SU Voice Alumni Blog

Seattle U Holiday Recipes

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, ’11, ‘18 on December 6, 2018 at 4:12 PM PST

A big thank you to everyone who submitted their favorite holiday treats. We asked the Seattle U community to share their favorite holiday recipes with us and they delivered. Click here for all you need to have a delicious holiday season! 

2018 December Holiday Recipes

 

A collection of pictures of pies, cakes, cookies, breads and other holidays treats.

Fr. Steve's Christmas Message 2018

Posted by Seattle University Alumni Association on December 5, 2018 at 4:12 PM PST

Fr. Steve Hands Crossed

Season’s greetings, alumni!


This time of the year always reminds me to reflect on what I am most grateful for and how blessed I am to serve the Seattle University community. I am reminded of the important role Seattle U plays in the lives of each of our students, alumni, staff, faculty and all the lives they touch. The gifts of the season are often referred to as joy, gratitude and hope, which are also gifts those committed to Seattle University enjoy throughout the year.


It brings me great joy when I see the active role Seattle University takes in our local and global community. Our students mentor and support central district schools as part of the Seattle University Youth Initiative and join our staff and faculty in Professionals Without Borders, traveling to Belize, Nicaragua and Zambia to help with health and infrastructure projects. Our alumni serve in leadership roles shaping local, national and global policies, leading industries and making a positive impact.


Much of what we are able to accomplish as a community and a university is due to our Jesuit roots and values. Over 125 years ago we got our start as Seattle College, led by Jesuits dedicated to educating the whole person and creating leaders for a just and humane world. I am grateful for the Jesuits who came before us to educate our students and the ones who will come after us to continue our mission and inspire a new generation of students to go forth and set the world on fire.


I am grateful for the students and alumni who use that Ignatian-inspired flame to shape their careers, inform their educations and give back to underserved populations.
I am grateful for the staff and faculty who support our students and embrace our Jesuit values to help ensure we educate the whole person and give each student a personalized learning experience.


I have hope that Seattle University will continue to inspire students and alumni for generations to come.


And finally, I hope that you and your family have a Christmas season that is filled with a peace and comfort that allows you to reflect on all the ways you are blessed and for what you are most grateful.


From our community to yours, Merry Christmas.
Stephen V. Sundborg, S.J.
President, Seattle University

Alumni Spotlight: Nina Cataldo, '15

Posted by Seattle Universit Alumni Association on December 4, 2018 at 4:12 PM PST

Nina and three friends stand in front of a Christmas tree in Santa outfits.

 

I’m Nina Cataldo, Seattle University College of Arts & Sciences ‘15. While I grew up mainly in Portland, Oregon, I used to spend my summer and winter holidays traveling back to Tokyo, Japan to be with my mom’s side of the family. In college, I did a semester exchange at Sophia University in Tokyo. This experience landed me a job as an advisor and writer for a Japanese publisher, and so, I returned to Tokyo upon graduation. Although I grew up very close to my Japanese roots and traditions, it has definitely taken some adjustment to move back to Japan and navigate it as a working adult. One interesting aspect has been watching the whole holiday season unfold in the city.


It’s fascinating how Japan can be such a tradition-driven country, and yet, be so keen on adopting festivities from the West. In recent years, for example, Halloween has become the biggest celebration (probably even bigger than in the U.S.) around Tokyo. While the majority of this country doesn’t identify with Catholicism or much of any religion at all (because Buddhism and Shintoism are considered part of the lifestyle instead of religions), Christmas has also become a modern long-standing celebration in Japan. However, the culture and traditions around it are much different than in the U.S.!


Christmas in the States is about decorating the Christmas tree, attending mass, spending time with family, and sharing a meal with loved ones at home. I often associate American Christmas with a time of reflection, love, and peace. In Japan, Christmas has turned into a special date-night, mostly associated with a romantic time for couples to celebrate together, exchange gifts, and to enjoy the Christmas light illuminations all around the cities. These illuminations are incredible and each year their setup and shows seem to get more extravagant. The whole city is lively leading up to the Christmas day and all night long.


