SU Voice Alumni Blog

Search for Meaning Book Festival

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on February 2, 2015 at 11:02 PM PST

You are invited to the seventh annual Search for Meaning Book Festival.

Launched in 2009, the festival has evolved into a signature SU event. Featuring a veritable who’s who of the literary and scholarly worlds, this year’s festival includes more than 55 best-selling authors of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and more. The annual one-day festival offers general sessions, keynote presentations, book signings and interactive experiences. Individuals from all walks of life spend a day with some of the world’s most influential authors and scholars while reflecting on their own ability to contribute to a more just and humane world.

Since it began six years ago, the Search for Meaning Book Festival has been a great success thanks to the support of our neighbors, community members and generous donors and volunteers who have given their time and financial resources to make this a one-of-a-kind event. Yet with increasing costs associated with the festival, a $10 fee must be charged for entrance this year for each attendee ($5 for students). Visit Search for Meaning to purchase your tickets and learn more.

A special thanks to this year’s title sponsors, Robert and Laura Ellen Muglia, whose tremendous generosity allows the university to continue offering the event with only a modest admittance fee. The university also continues to devote significant financial and personnel resources to the festival to further minimize the cost for attendees.

Volunteer for the Search for Meaning Book Festival! This is a great opportunity to engage with students, alumni, community partners and distinguished authors from the surrounding areas. By volunteering, you will receive a voucher for lunch and fun swag and you will also be able to attend one of the keynote speakers for free! 

 

Employer Information Sessions

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on January 8, 2015 at 2:01 PM PST

Alumni, did you know that Employer Information Sessions are a valuable tool to help you on your job hunt? Join recruiters from companies such as Amazon, Puget Sound Energy, The Peace Corps and more each week on campus during the lunch hour.

This is your opportunity to learn what it’s like to work at some of the top companies in the Puget Sound area and about their values and mission. You’ll gain insights directly from recruiters as to what they look for in candidates and position yourself for interview success. 

Learn about all upcoming information sessions on the Career Services homepage

A Celebration of Our History - A Mixer of the Decades

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on October 2, 2014 at 1:10 PM PDT


The Seattle University Filipino Alumni Chapter (FAC) is celebrating Filipino American History Month on October 10 with “A Celebration of Our History - A Mixer of the Decades.”

The Seattle University Filipino community has played an important role in preserving and sharing the Filipino American history on a national level. Seattle U alumni, Fred, ’52 and Dorothy, ’53 Cardova formed the National Filipino American Historical Society in 1982, which would go on to named October Filipino American History Month in 1991.  

According to the NFAHS website, “Fred and Dorothy Cordova have been involved in Filipino American activism since the 1950s. They began promoting Filipino American identity at a young age with student publications and organizations at Seattle University, where they attended college. In 1957, they formed and directed the Filipino Youth Activities (FYA), with activities ranging from soccer to folk dancing and parade marching. The FYA became an important force for organizing demonstrations in the 1960s and 1970s.”

The Cardovas became pillars of the Filipino community and maintained their relationship with Seattle University, returning to serve on advisory boards, as Regents and as guest lecturers. Seattle University awarded the couple honorary degrees in 1998.

The FAC invites students and alumni to join them on October 10 to explore Filipino American history and honor the contributions from some of our own Seattle University Filipino community members.  

Guests will spend the evening connecting with alumni and students, while exploring Filipino American history through pictures and Seattle University artifacts.

Students from the United Filipino Club will attend and perform for guests, as well as share a presentation on this year’s Barrio festival.

The full FAC chapter leadership will be in attendance to celebrate and hopes you and your family will join them.

Register now for “A Celebration of Our History - A Mixer of the Decades.”

Leading from the Heart: Pope Francis and Ignatian Leadership

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on April 3, 2014 at 12:04 AM PDT

Never before have we seen the kind of world-wide attention and popularity that Pope Francis has drawn in his first year of the papacy. In fact, he ranked #1 on Facebook as most talked about in 2013. From washing the feet of youth in detention during Holy Thursday mass (including two Muslims and two women), to his famous “Who am I to judge?” statement on the inclusion of homosexuals in the Church, Pope Francis is showing the world the values of being a true Ignatian Leader.

As graduates of Jesuit education, we look to Ignatian Leaders such as Pope Francis to set the example for being men and women for others as we lead and live in contemporary life. Simply put, what makes his example of leadership so special is that he leads from the heart. 

