SU Voice Alumni Blog

Christian Prayer and the Intellectual Life.

Posted by Seattle University Alumni Association on October 4, 2018 at 3:10 PM PDT

woman alum praying in chapel

 

The Institute for Catholic Thought and Culture (ICTC) continues its efforts to advance the Catholic intellectual and cultural tradition through a rich set of offerings. A centerpiece is the Catholic Heritage Lecture series, which will feature “spiritual practice” in challenging situations. “People are looking for depth of meaning in the swirl of activities and barrage of data and conflicts that hit them every day,” Father Pat Howell, S.J., the interim director of ICTC, observed.


This year’s theme will explore the importance of spiritual practice in the advancement of the intellectual life, the building of resilience in the work of activism and advocacy, and the cultivation of joy when working on the margins. By inviting the speakers to campus and reading and discussing their work, the ICTC hopes to advance participant theoretical and spiritual skills in the work for racial and social justice.


The lectures will kick off on October 25 with a public lecture and discussion featuring Dr. Andrew Prevot, associate professor of systematic theology at Boston College. Dr. Prevot will speak on the topic of “Christian Prayer and the Intellectual Life.” Modern philosophers have assumed that prayer is an irrational, irresponsible and immature activity. The history of Christian thought tells a different story, and today, prayer remains the source of much creative and critical thinking. Prevot argues that prayer contributes something vital to the intellectual and moral life. You can get details on Dr. Prevot’s lecture here.


The other topics this year include:

Winter: Spiritual Practice and Activism and Advocacy
Margie Pfeil, Notre Dame
Thursday, March 7 at 7pm in Le Roux Room (STCN 160)


Spring: Spiritual Practices and Working on the Margins
Greg Boyle, Homeboy Industries
Thursday, May 9 at 7pm in Pigott Auditorium


To learn more about the Institute of Catholic Thought and Culture and the Catholic Heritage Lecture Series, click here.

Homecoming is bigger and better in November

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, '18 on October 4, 2018 at 2:10 PM PDT

 

We received alumni feedback about Homecoming and we listened—Homecoming has moved to November 8-11, Veteran's Day Weekend, and with this move, Homecoming gets bigger and extends throughout the Puget Sound and beyond.


This year we are celebrating our veterans, hosting events on campus, in the South Sound, the Bay Area and the Twin cities and engaging more alumni than ever before. With activities like the Red Umbrella Parade, the Robert Bennedsen Veteran's Day 5K, Homecoming Day of Service, the men's basketball mega rally and game and more, there’s something for everyone. Visit the Homecoming website for all the details.


Homecoming VIP Prize Package
One lucky alum will receive the Homecoming VIP Prize Package complete with lodging, free Homecoming game tickets, two seats on the alumni party bus, a bottle of wine, SU swag and so much more! Enter to win by:
• Following the SU Alumni Association on Instagram 
• Activate your account or engage on SU Alumni Connect 
Get one entry for each activity.


Homecoming Activities
Grab your friends and family and show your pride at these great Homecoming events and activities. Make sure you read all the way to the bottom for details on the alumni party bus!

We are kicking off Homecoming in the Bay Area! 

Seattle U Men's Bay Area Rally and Game
November 6, 2018
5 p.m.
Stanford California
Learn more.


Thursday, November 8, 2018


Red Umbrella Parade to Redfest
12:30 p.m.
Seattle University Quad


Redfest Celebration
1-4 p.m.
Seattle University, Student Center

These family friendly activities invite you to join students to wear red, sing the fight song and show your Seattle U pride will enjoy free food and games on campus.


Graduates of the Last Decade (GOLD) Happy Hour
5:30-7:30 p.m.
The Chieftain
The GOLD Council invites all graduates of the last ten years to join them for a Homecoming happy hour. Enjoy food, drinks and community at Seattle U’s “unofficial pub” before the men’s home opener.


Men's Basketball v. University of Puget Sound
Home season opener
7 p.m. |
Redhawk Center


Cheer on the Redhawks at their season home opener against UPS. Space is limited!


Friday, November 9, 2018

Women's Basketball v. Northern Arizona University
6 p.m. | Redhawk Center
Cheer on your 2018 WAC women champions as they take on Northern Arizona State.


Industry Insights: Alumni Sharing Knowledge
12-5 p.m. | Location: TBD
Alumni will join current students to share career insights and professional advice. Contact Stephanie Jamieson (jamiesos@seattleu.edu) for more details. 