Another odd and commercialized tradition in Japan for Christmas is eating KFC (Kentucky Fried Chicken). Japanese families and groups often need to put in Christmas day KFC orders weeks in advance or line up for long hours! My friends, whom are mostly expats, and I usually organize a get-together at one of our homes before many head home or away. We combine holiday traditions from our homes, like mulled wine and mince pies from Europe and a white elephant gift exchange. It’s nice to have friends who are like family when our own aren’t nearby, and the holidays are a great way to learn about various cultures while living in such a diverse city. All of this aside, Christmas isn’t recognized as a national holiday, so we work through the week or generally until the 28th of December.


Japan’s biggest and most important holiday is New Years; New Year’s holiday resembles more of the family time that Christmas or Thanksgiving has in the States. As a result, we usually have the whole first week of January off for the holiday. On New Year’s Eve, the whole extended family gathers at the (grand)parents’ home and shares a noodle cuisine called toshikoshi soba which translates to “overcoming the year soba (noodles)” with the noodles representing a long and prosperous year ahead. While some stay out for various countdown events, shows, and parties, many choose to stay at home and maybe pay a visit to the local temple or shrine for a prayer after midnight called hatsumode (first prayer). All the New Year’s Eve festivities or downtime is followed by a massive feast on New Year’s Day. The traditional osechi ryori “New Year’s cuisine” is prepared alongside other dishes that varies from household to household, and region to region. In my family, 16 of us gather at my grandma’s home and we order sushi, make katsu (pork and chicken cutlets), have a crab feast, and add a few other dishes like sashimi and kamaboko (fish cake). The feast is followed by lots of relaxation and food-induced naps, as well as massive sales, and more likely than not for me, a trip up to the snowy mountains for snowboarding.


The holidays are a hard time for many to be away from family, especially for people like me who are expats. But the holidays have been a great time for those of us who have become friends to share a piece of our home and traditions with each other. There’s nothing as touching and exciting as seeing new friends try a Thanksgiving feast for the first time, or seeing my Jewish friends eager for my reactions at my first Hanukkah festivities. This time of year is a reminder that we can create holiday cheer and adopt local traditions or make new holidays traditions no matter where we are in the world.

Justin Santiago, ’17: Creating Community for our Veterans

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, MBA '18 on November 1, 2018 at 1:11 PM PDT

Justin's headshot, wearing suit and tie

Justin Santiago, ’17, was a Master at Arms (military police officer) Petty Officer 3rd class (MA3) in the U.S. Navy before finding his way to Seattle University. “I was transitioning to life outside of the military and working as a driving school instructor. When I came across a student who was attending Seattle University, it all fell into place.” Justin shared, “The student said it was by far one of the best programs and schools he had enrolled in, so I decided to check it out.”


Justin considered the University of Washington, but it wasn’t the right fit. After Justin toured campus and spoke to professors and students, something clicked and he knew this was where he wanted to be. “I really liked the values of the university and how they focused on developing the whole person,” Justin shared, adding that he really identified with the school’s slogan at the time, “Inspired from above, ignited from within.”


During his time at Seattle University, Justin was a member of the Association of Latino Professionals For America and became involved in Seattle University’s Veterans Group. SU’s Veterans Group is based out of Seattle University’s Outreach Center, which serves as a resource and space on campus for members of the veteran community.


“I assisted with the first wreath dedication ceremony. This was incredible,” Justin said, explaining that the Outreach Center was looking for ways to commemorate Memorial Day. “I was inspired by wreath dedication ceremonies I’d seen in the Navy and I thought it would be something meaningful the university could do to honor the fallen.”


Today, Justin works at DocuSign as a member of the Financial Services team and is the president of the newly developed Veterans Alumni Group.
According to Justin, the main objective of the Veterans Alumni Group is to provide outreach and resources to alumni and students who are veterans, active duty and their dependents. Justin said, “We want to reach out to members of the SU veterans community and provide a professional network as well as support for those looking to transition to civilian life.”


