SU Voice Alumni Blog

Alumni Spotlight: John Boyle '02

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on September 4, 2013 at 1:09 PM PDT

With football season ready to kick off, John Boyle is the perfect recent alumnus for us to highlight.  John graduated from Seattle University in 2002 with a degree in Economics, but he did not go on to crunch numbers. Instead, he writes about the bone-crunching action of the Seattle Seahawks as the sports reporter for the Everett Herald.

 
As a student, John took elective English classes and spent his senior year working on the Spectator.   “I feel like part of the reason I’m able to have a career in a field unrelated to my major is that Seattle U does a good job encouraging a well-rounded education, regardless of your course of study.”

 
What stands out most to John about his time at Seattle University are the long-lasting friendships he made and the community he built.  While not something John was acutely aware of as a student, he’s felt the impact of the Jesuit-education in his work. It shapes the way he writes about a person-he sees the bigger picture and tries to capture the whole person for his stories.  

 
“I love my job. I get to attend games and be behind the scenes. I’ve covered the Olympics, the Sounders, the Mariners and of course, the Seattle Seahawks. I think what I like most about my job is the variety. I know people who have to do the same thing day to day at their job, but I’ve never experienced that in mine.”

 
 As someone who has a career he loves, his advice to the next generation of Seattle U graduates is  “Pursue something you’re passionate about. You’ll be happier that way.”

 
And for you Seahawks fans, John said that the team is one of the most talented in the NLF and it’s hard to imagine them doing anything but great this season.

Are you an alum that would like to be featured in a recent-alumni spotlight?  Contact us at alumnivoice@seattleu.edu and tell us why you’d make a great story

Alumni & Family Weekend, '63 and '03 Reunions

Posted by Corinne Pann on August 14, 2013 at 12:08 PM PDT

Join us November 1, 2, & 3 for Alumni and Family weekend and 10th and 50th reunion celebrations for the classes of 2003 and 1963.

You are invited back to campus to reconnect with Seattle U friends, see all the changes on campus (a lot has changed even since 2003!), mingle with students, and rekindle your school spirit.

We have a full calendar of events planned for the weekend.  Here are some highlights:

Friday, November 1st, 2013
Legacy Reception 
Are you a Seattle U alum and parent of a current student?  Or were your parents or grandparents also alumni?  We are celebrating our legacy students and alumni at an exclusive reception where we will institute a new family tradition.  Bring your SU students and alumni family members to celebrate Seattle University legacies.

Saturday, November 2nd, 2013
Class of 1963 Golden Reunion Luncheon
Celebrate 50 years!  We need your help to invite classmates and share photos and memories. Volunteer to support your reunion today!

Class of 2003 - 10th Reunion

Come home to celebrate your accomplishments with friends, food and good memories.  We have an evening reception planned, but would like your help planning an after party, inviting classmates and sharing photos.  Sign up to be a reunion volunteer today!

Filipino Alumni Chapter Reunion 
Members of the Filipino Alumni Chapter will return to campus for the Annual FAC Reunion. 

Stay tuned for an official invitation and a full schedule of weekend events. 

Recent Alumni Spotlight: Lauren Cannon Sedillo, '03

Posted by Corinne Pann on August 14, 2013 at 11:08 AM PDT

"I'm really excited to see old friends at our 10th reunion this fall," said Lauren Cannon Sedillo, a 2003 graduate of Seattle University and member of the Alumni Board of Governors.  Sedillo views this not only as an opportunity to reconnect with friends, but as a way to help other alumni reengage with the university.

Though she enjoyed her time at Seattle University, Lauren didn't stay involved right out of college or reflect on what her education had meant to her until she got some distance after graduation, and attended a public university.

Lauren continued her education, getting a masters in classics from the University of Washington. This gave her the opportunity to reflect on her Jesuit education. "At Seattle University there is significantly more emphasis on community outreach.  The need for community service is integrated into each program. It really is about living the mission. The focus is not just on your education, but about how you and your classmates are affecting the world. That's what it means to be Jesuit educated." Lauren has continued to live out the Jesuit mission these last four years, serving on the Executive Leadership Council for HopeLink, a nonprofit based in Redmond.