Saturday, November 10, 2018


Homecoming Day of Service
8:30 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Time and location varies by site
Join us as we live the mission to serve others and give back to the community by participating during Homecoming Weekend. Learn about each site and register here.


Robert Bennedsen Veteran's Day 5K
9 - 11:30 a.m.
Seattle University
All proceeds benefit the Veterans Emergency Fund. Bring your kids and dogs and run or walk the course.
The run is free with a suggested donation of $15. Sign up here.


Homecoming Day of Service Lunch
12 - 1:30 p.m.
Student Center, LeRoux Room
Join 5k and Homecoming Day of Service participants to build community over a complimentary lunch.

During the Homecoming Day of Service lunch, there will be a silent auction on campus supporting the Seattle University Veteran’s Emergency Support Fund. 100% of the proceeds will go directly into the fund. Follow The Outreach Center on Facebook for updates about the silent auction.


Sunday, November 11, 2018

Alumni Mass
11 a.m. | Chapel of St. Ignatius
Join alumni, students and SU community members for a Homecoming mass.


Men's Basketball Mega Rally
6-7 p.m. | ShoWare Center


Homecoming Men's Basketball Game v. Bryant
7-9 p.m. | ShoWare Center

Homecoming is not just for football schools anymore. Head to the ShoWare Center in Kent to cheer on the Redhawks in the Homecoming game! Tickets go on sale October 8. Get your tickets here. 
Veterans will receive complimentary tickets. Please remember to bring a valid military ID.


Alumni Party Bus!
5 p.m. | Departing from Seattle University
With the Homecoming game in Kent, we are sending an alumni party bus to and from the ShoWare Center. Tickets include a discounted game ticket, charter bus transportation, complimentary beer and wine on the bus and snacks compliments of Whole Foods. The first 25 to register also get a free Homecoming t-shirt. Space is limited - reserve your spot now! 

Seattle University Twin Cities Homecoming Alumni Luncheon
Saturday, Nov 17, 2018, 11:30 AM
Lakeville, MN
Learn more.

Alumni Award Nominations: Now Open

Posted by Seattle University Alumni Association on September 5, 2018 at 4:09 PM PDT

Every year the Alumni Board of Governors recognizes outstanding members of the Seattle University community at the Alumni Awards. Nominations for the 2019 Alumni Awards are now open. Know a community member who demonstrates service to others, exceptional leadership and a commitment to our Jesuit values? Nominate them today!


As a member of the alumni community, you are in the perfect position to recommend our community's best candidates. There are five eligible categories:

Alumna/us of the Year
The highest honor bestowed by the Seattle University Alumni Association. Recognizes alumni who have demonstrated outstanding leadership, service to the university and community, and a commitment to care, academic excellence, diversity, faith and justice.
Nominate an alum here.

Outstanding Recent Alumna/us
Recognizes alumni who have graduated within the past 10 years whose actions reflect the values and mission of SU. Recipients of this award have demonstrated outstanding leadership and a commitment to care, academic excellence, diversity, faith and justice.
Nominate an alum here.

University Service Award
Recognizes alumni who have demonstrated extraordinary time and service to Seattle University. Whether the recipient served boards, university colleges and schools or students, the recipient has a long-standing legacy of service with the university.
Nominate an alum here.

Professional Achievement Award
Recognizes alumni whose careers exemplify a Seattle University education – demonstrating leadership and intellectual and professional achievement. Recipients of this award have often gained national or international recognition in their careers.
Nominate an alum here.

Community Service Award
Recognizes alumni who have made a lasting impact in their communities. Through service in spiritual, artistic, recreational, educational, social justice or other upstanding areas, recipients better the quality of life around them.
Nominate an alum here.


Don't forget to save the date for the 34th Annual Alumni Awards.
When: April 26, 2019
Where: Four Seasons Hotel Seattle

 

SU Welcomes a New Provost

Posted by Seattle University Alumni Association on September 5, 2018 at 3:09 PM PDT

Shane Martin Profile Picture

On June 18, Shane Martin, PhD, joined Seattle University as the new provost. Martin came to Seattle University from a sister Jesuit School, Loyola Marymount University, where he served as dean of both the School of Education and Graduate Studies.