The Veterans Alumni Group is looking to grow its base and engage more community members. As president, Justin encourages those interested in helping to solidify the mission of the group and learning more to reach out to PJ Graziani, Assistant Director in the Seattle U Alumni Association, at graziani@seattleu.edu.
Celebrate Our Veterans During Homecoming


Seattle University is honoring our veterans during Homecoming November 8-11. From fundraising opportunities and service projects to cheering on the Redhawks, there are lots of ways to celebrate our veterans during Homecoming. Check out just a few highlights below.


Saturday, November 10

Homecoming Day of Service
9 a.m.-12 p.m.
Seattle U/International District

One way that you can join our veteran community is to participate in Homecoming Day of Service with the Mission Continues. The Mission Continues empowers veterans who are adjusting to life at home to find purpose through community impact. Participants will conduct a neighborhood litter pickup and planting operation in support of the Danny Woo Garden. Register here.


Robert Bennedsen Veteran's Day 5K
9-11:30 a.m.
Seattle University

The run is free with a suggested donation of $15. Attendees who donate $15 or more will receive a limited edition SU challenge coin, while supplies last. Proceeds benefit the Veterans Emergency Fund. Bring your kids and dogs and run or walk the course. Register here.


Sunday, November 11

Men's Basketball Mega Rally and Game
6-7 p.m. Rally | 7 p.m. Game
ShoWare Center

We are showing our gratitude to ALL military & veterans by giving them 4 FREE tickets to our men's basketball game and rally. Sign up for your complimentary tickets and make sure to bring your Military ID in order to retrieve your tickets.


A complete list of Homecoming activities is available here.

Investing in First Generation and Veteran Students

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, MBA '18 on November 1, 2018 at 1:11 PM PDT

In keeping with the Jesuit ethic of cura personalis, Seattle University is committed to developing each student as a whole person—mind, body and spirit. Within Seattle University’s Student Development department, this integrated approach to Jesuit education is seen as a call to action, informing how Student Development staff engages students and collaborates with campus partners.


A sense of belonging, involvement and connection is crucial to student academic success, mental well-being, graduation and, ultimately, success professionally and personally. For many alumni, their experience outside of the classroom was just as formative and impactful as their time spent in class, which is why Seattle University recently invested $6.5 million in the Student Development Initiative.

Students standing next to Outreach Center sign


Part of that investment was in Seattle University’s Outreach Center, which opened its doors in the fall of 2017. The Outreach Center was the brain child of Dr. Alvin Sturdivant, vice president of Student Development. He identified that first generation students weren’t getting direct resources and not enough was being done to support veterans on campus.


The Outreach Center provides events and programming for first generation and veteran student populations, as well as resources on how to be successful at Seattle University, such as how to register for classes, manage homesickness and gain access to veteran benefits.


We sat down with Gretchenrae Campera, ’08, assistant director of success and outreach for Seattle University to learn more about the Outreach Center.
“When I was here, there was nothing like this,” Gretchen Rae said. “I was a first gen student from a military family, so this work is deeply personal. If the Outreach Center had been there for me I would have been more successful. It provides students a place to land with people who understand their experience.”


According to Gretchen Rae, the Outreach Center aligns with Seattle University’s effort to ensure all students are successful. These student populations are important to the Seattle U community, diversifying our student population and providing unique perspectives. The hope is that the services the Outreach Center provides will help make Seattle University more accessible to non-traditional students.


Gretchenrae says they’ve received a lot of questions from the Seattle U community as to why veterans and first generation students are grouped together at the Outreach Center. “The grouping actually makes a lot of sense,” Gretchenrae said, explaining that over 60% of student veterans in the United States are also first generation students. “Both populations experience similar issues, learning to navigate new kinds or relationships and what it means to be a college student.”


The Outreach Center has developed programming such as “First Gen Friday” where first generation students and alumni come together to share their experiences. Other programs connect veterans to their benefits. According to Gretchenrae, community partnerships are important to the outreach center. The center hopes to partner with Seattle University’s alumni. “Both our first gen students and veterans would like the opportunity to get to know alumni and learn about their experience navigating life after college, finding jobs and even applying to grad schools.”


If you would like to get involved with the Outreach Center, you can email them at outreachcenter@seattleu.edu. To learn more about the Outreach Center and their upcoming events, connect with them on Facebook.