So, what exactly do we mean by "Ignatian Leader"?

The Jesuits offer an approach to leadership, often called Ignatian or Ignatian-Inspired Leadership, which flows against the tide of most contemporary and dominant leadership models. Some might say that it is quite counter-cultural here in the United States. This approach to leadership is grounded in what author Christopher Lowney calls the four pillars of self-awareness, ingenuity, love, and heroism, and lifts up leadership in a very different light. It proposes that:

  • •“We’re all leaders and we’re leading all the time, well or poorly.”
  • •“Leadership springs from within. It’s about who [we are] as much as what [we] do.”
  • •“Leadership is not an act. It is [our] life, a way of living.” 
  • •“[We] never complete the task of becoming a leader. It is an on-going process.”

Therefore, an Ignatian-Inspired Leader (regardless of religious affiliation) understands and appreciates the rich gifts of the Jesuits, St. Ignatius and the Spiritual Exercises, and strives to grow in self-knowledge, cultivate a healthy indifference that allows him/her to adapt confidently, honestly loves those he/she serves and leads, and humbly strives and works with others to shape an inspiring future. 

We are excited to see how Pope Francis will lead in the years to come!

Magis, in partnership with Seattle University Alumni Relations, encourages you to learn more about Ignatian Leadership on May 8th as part of the SU Advantage Networking series. Seattle University President Fr. Stephen Sundborg, S.J. will be joined by a diverse panel of alumni from varying professions to share insights about their lived experience of leadership, including an opportunity for structured networking.

Also, if you happen to be a young alum in your twenties or thirties, consider applying for Magis'; Contemplative Leaders in Action, a two year alumni leadership development program which blends spiritual formation and secular leadership training. Applications will be available starting April 15th, so be sure to mark your calendar!

Battle of the Bands - Celebrating 25 Years

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on February 6, 2014 at 2:02 PM PST

 This February 28th - March 2nd Seattle U is reigniting the tradition of Homecoming. When you think of Homecoming, you might think of a dance and the music that goes with it. While we don't suggest getting dressed up in your formal best, we can assure you that we've got your musical needs covered this Homecoming with Battle of the Bands: Game of Tones on Friday, February 28th.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of Battle of the Bands, when up to a dozen student bands will battle it out in a showcase of amazing Seattle U talent competing for various prizes and bragging rights. Professional musicians will evaluate the performers and attendees will vote for their favorite. We want alumni there singing, cheering and dancing along. You could almost think of it as your Homecoming dance. Tickets are limited - get yours today.

In Honor of Veterans' Day

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on November 6, 2013 at 11:11 PM PST

Seattle University has produced many graduates who’ve gone on to serve our country and make us proud. Thank you to all of you for serving your country.

In honor of this Veterans’ Day, we are  featuring one alumnus and veteran who has dedicated his time to helping other veterans navigate the benefits process.

Don D. Whedon, Sr., ’73, is a retired member of the United States military. He has served across different branches including the Navy, Army and Air Force in both Vietnam and Grenada.

After Vietnam, Whedon returned home to attend college and play football. Whedon took classes at different colleges and universities until finally coming to Seattle University where he studied psychology.

“The Jesuits who taught at Seattle University really cared about the students as individuals and cared that they learned the material. At other schools it seemed like the professors didn’t care about the students, but not at Seattle University. Fr. Goldberg, Professor George and Dr. Strickland knew so much.”

In 2005, Whedon retired from the military and completed veterans’ service training. He now works as a veterans’ service officer for the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Whedon acknowledges that his education at Seattle University helped direct his career goals. “The Jesuit values are to give and to serve and that’s what I do. It keeps me alive and it keeps me healthy. I’ve always been one to help someone get the help that they need. I’ve worked a lot with homeless veterans identifying those most in need of help and raising money for Catholic Community Services to find homes for veterans.”

Though not a lawyer, Whedon is well versed in the veterans’ claims process. If there are any alumni who are looking for help navigating litigation or claims with the Veteran’s Administration, Don  Whedon would like to help.

Join the Search for Meaning! March 9th, 2013

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on January 2, 2013 at 4:01 PM PST

 

 The fifth annual Search For Meaning Book Festival, hosted by Seattle University's School of Theology and Ministry is coming in just a few months: March 9th, 2013, all day on the Seattle University Campus.