Martin is a tested and proven academic leader. As dean he brought visionary thinking and a spirit of innovation to his work in building, strengthening and supporting academic programs. Under his leadership, LMU’s School of Education has come into its own as a nationally ranked and highly regarded school and, since 2012, he has led Graduate Studies in strategically setting priorities and growing its program offerings.


With the student experience always at the heart of his work, Martin is committed to enhancing learning opportunities, advancing diversity and inclusion and ensuring that faculty are supported in their work and continued development. He has deep experience in ensuring faculty voices are heard, fostering interdisciplinary collaboration, harnessing the power of technology in ways that align with the university’s mission and managing complex budgets.


At LMU, Martin’s leadership has frequently been sought on a number of critical initiatives. His service has included chairing the committee that guided the university’s accreditation process as well as a committee on technology. A leader in the wider education community, he has served as chair and member of many boards, including his current service as a state commissioner to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.


Martin’s commitment to Jesuit higher education is integral to who he is as an educator, administrator and person. A product of Jesuit education, Martin has led a number of national Catholic and Jesuit organizations, including service as past president of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities Education Deans Conference, past chair of the Association of Graduate Schools in Catholic Colleges and Universities and past chair of the American Educational Research Association Special Interest Group on Catholic Education. As he shared during his interview process, Martin understands keenly both the challenges now confronting all institutions of higher education and how Jesuit colleges and universities, in particular, are uniquely positioned to navigate and thrive in this climate.


At his core an educator and prolific scholar, Martin has authored three books and has contributed to many peer-reviewed publications on the topics of cultural diversity in Catholic schools, technology and learning, social justice in education and multicultural education. Additionally, he has received numerous awards and distinctions for his excellence as a leader and educator, including as a 2015 fellow of the Pahara-Aspen Education Fellowship.


Martin replaces Bob Dullea who provided outstanding direction for the university as interim provost for two years. Dullea was critical in ensuring we kept moving forward together in meeting our challenges and embracing opportunities.


Before his arrive, Martin shared these thoughts. “I am honored and humbled to become the next provost at Seattle University, an institution that has a strong reputation as a premier university in the Northwest and is poised to rise to greater heights. I look forward to working in partnership with the Seattle University students, faculty, staff and alumni who are making a difference throughout the greater Seattle region, the United States and the world.”

Celebrating Our Veterans During Homecoming

Posted by Seattle University Alumni Association on September 5, 2018 at 3:09 PM PDT

 

This fall as other schools are gearing up for Homecoming football and chilly tale gates, Seattle U is joining in the fun as Homecoming Weekend moves to November with basketball!


With Veterans Day taking place over Homecoming Weekend, celebrating our veterans is a key element of this year’s Homecoming. 
We sat down with Tom Hove, Seattle University Veterans Navigator, to talk about how our veterans’ community is being celebrated as part of Homecoming.


The Homecoming festivities kick off on Thursday with the Red Umbrella Parade, sports games and other festivities, with Homecoming Day of Service and the Robert Bennedsen Veteran’s Day 5k on Saturday, concluding on Sunday with the Homecoming men’s basketball game.


The Robert Bennedsen Veteran’s Day 5k honors the service of a fallen alumni hero and celebrates the contributions of our military and veteran community. This family friendly event will have participants running around the perimeter of campus. All alumni and families are invited to participate. Anyone who makes a donation of $10 or more to the Emergency Support Fund, which supports our student veterans, will receive a limited edition challenge coin. Check the Homecoming website for details on registering for the 5k.


The Day of Service opportunities include manning the 5k and joining the veteran’s organization, The Mission Continues, to clean up the international district. You can sign up for Day of Service here.


Following the 5k and Day of Service, there will be a lunch and silent auction on campus with all proceeds going toward the Veterans Emergency Support fund. Veteran resource tables will also be on site throughout the day.


According to Tom, “This Veteran’s Day we are not just saying thank you for your service we are actually showing our gratitude, and that’s the type of support we give to our veterans. We are a military supportive school.”


On Sunday the Homecoming festivities continue with a Homecoming pre-game rally and men’s basketball game v. Bryant at the ShoWare Center. All veterans will receive special ticket pricing. Details are not yet finalized so check the Homecoming website for information as it becomes available.


Learn more about Homecoming here and join us to celebrate our veterans and show your Seattle U pride.