Courage in the Workplace

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, MBA '11 on November 1, 2018 at 1:11 PM PDT

SU Advantage is our popular alumni networking series which brings together professionals and experts to explore relevant topics, followed by structured networking. This fall’s topic is “Encouraging Courage in the Workplace.”


What does it mean to be courageous in the workplace? Does it mean you have to make grand gestures and call others out or is it the little things we do each day to support each other counts as courage?

Wendy Gage Headshot
(Wendy Gage)


According to event moderator, Wendy Gage, it’s both. Wendy is a certified executive coach, strategic planner and team builder. Her PLANMAN practice spans the USA. She has also served as a coach in Seattle University's nationally ranked Center for Leadership Formation (LEMBA) since 2008. When we asked Wendy what her definition of courage is, she quoted Winston Churchill saying, “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” She expanded upon that to say, “If we look at the capacity of every kind heart, fierce mind and brave spirit, just imagine how that kind of energy from a number of people would look and feel. It’s encouraging.”


But why should we care about being courageous in the workplace and why is it important? According to Wendy, this topic calls on us as individuals to do our part. The climate of the world and the workplace is not always sunny and bright; it can be uncomfortable and necessary for us to do our part. That’s where courage emerges.


The event on November 15, brings together distinguished Seattle U alumnae to share their experiences and deconstruct the idea of courage in the workplace.
The panelists include Ann Yoo, '98, Vice President and Senior Relationship Manager at Bank of the West, Stephanie Peirolo, '13, Founder of UpperHand, LLC and Kirsten Curry, '01 JD, AIF, CEO of Leading Retirement Solutions.


When asked why she wanted to be a part of this event, Wendy shared that she was excited about who we are bringing together and the focus topic, saying that, “Seattle U is the perfect place for this kind of conversation to be nurtured.” She went on to say, “This event is for everyone who is interested in getting very real about what encouraging courage looks like and feels like in the workplace and uncovering and exploring what they and their friends can do to help grow such a culture.”

Attendees will not only have the opportunity to hear our panelists discuss this engaging topic, but to share their own insights in small networking groups following the discussion. This presents an exciting chance for alumni to gain valuable insights while growing their professional network.


You can learn more about this event and reserve your spot below. Don’t wait–space is limited.


SU Advantage Networking Night
“Encouraging Courage in the Workplace”
Thursday, November 15, 2018
6:30 -8:30 p.m.
Seattle University, LeRoux Room, Student Center 160
Register now. 

Redhawks Gear Up for an Exciting Season

Posted by Seattle University Alumni Association on November 1, 2018 at 12:11 PM PDT

Basketball player shooting the ball

 

After finishing last season with its first 20-win Division 1 season since 1964, the men’s basketball team is looking forward to an even better season this year. The Redhawks finished 2017-18 20-14 overall, 16-3 on their home court and 8-6 in Western Athletic Conference play. The season culminated in the program's third national postseason tournament appearance in the past four seasons—a berth in the Collegiate Basketball Invitational (CBI).


Head Coach Jim Hayford’s up-tempo style of play saw the 2017-18 Redhawks set numerous modern-day DI program records including total points (2,589), field goals (881), field goal percentage (44.6), three-point field goals (312), free-throw percentage (73.8), rebounds (1,298) and blocks (123).


The Redhawks bring the momentum of the record-breaking season to this year’s team, returning four letter winners in Morgan Means, Matej Kavas, Mattia Da Campo and Aaron Nettles. In addition, a trio of transfers who spent the 2017-18 season redshirting at Seattle U will immediately infuse the Seattle U line-up. Myles Carter, a 6-9 forward from Seton Hall, Delante Jones, a 6-5 guard from American, and Dashawn McDowell, a 6-5 guard from Southern Methodist University, will bring experience and new energy to the team. The Redhawks have also added nine new players, including seven freshmen and two transfers.


Kavas has been named a preseason All-WAC First Team selection by both the league’s nine head coaches and the WAC media. The 6-8 guard was the Redhawks’ leading scorer in 2017-18, averaging 15.2 points per game. He led the WAC with 91 three-pointers and finished the year ranked eighth in the nation, hitting 46.4 percent from beyond the arc.