Mark your calendars! Tickets go on sale on January 14th, through Brown Paper Tickets, and are expected to go fast.
 
The Festival hosts over 40 authors in session, featuring keynote speakers Michael Chabon, Pulitzer Prize winning novelist, as interviewed live by National Book Award winner, Sherman Alexie, as well as internationally acclaimed scholar Reza Azlan.

For information on the Festival, please visit www.searchformeaning.us. You can also check out the Search For Meaning Facebook page to stay up to date with all things related to the festival.

We hope you'll join us at this incredible  Festival, which is also free and open to the public, thanks to our generous title sponsors Laura Ellen and Robert Muglia and partners Elliott Bay Book Company and the Seattle University Book Store.

Alumni

Calling all Seattle University's School of Theology and Ministry Alumni! You are warmly invited to the annual Alumni Breakfast, just before the Festival begins.  Enjoy great food, a special speaker, and quality time with fellow alums on the morning of the Festival, Saturday, March 9th, 2013 at 7:30am. 

Visit other Seattle University alums throughout the day!  The Admissions and Alumni building will be open to alums for socializing during the festival.

Playful and Profound SU’s newest sculpture Justice (Just Ice) is a delight to behold

Posted by Amanda Kelly on April 19, 2012 at 11:04 AM PDT

A dramatic new work of art appeared on Seattle University’s campus during spring break. Situated in the garden between the second floors of the Student Center and the Library and Learning Commons, the sculpture appears to consist of large ice cubes or blocks of glass.

Upon closer inspection, the cubes are made of a durable, specially cast resin. The sculpture is the work of Seattle-area artist Joe McDonnell and it is a commissioned gift from longtime friend of the university Ann Pigott Wyckoff.  The sculpture consists of sixty translucent blocks, each approximately two feet on each side and weighing about five pounds. McDonnell and his assistant painstakingly assembled the sculpture on campus throughout most of a week, carefully positioning the blocks so that they appear to be tumbling over and down a concrete wall.   It was not their first run-through—they had previously put the sculpture together in McDonnell’s studio.

The cubes at their highest point are more than twelve feet off the ground. When one look at the blocks nearest to the top, they seem precariously perched, as if they are about to roll off the pile and onto the ground, but this is just an illusion. The blocks are fastened to the wall in the background and to a special anchoring frame beneath them. As striking as the installation is in the day time, the sculpture elicits perhaps even more delight in the evening when illuminated by a series of LED light bars that can change colors.

“The sculpture is simultaneously playful and profound, and I hope it will positively engage and visually refresh people when they walk between the Student Center and the Lemieux Library/McGoldrick Learning Commons,” said Jerry Cobb, S.J., who coordinated the art collection for the library and learning commons. 

Jim Hembree, Senior Director of Development in University Advancement, was instrumental in bringing McDonnell’s sculpture to SU.  The sculpture, as Hembree sees it, is part of a growing trend at SU. For some time, he points out, most of the university’s artistic treasures have graced the interior spaces of our buildings, but in recent years, “Outdoor sculpture is gaining a more prominent presence on our campus. This is a big growth area for SU’s art collection.”

McDonnell graciously allowed the SU community to have a contest to name the sculpture, and more than 160 entries were submitted.  The winning entry was submitted by Lauren Maza, who recounted how as she looked at the sculpture she thought of some of the core SU mission values, and the word “Justice” came to her and she realized it contained the words “Just Ice.”  Joe McDonnell selected this name so the sculpture’s formal title is “Justice (Just Ice).” 

McDonnell’s work joins a three other recent sculptures added to the campus collection:  Joel Shapiro’s untitled abstract bronze figure of a running person on the library’s lawn, which was made possible by Dick and Betty Hedreen in 2010; Preston Singletary’s Northwest Native-inspired “Transformations” metal sculpture, which was installed on the north side of the Admissions & Alumni Building last summer; and Robert Pospisil’s haunting metal sculpture “The Prisoner” which will be installed soon in the Law Annex. 

While SU’s latest sculpture may be outdoors, it can just as easily be enjoyed by those having a bite to eat in the Student Center or studying in the Library and Learning Commons. McDonnell worked for more than a year conceiving and constructing the sculpture. Students and other campus community members provided feedback and responses to the work as it evolved. 