Exploring the Common Text: Tulalip from My Heart

Posted by Seattle University Alumni Association on September 5, 2018 at 2:09 PM PDT

Book Cover

 

Students preparing for their freshman year at Seattle University are tasked with reading a common text, which will be discussed with faculty and staff during Welcome Week and incorporated in programs throughout the year. The Common Text not only provides students the opportunity to practice active reading and exploring challenging and conflicting ideas, but introduces students to the Ignatian-inspired process of inquiry. This process emphasizes meaning-making, risk-taking and asking deep questions.


The Common Texts for the next two years were chosen by a committee of fifteen faculty, staff, and students selected from a list of finalists. The 2018-19 Common Text is Tulalip from My Heart: An Autobiographical Account of a Reservation Community.


Presented in the author’s own voice, this memoir is immediately engaging as an act of storytelling. It is accessible and varied and offers distinct, specific history of the lives of native peoples here in the greater Seattle area.


As publisher University of Washington Press explains, “Written by a member of the Tulalip tribe and edited posthumously by the local community college writing instructor who collaborated on the project, Tulalip, from My Heart is . . . written in rich, voice-driven text and the traditional Tulalip storyteller narrative style, recounts the myriad problems that such tribes faced after resettlement. Born in 1904, Dover grew up hearing the elders of her tribe tell of the hardships involved in moving from their villages to the reservation on Tulalip Bay: inadequate supplies of food and water, harsh economic conditions, and religious persecution outlawing potlatch houses and other ceremonial practices.”


Members of our committee were excited about this text as a local oral history, as it is likely to engage a broad array of members of our community, as well as a range of ethical complexities related to ethnography, local history, issues of translation, etc. This book is an immersive experience in storytelling, and it is a beautiful example of qualitative research, an important example to incoming SU students. Moreover, it is well-timed to coincide with the opening of Vi Hilbert Hall in 2018, named for a Washington State National Treasure, Vi Hilbert, who devoted much of her life to preserving Native American Lushootseed (Puget Sound Salish) language, traditions and stories.

 

MiKe Mullen: Celebrating 30 Years at Seattle University

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, MBA, '18 on September 5, 2018 at 1:09 PM PDT

Mike Mullen, alum, showing the Redhawk sign with hands.

Mike Mullen, ’89, is the definition of a dedicated alumnus. Not only has he worked on campus for the last 20 years, but he is a frequent attendee to events, including cheering on our student athletes at their home games, and he recently joined his classmates Tina O’Brien and David Read to plan a 30th reunion celebration taking place next weekend on and around campus.

Mike is a member of a legacy family, his two older brothers attended Seattle University before him. Friends enrolled in Seattle University’s Honors Program encouraged him to apply, he did and spent the next two years in the Honors Program under the leadership of Fr. Dave Leigh. Mike went on to get degrees in literature and history.

As soon as he joined the Seattle U community, Mike was an active member. He was an OA advisor, participated in the first dance marathon on campus, was a work study student in facilities and nearly became class president, losing out by a few votes.

Mike attributes Seattle University with shaping him and teaching compassion for himself and others. “Seattle University taught me about all things Jesuit and what that meant when applied to my thinking and spirituality. I was profoundly influenced by Sister Helen Bendik O.P. from campus ministry. She became a dear friend, like a second mother. She and others helped soften my world view. I went from a world that seemed black and white and harsh and learned it was differing shades of gray and benevolent”.

Ten years after graduating from undergrad, Mike returned to attend grad school and work at Seattle University. Mike got a job in the facilities department reporting to his same boss from his undergraduate work study job. He now runs the Mechanical/Plumbing shop on campus. The opportunity to work on campus was a dream come true for Mike. It allowed him the opportunity to see old professors and build camaraderie with people who love the university as much as he does and who have dedicated their life to it.

When asked why he has chosen to stay so involved, Mike said it was his passion around the Mission of the university. He and Cal Ihler, from the facilities department, started Professionals without Borders to provide opportunities for staff to better live the Seattle University mission through international service trips to Zambia, Nicaragua and Belize. Mike has travelled with PWOB at least 15 times, traveling across South America and Africa to help with mechanical projects for orphanages and hospitals.

It’s Mike’s passion for Seattle University and the great relationships he built here that inspired him to join classmates Tina O’Brien and David Read to plan a 30th Reunion for the classes of 1988 and 1989 this Friday, September 14th through Sunday, September 16th. Reunion attendees will have a full weekend to reconnect with friends and rediscover Seattle University. Jesuits and professors the class will recognize have also been invited.