Basketball fans anxious to see some action need not wait much longer. The men’s basketball team kicks off its season on November 6 at Stanford. The Bay Area alumni chapter and SU Athletics are hosting a rally before the game to get fans pumped up! Two-days later, The Redhawks play their first home game against the University of Puget Sound on November 8 at the Redhawk Center.


Show Your Redhawk Pride at Homecoming!
If that wasn’t enough excitement for you, the Redhawks play their Homecoming game against Bryant at the accesso ShoWare Center on November 11. We want to pack those stand with alumni fans and to make it easier, we are giving you a ride in the first ever alumni party bus! As the name implies, we are bringing the Homecoming party from Seattle to Kent. Not only do you not need to worry about the hassle of parking, but your ticket on the alumni party bus includes a Homecoming game ticket, complimentary beer and wine, snacks provided by Whole Foods Market, and a round-trip ride from Seattle U to the accesso ShoWare Center. You can reserve your seat here.

Get Your Tickets!
You can secure your Homecoming game tickets here if you aren’t taking the bus Don’t forget to arrive early for the Homecoming Mega Rally at 6 p.m. at the accesso ShoWare Center.


We are showing our gratitude to ALL military and veterans by giving them four FREE tickets to our men's basketball game and rally. Sign up for your complimentary tickets and make sure to bring your Military ID in order to retrieve your tickets.


This season is shaping up to be one Redhawk fans won’t want to miss. Make your plans now and secure your season ticket package here or individual game tickets here.


Go Redhawks!

A Life of Service

Posted by Tracy DeCroce on November 1, 2018 at 12:11 PM PDT

A Life of Service By Tracy DeCroce 

Tricia and Steve sitting in garden on campus

This year’s recipients of the St. Ignatius Medal are a couple whose conversion to Catholicism in the 1980s helped transform an innate call to service into an unwavering commitment to the poor. Steve and Tricia Trainer, ’02 MDiv, received the university’s highest honor at last week’s Gala, which recognizes individuals whose voluntarism, leadership, humility and service inspire and profoundly influence the progress of the university.


To the Trainers, “it’s all about the people.” Through their decades of service and philanthropy, they have formed close relationships that extend from indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest to people around the globe, along with many Jesuits and individuals within the university.


Catholicism, they say, helped reframe their lives of privilege even as they wrestled with the Church’s position on women and lay leaders. The example of their Native friends holding many faiths helped them find peace in the parts of Catholicism that strengthen their lives.


“Since converting to Catholicism our lives are so much richer,” Tricia says. “It gave us the words for caring for the poor and the things we were feeling. It never seemed like the things we did before we became Catholic challenged our wealth so much. … Through the poor you see God.”


The Trainers began volunteering together as Stanford undergraduates during a 1968 trip to Hong Kong to teach English. Tricia also inherited a family tradition of service that she brought to the marriage. Steve built a successful career as vice president and principal at Wright Runstad & Company and then as co-founder of Seneca Group.
A relationship with the Chief Seattle Club began one day in 1992 when its then director Sister Julie Codd, CSJ, asked Tricia to bring soup to the social service center for urban Native American people. The building was dilapidated and cold, with holes in the wood floor. The Trainers raised money for a new building and, 26 years later, remain actively involved with the organization.


“You’d think we wouldn’t belong because we’re white, but they recognize we’re coming with good intentions,” Steve says. “Native people want to make sure you’re in for the long haul.”


The Trainers have a wide footprint at Seattle University. Steve is a Trustee who chairs the SU Facilities Committee. He also chairs the Campaign Task Force for Global Engagement, which is raising $14.5 million to expand opportunities in Central America, Africa, South Asia, the Middle East and China.


Global initiatives are important work for the Trainers. Steve met Joe Orlando, director of the Center for Jesuit Education, for coffee to talk about what Joe said was the need for greater global engagement at Seattle U. They discussed the importance of elevating global issues and experiencing places in the world where Americans don’t normally go. This conversation progressed to a written proposal to President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., for a Global Engagement Initiative that would develop opportunities for students, faculty and staff to participate in research, study and service experiences in Nicaragua. The proposal led to the Trainers funding the initiative in 2014.
Seattle U and its university and NGO partners on the ground in Guatemala are working to improve the lives of women and children.