After a few years away from Seattle U, "I began running into SU community members," said Sedillo, "and started to realize how important those connections to my alma mater were. I wanted to keep those relationships going." It was these chance encounters that lead her to the Alumni Board of Governors. "I told them how I wanted to reconnect and they suggested that the board was a great place to start."

As a board member, Lauren has not only reconnected with Seattle University, but is helping others to do so as well. She is one of the first volunteers for her 2003 class reunion and is looking forward to helping others reconnect with the university and classmates at the reunion.

Are you a class of 2003 graduate? Do you want to join Lauren and help us plan your 10th reunion after party and spread the word to your classmates? Contact the Alumni Relations office

Career Fairs for Alumni Job Seekers and Hiring Companies

Posted by Corinne Pann on August 14, 2013 at 10:08 AM PDT

Are you ready to help the next generation of SU graduates get their professional start? Or maybe you're an alum searching for a new job. Join Career Services at one of the upcoming Career Fairs.

Part-Time Job & Post-Grad Service Fair
Tuesday, September 24, 2013  11 AM - 2 PM

Business & Engineering Career Fair
Tuesday, October 22, 2013  11 AM - 2 PM

Internship Fair
Thursday, February 06, 2014 11 AM - 2 PM

Spring Job and Internship Fair
Tuesday, April 29, 2014 12 AM - 3 PM

Employers, registration is now open for all career fairs. You'll have the opportunity to recruit the best and brightest for your next internship or job opening. We are always looking for enthusiastic alumni to represent their company and to connect with our students. Our students and alumni have a history of professional excellence, leadership and critical thinking skills. Log in to the Redhawk Network  today to post your positions and take the SU Advantage.

Job seekers, our employers have jobs for alumni, too.  At our Career Fairs you'll have the opportunity to meet recruiters and employers from across industries and build your professional network. The Redhawk Network is your online starting place to leverage the power of our greater SU community.  Log in today. 

Geraldine Derig, '63: 50 Years Later - A Reflection

Posted by Corinne Pann on August 13, 2013 at 12:08 PM PDT

In honor of the upcoming 50th reunion for the class of 1963, we are sharing a reflection from Gerri (Geraldine Derig) L. Jackson-Bell. Gerri is a '63 graduate and one of our first 50th reunion volunteers.

Hi, SU Alumni Association members,

I cannot believe this, but I very recently looked up and focused on the wall in my home office. There displayed, with a sketch of  SU’s Arts and Sciences building, is a degree – all in Latin – which essentially reads:

Geraldine Lee Derig

Bachelor of Commerce and Finance

Magna cum Laude

That diploma was signed on June 7, 1963 by Fathers Lemieux, Costello and Kelley.

I haven’t used “Geraldine Lee,” nor my maiden name “Derig” for that matter, for many years. But I kept connected for a number of years as a member of the Alumni Board of Governors, even serving as secretary and vice president.

Seeing our SU Magazine and Susan Vosper’s wonderful article in “Alumni Voice” brought me back to our dedicated Jesuit educators.

I remember in our class of 1963, there were only two of us gals (Joan Berry and myself) who graduated Magna from the School of C&FI believe Joan became a CPA and I was in government administration, judicial court reporting and real estate brokerage for years, before retiring two years ago.

Now I manage my husband, David Bell's, and my small residential apartment buildings. We have travelled to four continents and I do volunteer work, particularly as a Tribunal Advocate for the Archdiocese of Seattle through my Holy Rosary Parish in Edmonds.

I look back so very fondly on my wonderful Seattle U years and I smile with not only loving appreciation of my Jesuit education, but also for the many values that were instilled in me during my four years at Seattle U.

In closing, I wish to congratulate all of my fellow classmates on a very special remembrance from 50 years ago!  Thank you!

Gerri L. Jackson-Bell

Class of 1963!!

If you would like to join Gerri and other dedicated alumni as a Class of 1963 50th Reunion  volunteer, contact the Office of Alumni Relations.  