On why his classmates should attend their reunion, Mike smiled and said, “People should come because they will be so surprised and happy to see the real formative changes here at SU and I (and Dave and Tina) will be so happy to show them. It’s the same campus – just better. I miss these folks. I would love to introduce them to our alumni bar, the Chieftain, which we never had while we were students and show them how vibrant the campus (and community) is. It’s exciting to see SU assume its role asSeattle’s University.”

To learn more about the 30th reunion celebration and secure tickets visit the alumni website.

Your Alumni Benefits

Posted by Seattle University Alumni Association on June 5, 2018 at 10:06 AM PDT

Your degree is not the only benefit to being an alum of Seattle University. The Seattle University Alumni Association provides support and growth opportunities at every stage of your life and a broad array of benefits is one way we do that.

 

 

Three people networking


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT


Career Services Advising appointments


You have unlimited access to advising appointments up to one year after graduation. Learn more.


Career Workshops
Tools for Transition: Alumni Career Workshops are offered throughout the year to help you look for a job or change your career.


SU Alumni Connect
You can now post or search for jobs on our new online alumni directory, SU Alumni Connect. Find alumni in your profession or regional area.


LinkedIn
Build your network by connecting with 8,300 alumni professionals on our LinkedIn alumni group.

Smiling woman at Reunion

SOCIAL

Alumni Chapters and Affinity Groups
Chapters and affinity groups are a great way for you to meet other alumni and stay connected. Designed to bring together alumni based on geographic regions, shared experiences, interests and identities, you'll enjoy social, professional, service and other opportunities of interest as part of a group. You can learn more about our chapters here.


SU Alumni Connect
SU Alumni Connect is the new alumni directory and the only place where you can connect with all 80,000 alumni, join alumni chapters and groups, post jobs and more. Activate your account!


DISCOUNTS


Insurance
Whether you are looking to purchase your own insurance for the first time or you are just looking for the best deal, we have options for you.


Auto, Home and Rental
Seattle University alumni could receive a special discount on GEICO auto insurance. Visit geico.com/alum/seattleuniversity or call 1-800-368-2734 to find out how much you could save today! (Be sure to mention your affiliation with Seattle University to be eligible for the special savings.)

Medical, Life, Disability Insurance and More
Our partner, Alumni Insurance Program, provides comprehensive insurance offerings at money-saving group rates for: medical, group term life insurance, disability, long term care and travel insurance.

 

Students participating in a fitness class.


Fitness Center Membership
Base Rate: $399 annually / $35 monthly

As  an alumni of Seattle University, you have the opportunity to use the facilities at the Eisiminger Fitness Center and take fitness classes with an alumni gym membership.

Learn more.


ZipCar
Zipcar, the world's largest car sharing network, has partnered with Seattle University to offer you an exclusive discount. Join today and pay only $15 (Compared to $70)

Legal Services
As  an alumni of Seattle University, you are entitled to a no cost, one hour attorney consultation for advice on family law issues with Goldberg Jones.


PRIDE

Seattle U License Plates
Show your pride and support student scholarships with a Seattle U license plate. Get yours now!

CONTINUING EDUCATION


Become a life-long learner with our alumni audit program. As  an alumni, you are able to audit undergraduate courses for a nominal fee ($35 or $55 per course).


Want more details about any of the benefits you’ve read about here? Visit our website.

Welcome Class of 2018

Posted by Damian Peterson ‘09 on June 5, 2018 at 10:06 AM PDT

 

To the graduating class of 2018,


As president of the GOLD (Graduates of the Last Decade) Alumni Council, let me be the first to congratulate you. You are nearly there! In just a little over a week, you’ll have had your last coffee in Pigott, sauntered across the Quad and stepped into a much bigger world. However, as you may have already noticed, this is just the beginning. You will have new opportunities, failures, shifting opinions about the world around you, and relationships that will shape who you are and what you are to become. I remember graduating as a young, ambitious theater major thinking, “Well, I guess I just do this now? But what is this?” It is both a daunting and thrilling feeling, and I can’t help but be excited for you all. It is up to you to divine the journey. If there is one thing that eight years of Jesuit education has imprinted in me, it’s that the best tools that we have are the community we create and the discernment we practice.