INITIATIVE TO SERVE
In collaboration with a team consisting of a faculty member and students from the psychology program at the URL, they met with NGO partners to continue research efforts around the central question: “How do girls and women who experience domestic violence heal?” Lee and her team examined how information about best practices in helping women and girls heal is shared among organizations and governmental agencies who provide resources, including legal aid, to assist survivors of domestic violence. Bringing this information back to the U.S. to train counselors who work with women and girls from Central America is a primary goal. “This work [in Guatemala] has expanded my view so I can help students expand theirs and so counselors can provide better services to Central American women in the United States,” Lee says. For Lott, the value of this research is not only meaningful on a deeply personal level but also impactful on his professional life.


“This is an opportunity to return to the country I fell in love with while I was a student at SU and reconnect with my friends in Guatemala,” he says. “Professionally, it will help me to be better at my job working with immigrant youth here in the United States.”


TRANSFORMING EXPERIENCE
In the afternoon, we do the site visits. I take them to the Cathedral, school for Indian children, to the indigenous village where they meet a spiritual leader… I take them to women’s co-ops, communities living off the train tracks. People are moved by the generosity and the capacity of these communities to give when they have so little.


Q: What personal meaning does the trip have for you?


A: I’m the daughter of Ecuadorian parents but I grew up in New York. And I went from New York to overseas as a young missioner. I’ve always lived in a very diverse, multicultural setting. When I moved to Seattle in 1990 it was my first time being in the dominant culture. Culturally, it was very difficult for me. I also am a devotee of Guadalupe. So for me it is a pilgrimage. It fulfills a spiritual need. Every time I walk into the Basilica, I feel like I’m coming home to the Mother.


Q: How does this pilgrimage align with the mission of Seattle U?


A: This immersion really lifts up our Jesuit values. This is like an incarnation kind of a lived experience of all the things we talk about on campus in terms of the dignity of the human person, the need for community, human rights and spirituality.


A LIFE OF SERVICE
The Nicaragua Initiative expanded to become the Central America Initiative. Under the leadership of Assistant Professor Serena Cosgrove, PhD, who credits the Trainers with helping Seattle U establish a “thriving set of relationships” in the region, there are outreach programs and research across Nicaragua, including the Caribbean Coast, and El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and beyond. Seattle U has also launched global initiatives in India and Africa.


It fits Steve’s vision that “every student should have firsthand experience outside the U.S. as part of their college experience.” Tricia, who received a master’s in divinity from the School of Theology and Ministry, worked as a spiritual director for 25 years for the Spiritual Exercises in Everyday Life program in Seattle. She also worked in family ministry at St. Joseph Church, the couple’s parish.


At Seattle U, Tricia co-founded the Indigenous Peoples Institute (IPI), which supports and celebrates Native students on campus. She and Steve both serve on IPI’s working group. With new projects in the works, the Trainers balance volunteer duties against daily shifts with four grandchildren, ages 18 months to 7 years old, who live close by. Pat Twohy, S.J., who has worked closely with the Trainers on several projects over the years, says the couple’s commitment is the reason many organizations exist. “With an eye for the environment and all peoples, Steve and Tricia have chosen to live simply, sharing all that they can with so many of us,” Twohy says. “Their generosity makes good things happen. Their combined wisdom and compassion truly lights up our world.”


A can see the Gala video honoring Steve and Tricia here.

New Opportunities for Career Development

Posted by Seattle University Alumni Association on October 4, 2018 at 4:10 PM PDT

Alumni say that career development is the most important benefit Seattle U can provide to them. The Seattle University Alumni Association and Office of Career Engagement have increased their investments in career development programs for alumni. We are excited to share new opportunities for alumni to grow their network, develop their careers and achieve their professional goals.


