaurants is also compostable.   

“Seattle University’s sustainability programs represent a commitment by our students, faculty and staff and you can see the results the moment you step onto our beautiful campus,” said Executive Vice President Timothy Leary.  “Each year, we are deepening our commitment and we look forward to sharing our expertise in sustainability more widely through partnerships and community engagement.”