 

A Road Trip Down Memory Lane

Posted by Corinne Pann on August 9, 2013 at 1:08 PM PDT

Last June, a group of three friends set out on a road trip down memory lane, reconnecting with classmates and their alma mater along the way. Jonathan Eastman,’72, Mike Collins,’72 and Dennis Lou,’72 affectionately called their trip from California to Seattle the “Old Farts Road Trip.” They made stops in California, Oregon and Washington, visiting with college friends on their way back to Seattle University.

At Seattle U, the group stopped by the alumni office and set off on a tour of campus. “We had some students give us a tour. They were great. It was nice to see everything new-the library and the fitness center-while seeing that it remained the same campus I remember.” John Eastman said. John spent four years working in the facilities department as a student. “I knew every inch of campus, so it was really something to return and to meet-up with old classmates and roommates.” John said that the group has remained close over the years, and are now at a point where it’s important to reconnect with old friends and take time out to go see them.

After their campus tour, the group met for a larger reunion at Seattle U’s popular watering hole, the Chieftain. Though not the historic Chieftain that once served as Seattle U’s dining hall, the Irish pub across the street still pays homage to Seattle U’s past. Many of those who returned for this brief reunion had played sports during their time at SU and found old pictures of themselves lining the walls of the Chieftain.

“My time at SU is full of so many great memories. I remember walking on campus, visiting the library and sitting in Pigott Auditorium. The best part of the trip was being welcome backed with open arms.”

John says that he’s returned to Seattle University once every twenty years since his graduation, but now that he’s retired and they’ve made this trip, it could become a yearly tradition.

 Are you planning a trip back to Seattle University? Tell us when-we’d love to tell your story and welcome you home.

Alumni Mentors Needed

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on June 6, 2013 at 12:06 PM PDT

 
Seattle U’s Career Services office is working to develop strong mentor programs, focused on giving Seattle U students and graduates real world experience and a competitive edge in their careers, while providing employers with highly prepared and well informed applicants.
 
Recently, 15 students in pre-health majors were matched with alumni and community members for job shadow experiences in their fields of interest.  Stacy Lu, General Science major participated in hopes of learning more about being a pharmacist.  “This mentor program not only allowed me to meet with a pharmacist, but the manager who oversees all of the other pharmacists. This experience was exactly what I needed because I finally decided that a path in pharmacy is what I want to do.”
 
Stacy’s mentor, Hung Troung, PhD, ’96, pharmacy manager at Virginia Mason Medical Center, encourages other alumni and their employers to participate in the program because “companies have a difficult time finding qualified candidates. By acting as a mentor, you help your organization by creating an individual prepared to fill your position after they graduate.”
 
Whether you live near or far, we need Seattle University alumni to sign up to mentor current students and recent alumni. You can select the activities and amount of time that work for your schedule.  Mentoring can take many different forms such as:

  •     Serving as a panelist on a career-related topic
  •     Conducting mock interviews
  •     Allowing a student or recent graduate shadow you at your job.
  •     Offering resume feedback
  •     Providing informational interviews
  •     Contributing content for articles and blogs


To get register to be a mentor, go to the Career Services Redhawk Network.

Recent Alumni Spotlight: Tony Capeloto, '11

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on June 4, 2013 at 3:06 PM PDT

 

 Tony Capeloto is a 2011 Albers Graduate, a financial advisor at Wells Fargo Advisors, and on a mission to get the Seattle University Young Alumni Chapter off the ground. “I hope to establish real benefits and services for alumni, and increase the effectiveness of the alumni association, to create something with a wide reach and a real impact.”
 
When looking for colleges, Tony Capeloto knew that he wanted to attend a school in the Seattle area where he could grow professionally and develop a network of contacts that would lead to a job in the fast-paced city he loved. It was Seattle University’s location that put it on his radar.

A Seattle native, Tony attended Blanchet high School where a teacher first introduced him to Fr. Romero, S.J. and the Jesuit philosophy. It was that Jesuit identity that made Seattle U appeal to Tony above the other area schools.