Seattle University Alumni Association offerings include:


Career Conversations
The Seattle University Alumni Association is excited to introduce Career Conversations.
Career Conversations is a monthly opportunity for professional development and transition networking facilitated by career coach Paula Fitzgerald Boos. These monthly meetups are facilitated for all levels of professionals to come together to learn and practice new skills for building careers that align with values and purpose, strengths and interests, and practical marketplace realities. (Note that times switch between morning and evening each month.)
Upcoming Career Conversations this quarter include:

Your Personal Brand
Wednesday, October 17, 2018
7:30-9 a.m.
Admissions and Alumni Building, Conference Room 107, Seattle University
Register now.


The Latest and Greatest - All About Resumes
November 14, 2018
5-6:30 p.m.
Register now.

Networking During The Holidays
December 19, 2018
7:30-9 a.m.
Register now.

SU Advantage Networking Nights
SU Advantage is a networking event that brings alumni together around a relevant topic. Each event features a panel or keynote speaker and then opportunities for structured networking.


SU Advantage Networking Night
"Courage in the Workplace”
Co-hosted by the Women of SU
November 15, 2018
6:30-8:30 p.m.
Seattle University, Student Center
RSVP


SU Advantage Networking Night
Topic: TBD
Co-hosted by the African American Alumni Chapter
April 3, 2018
6:30-8:30 p.m.
Seattle University

 

Three people networking


Build Your Digital Network
The Alumni Association knows the importance of building your network, which is why we offer access to the exclusive SU Alumni LinkedIn group with over 8,000 connections and SU Alumni Connect, the only place to connect with all 80,000 alumni, post and search for jobs, and find alumni by industry and region.

Center for Career Engagement alumni offerings include:

• 1:1 free career advising appointments (up to one year after graduation)
Call, email or complete a career advising appointment request. Learn more here.
• Business & Engineering Career Fair, October 16th, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. - Campion Ballroom
• Post-Graduation Service Fair, Thursday, November 1, 11:00 am - 2:00 pm – Student Center
• Career & Internship Fair, February 12th, 11:00a - 2:00p - Campion Ballroom
• Industry & Inclusion Day, April 16th, all day – Across campus


Visit the Career Engagement website to learn more.

Connecting Alumni Regionally

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, '18 on October 4, 2018 at 3:10 PM PDT

Alumni networking in a professional setting.

 

“We are trying to increase alumni engagement,” said Jonathan Brown, assistant vice president of the Seattle University Alumni Association (SUAA) when asked about the growth of regional events and activities. “All alumni, even if they’ve left the Seattle area, are still key members of our community and we are looking for alumni leaders in six key regions to help us grow our reach and improve our impact.”


In an effort to build relationships with alumni outside of Seattle, Jonathan and his alumni staff have increased the number of regional events they attend. Just last week they hosted a reception in Portland for parents and alumni.


Accord to PJ Graziani, the assistant director of regional engagement, over 35 alumni and friends came out to Portland’s popular Pearl District on October 1 for a reception. They heard updates about the university and built community, sharing stories and memories from their time at Seattle U.
In November, Jonathan is heading to the Twin Cities to co-host the university’s first alumni reception in Minnesota. The event is being hosted by a Seattle University alumna in the area looking to build community and engage the areas 200+ alumni.


On November 6, alumni in the Bay Area are kicking off Seattle U’s Homecoming festivities by cheering on the Redhawk men’s basketball team at a rally and their season opener against Stanford.


“Hosting regional alumni events, supporting our student athletes when they are in your neck of the woods or joining a chapter board are all ways alumni can help us grow our reach regionally,” Jonathan said.


What started off as just two regional alumni chapters two years ago, has grown into ten. According to Jonathan a strategic priority of the SUAA is to grow regional engagement in six key regions including Washington, D.C., the Bay Area, Hawaii, Las Vegas, Portland and Southern California.


Are you interested in helping us to building community in these six key regions? Reach out to PJ Graziani (graziani@seattleu.edu) to learn about leadership roles and volunteers opportunities.


Don’t forget to activate your SU Alumni Connect account. You’ll be able to update your information to ensure you get all the details on events happening near you, and find chapters and alumni groups you’d like to follow.