McDonnell has produced more than 150 major commissions for institutions, corporations and individuals including CBS, IBM, General Electric, Readers Digest, Dulles Airport, the Milwaukee Public Museum and the New Jersey state government. Known primarily for his distinguished work in sculpting metal and bronze, McDonnell in recent years has turned to glass and cast resins as part of what he calls the “ice age” phase of his career.

Jerry Cobb, S.J.

You can learn more about the artist and his works at www.joemcdonnell.com.

Reflections from Beth Kreitl, Executive Director, SU Career Services

Posted by Amanda Kelly on March 5, 2012 at 9:03 AM PST

Purpose. What does it mean to live a life of purpose? Inspired by the gifted presenters at today's TEDx event, hosted by Seattle University, I have been contemplating my current answer to this question. The question itself invites us to go deeper. What gives us a sense of purpose? Which then leads us to go even deeper. What is purpose? I learned today that the Latin derivative "pur" means fire. Powerful. What lights your fire? What makes you burn with passion? I didn't have an immediate response to the question. But then we were invited to go a little further. If you can't identify your fire, then can you identify your sparks? Could we notice and be attentive to those? Could we search for the places in our lives at work, home, outdoors, and in community where we feel energized? What are the activities in which we lose all sense of time? Reflection is a core value of the Ignation educational tradition, and as members of Seattle U's alumni association, we invite you to continue that reflective process. Reflection must be balanced by action, so if you have read this blog, and want to dive more deeply into both reflection and action in seeking to answer this powerful question about what gives your life a sense of purpose, you may want to consider participating in the upcoming 4-week workshop series entitled: "Jumpstart Your Career."

Participants in the winter workshop series found the program to offer a space to reflect, connect and gain valuable tools for every individual's unique place along their career path. When asked to comment on the most recent series, Career Coach Elizabeth Atcheson, who is also scheduled to lead the upcoming series, stated the following:  "In my work as a career coach, I give dozens of workshops every year - to all ages and all stages. My winter series with Seattle University alumni was one of the best group experiences in my memory.  Why?

    • Sharing:  The participants engaged fully, knowing that all exchanges would be held in confidence, and offered lots of ideas and connections to each other.
    • Work:  The participants (all SU alumni) buckled down and did the work they were asked to do.
    • Humor:  We were able to laugh at ourselves and each other.  Looking for a job can be daunting and depressing, so a little bit of humor goes a long way.
    • Learning:  During the course of the 4 evenings, a tremendous amount of material was presented and digested.  Participants grew accordingly so that by the last session, their knowledge of "how to look for a job" was much more nuanced and realistic.
    • Community:   We developed a sense of connection to the greater Seattle University community and established some respectful and substantive ways to build on that deep connection."

 

 

Beth Kreitl, EdS, LMHC, NCC 
Executive Director, Career Services

 

SU alumni called to help local non-profit Water for Humans at fundraiser!

Posted by Amanda Kelly on January 23, 2012 at 9:01 AM PST

 Nearly 1 billion people in the world do not have access to potable water and over 2.5 billion people lack proper water sanitation.  At the Valentin Gomez Farias Elementary School in Oaxaca, Mexico, providing clean water to its students is a daily struggle. The school must use its limited resources, not to purchase books and school supplies, but to purchase bottled water. The municipal water is simply too unsafe to drink. 

Water for Humans, a Seattle-based non-profit, is working to find sustainable solutions to fix this and other water sanitation issues in Oaxaca. Water for Humans does more than supply people with finite amounts of clean water—it establishes long-term solutions that empower communities to obtain clean water for years to come.  As students or alumni of Seattle University, we are called to create a more just and humane world. While we cannot always devote our daily lives to social justice, we can certainly support those who do. 

The Seattle University SIFE team invites you to support Water for Humans’ work by attending a fundraiser on Thursday, February 9 at 6 p.m. in Student Center 160 at Seattle University. This fundraiser will feature a silent auction, a raffle, and a performance by the Seattle Fandango Project. Tickets are $25 for adults and $10 for current students. Please contact Jordyn Gustafson (gustafs7@seattleu.edu) for more information.

 Help further Seattle University’s commitment to social justice by joining us for an evening of giving!  

Margaux Helm, '14
Albers School of Business and Economics