A friend once told me, “We have choices to make and that will be the greatest challenge and most significant gift set before us.” What choices will you make? How will you make a difference? I graduated less than 10 years ago and still, I can’t imagine what it is like to be thrust into such a competitive, and culturally divisive environment for the first time, or for some, again. At SU, we are prepared to receive this as a call to action, to live our best life and make the change we seek in the world. But for now, let’s forget about the metaphors, the sage advice, the open questions. You’ve heard this all before. It is going to be a fun run—that I can promise you. And you won’t be running alone. Your fellow graduates and alumni share this common thread, and are here to help you along the way.


Volunteering with the Seattle U Alumni Association and serving as president of the young alumni community, I have had the pleasure to work with a range of diverse and compelling people. Most of these alumni I never knew during my time at SU. Yet, I have gained peers, friends and even a job because of this network. I have come to see that we are all cut from the same cloth, sharing a willingness to empathize, to learn, to question, and to grow. That age old Jesuit phrase of cultivating the “whole person” truly is the greatest gift we receive with this education. I invite you to build upon the community you’ve created here at Seattle U by joining the young alumni community, also known as Graduates of the Last Decade (GOLD), at social events, career programming and service and other opportunities. You will meet new people, learn and broaden your perspectives. From there, trust your instincts and the choices you make. That will take you where you didn’t know you needed to be.
The best of luck, class of 2018, and welcome to the Seattle University Alumni Association!


Regards,
Damian Peterson ‘09
President, GOLD Alumni Council

Damian Peterson headshot


While the young alumni community is a fun and active group, it’s not the only alumni community you can join. We have a vibrant chapter and affinity group program that connects alumni regionally, and through shared interests, experiences and identities. African American Alumni, Women of SU, International Alumni, Bay Area Alumni Chapter and the Hawaii Alumni Chapter are just a few of the groups you can connect with. Activate your account on SU Alumni Connect to learn more.

Projects Day

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, '18 on May 2, 2018 at 1:05 PM PDT

Student Leaders of Tomorrow Solving Problems Today

Seattle University’s location in the heart of a booming city provides the unique opportunity to partner with leading businesses on real-world projects for engineering and computer science students. As they learn from these companies and their employees, our students prepare for successful careers after graduation.

One example of such a partnership is through the Seattle University College of Science and Engineering Project Center. Small teams of engineering and computer science students are partnered with industry sponsors and mentored by Seattle University faculty to provide solutions to real-world problems. Over the course of the academic year, student teams are responsible for almost everything expected from a professional consultant, including project management, budgeting and scheduling. The students collectively work 1000 hours to design and deliver their prototype, software application or proof of concept. Projects Day, coming up next month, is the culminating event of this year-long experience for the students. At this event, student teams present their work to the public, their sponsors and fellow classmates.

We spoke with Chris Payne, a 2000 mechanical engineering graduate and director of Boeing’s Airplane Systems Team, to learn what it means to sponsor a project and why he’s stayed involved with Seattle University. Projects Day is nothing new for Chris, who has been a member of the Mechanical Engineering Advisory Board since 2008. He has attended and participated in Projects Day for many years.

 

Chris Payne in a Boeing Airplane Cockpit

(Chris Payne and his team aboard a Boeing aircraft.)

“Before I was on the board I would come out to Project Day to see the projects. It’s a fun opportunity to meet the students, ask them questions about their work and hand out business cards.”

As a project sponsor, Chris assigns a manager from his team to act as a liaison between Boeing and the Seattle University students on the project. Chris works with that manager to ensure the team gets the support they need and to ensure that he stays informed on the direction the project is headed.

The project Chris is sponsoring this year is focused on improving the windshield wiper motor for commercial airplanes. A great opportunity for students, if they develop a viable option is will be put into production.  “It’s a great opportunity to get the students involved. They’ve come out here to tour the airplane and learn about the issues we are up against.” Chris went on to explain that while a windshield wiper motor may not seem exciting, they are unreliable and when not working properly, damage a plane’s windshield, resulting in costly repairs and delays.

“I value working with the Project Center and the students because of the opportunity to shape the learning of the students who are about to enter the workforce, and help them connect the dots between their education and a real-world problem,” Chris says.

Chris encourages fellow alumni to attend Projects Day saying, “You have to come meet the students and see their capabilities and skills and the passion that the students have developed. You’ll also see what these students are going to bring to industry. They aren’t just solving a paper exercise. They have tackled real-world problems and have been thoughtful about how to bring them to market.”

Interested to see how Chris’s team tackled the problem of the windshield wiper motor? Come see for yourself during Projects Day on June 8th.

 Register here