“The most important thing I learned at SU was to give as much as you can. This is why I’ve become so interested in the Young Alumni Chapter. I’m local. I have established connections in the area. I can’t imagine what it’s like to be someone from out of the area who only has 4-years to develop those relationships and then walk across the stage at graduation hoping to find a job. We spend all this time and energy on people who are so valuable to our community, and then we lose them to their home state because they can’t find a job.”

Tony got his first job out of college through the Career Services Redhawk Network.  He began working for a small firm where he was licensed to sell securities. He soon decided he wanted to provide his clients with more resources, and reached out to family friend who became his business partner, mentor and brought him to Wells Fargo Advisors.  “It’s these types of relationships that SU alumni need. Everyone I’ve met from SU has been willing to give their time and advice. We have this great energy, but we have no way to channel it.”
 
Tony is leading efforts to build Seattle University’s Young Alumni Chapter so more recent alumni feel connected to the Seattle University Alumni Association. He envisions a group that is fun, effective and beneficial, and centered on bringing alumni together to create a strong community. “The benefits are exponential when you work together, and that’s a lesson that can be applied to all aspects of life.”
 
If you are interested in taking a more active role in the Seattle University Alumni Association or the Young Alumni Chapter, email alumni@seattleu.edu.

A Graduating Senior's Reflection: Rebecca Leonard

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on June 4, 2013 at 3:06 PM PDT


Rebecca Leonard, '13
College of Arts and Sciences


My life at Seattle University began in the spring, when I accepted my admittance. At that moment, I began to envision my life in Seattle and what being a student at Seattle University would be like. Fast forward four years, and my time at Seattle University is coming to a close in the summer. The time I spent at Seattle University went by faster than I ever imagined it could have, and as I begin to prepare myself for the next stage in my life, I keep wondering what will happen between me and the University that has informed and helped change so much of who I am today.
 
    To compare who I was before coming to Seattle University and who I am now wouldn’t be fair. Before coming to Seattle, I didn’t have many opportunities in high school to be engaged or to be a leader. Coming to Seattle University my first year, I was somewhat overwhelmed walking into the Street Fair fall quarter and seeing how many clubs existed. Excited, I signed up for as many as I possibly could (a freshman mistake, I now realize). Over the years, my commitment to some of these groups declined as others flourished, presenting me with my first opportunity to really discern what was important to me and why.
 
    Now I am confronted with a new type of excitement and fear as I look into my future away from academia. In the end, I am ready to walk across the stage and accept my diploma, as well as my different role in the world. A part of what helps me to be so excited and ready for this transition is that I know I can always come back to Seattle University and still have a place within the community. While I may not be as involved post-graduation as I was during my undergrad years, I intend to be as involved as I can be with the University that has given me so many opportunities.
 
    If I had to synthesize in one word what Seattle University embodies, it wouldn’t be easy, but I’d have to say: care. All around the campus, the care that faculty, staff, professors, students, and alumni have is evident. It’s not just care for those around them, but also the care they have for their job and the tasks in front of them. This care transforms into dedication and persistence, contributing to the aware and active campus that Seattle University can boast. I know that this care will enable me to go out into the world and do what I am passionate about most, while remembering where I have come from.

    As anxious as I am to be gone from Seattle University, I am fortunate to have avoided moments of panic when looking for jobs or dread when thinking about walking across that stage. Seattle University upholds its mission of educating the whole person, evident in the way that SU grads have the foundation of knowledge for their area of study, as well as the assurance and ability to present that knowledge to the world. I am graduating with this confidence, a fact that not many new college graduates can claim. As sad as I am to be leaving my home for the past four years, I look forward to staying connected and to visiting Seattle University in the years to come, not to see friends, but to be with family.

It's On: The Role of Athletics at Seattle U

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on May 2, 2013 at 3:05 PM PDT


“People had fears of Division 1 that never came to reality. Our athletes are still great students and we continue to develop great university programs. - Erin Engelhardt, academic advisor to student athletes

“We make decisions as a university that can change who we are and what we stand for. We need to make sure the changes we make are still true to who we are as an institution.” – Chris Paul, communications professor

 
On the evening of May 1st, spectators packed Connolly’s North Court.  Alumni, staff and students, perched on the edge of their seats preparing to see the battle take place on the court.  This wasn’t the type of action the hardwood was used to seeing.  No hoops, guards, or overtime. Just words - a debate entitled “The Role of Athletics at Seattle U.”

Women’s basketball coach, Joan Bonvincini, Erin Englehardt, and debate student, Al Sadi represented the pro athletics argument.

Their challengers were Chris Paul and Mara Adleman, both professors in the communications department, and Robby Noble, a graduating senior on the debate team.

As the debate got under way, three primary arguments emerged. The first was whether Division 1 athletics aligns with Seattle U’s mission . According to Coach Joan, Seattle University’s mission to create leaders for a just and humane world mirrors her own values.

 “I’m an educator, not just a coach. My lessons are those in life: how to set goals, work as a team, and invest in the community. You’ll find my team doing more community outreach than most of the other students at the university.”

Coach Joan and Erin Englehardt both agreed that athletics helped those attend college who may not have had the opportunity to do so otherwise, and that is indeed in line with our mission. “Look at our Recent Outstanding Alumnus Award winner, Santa Maria Rivera.” said Englehardt. “Without soccer, he would never have ended up at SU or be where he is today.”

That argument didn’t fly with professor Adelman, who shot back saying, “We talk of our university as a premier Jesuit institution, but nowhere in the mission statement does it say that we have to be D-1. When people think of Gonzaga, they don’t think academics or Jesuit values. They think sports. Do we want the same reputation for our own school?”

Professor Paul added his concerns over the NCAA’s treatment of student athletes,  Paul argued that universities who focus on athletics view it as a revenue source, yet the players don’t see that money, pointing out that the term “student athlete” is there to prevent those injured on the job from collecting workman’s comp. He asked the crowd if such an organization supported the just and humane values our institution was founded on.

The second key argument questioned whether athletics affected a student’s success. “They’re under immense pressure to succeed, but to participate in their sport they are required to miss classes. It started off as 2 classes a quarter, and then jumped to 5 and now it’s at 6. We are setting them up to fail. To me that seems unjust and inhumane.” Adelman said.

Englehardt countered with the facts that SU’s student athletes are on average 10 grade points ahead of other students and 70% of our student athletes have a 3.5 GPA .  “We have a senior going on to Harvard for grad school. She missed more classes in the fall for her graduate admissions interviews than because of her sport and I don’t hear anyone complaining about those absences.”
 
The final argument and the one that perhaps drew the most reaction from the crowd, was that of the cost of D-1 sports. The opposition claimed that you can’t be half D-1 and you can’t do it on the cheap. It takes a lot of investment. “Gonzaga built a $30 million arena on its campus. Is that an investment we are prepared to make, or should we make?” questioned Paul.  Are there students who could benefit from that money being spent elsewhere?

According to Paul, “on average schools in the WAC spend $12,000 per student and $56,000 per student athlete. “I’ve had athletes in my class. They have been great. However, I also have a lot of students who aren’t in a sport, and every student deserves the same resources and support.”
 
Robby Noble went on to add “Perhaps there are other students, who are not doing as well that could benefit from the same resources, but are not offered them because they aren’t athletes. I’m graduating this year, with the highest GPA in my college, but I was unable to get into a grad school. Perhaps if I had the same support systems, I too could be celebrating my admission to a PhD program.”

In defense of Seattle U’s athletics, Englehardt said that D-1 benefits students and alumni because of name recognition that it brings, “when applying for jobs, you want people to recognize the name of your university. On the east coast, Gonzaga currently has more pull than Seattle U because of its sports teams.”

After all arguments had been made, the two sides retreated to their respective tables and the audience was asked to vote on the winner. A loud roar rang out in support of our communications faculty, followed by an even louder wave of cheers, posters, and stomping from those in favor of athletics. In the end, both sides agree that everyone wants what is best for our students, our alumni, and our University. We may have different viewpoints, but it’s that diversity of opinion and commitment to every form of excellence that makes this university truly great.