SU Voice Alumni Blog

Seattle University Launches New School with Programs Aimed at Working Adults

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on August 3, 2015 at 12:08 PM PDT

Seattle University is accepting applications for two new bachelor’s degree programs for working adults that will be part of a new school. The School of New and Continuing Studies (NCS), the university’s ninth distinct college or school, will offer classes in the degree programs Digital Cultures and Organizational Leadership beginning next spring.

The new school was established to provide a high-quality Jesuit education designed for working adults by offering baccalaureate and certificate programs that support part-time study and feature hybrid courses, combining online and in-class instruction. An existing certificate program, Web Development, which is designed along these lines, will also be part of the new school. Plans call for NCS to offer additional degree programs in the future.  

The NCS degree programs are designed to meet the needs of working adults who have some college credit, mid-career professionals and veterans looking to enhance their careers by increasing their skill sets, and working adults who want to complete their college degree and may also be considering a new career.

“Seattle University is adding something new to the mix for adult learners who are traditionally underrepresented in higher education,” says Rick Fehrenbacher, dean of the new school. “Those who want the benefit of an outstanding Seattle University education, but for whom a traditional college experience is not accessible, can now turn to the School of New and Continuing Studies. The hybrid delivery of our courses will make an SU education available to students with even the busiest schedules.”

Prospective students applying for admission to Digital Cultures or Organizational Leadership must have the equivalent of 60 hours of college credit and a minimum 2.0 GPA.

Once underway in spring quarter, with classes beginning March 29, 2016, NCS programs will have a rolling admissions schedule, which allows students to begin their degrees year round. Students also can apply to NCS’s Web Development certificate program, which is beginning a new cohort this fall.

For more information about the new school and programs, visit http://www.seattleu.edu/ncs/.

A look at the degree programs

Digital Cultures: This program, designed for part-time students, offers an interdisciplinary liberal arts degree for the 21st century developed for returning students who are interested in using critical exploration and technological knowledge to understand how digital technologies reflect and transform culture and identity. Topics of study include game theory, global digital ethics and citizenship, the influence of social media and the history of digital technologies. Students will also learn applied technology skills such as basic coding and composing for the web. The Digital Cultures program strengthens transferable skills such as oral and written communication, problem solving, ethical decision-making and critical thinking, while also teaching students key practical technology skills such as basic coding and composing for the web. Graduates are prepared to transition into several different jobs such as social media specialist, technical writer, writing for the web, digital content production and digital editor.

Information:  www.seattleu.edu/ncs/degree-completion/digital-cultures/

Organizational Leadership: This interdisciplinary degree program is designed for part-time students who want to gain the leadership skills necessary to become effective, ethical and socially responsible leaders in a wide range of organizations from business, government and health care administration to nonprofit agencies and the service industry. Students will study topics including leadership theory and practice, organizational structure and behavior, organizational finance, ethics, managing diversity and change and organizational communication. The course of study integrates skills in leadership and organizational operations and links leadership theory to everyday practice. Students develop not only the practical skills and knowledge that leaders need to solve problems, think critically, communicate effectively and manage resources, but also learn to provide creative vision, facilitate collaboration, value diversity and balance multiple perspectives. 

 

Recent Alumni Spotlight: Derek Rogalsky, '10

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on April 1, 2015 at 3:04 PM PDT

When you think of an outstanding recent alum, someone like Derek Rogalsky, ’10, comes to mind. Derek is a dedicated alumnus of Seattle University, devoted husband and new father, with a commitment to service and professional excellence, making him the perfect choice for the 2015 Outstanding Recent Alumnus Award.

Derek was recruited to Seattle University by Redhawk soccer coach, Peter Fewing in 2006. Derek would play for the team throughout his four years at Seattle University, helping the soccer team achieve a 43-3-26 record while it transitioned from Division II to Division I. Derek was not only a star on the field but in the classroom, he maintained a 3.9 GPA throughout his four years on the soccer team.

After his graduation, Derek remained committed to Seattle University’s values of service, volunteering with his wife Rebekah Rogalsky, ’09, in Haiti. There the couple spent a year teaching, mentoring and coaching at the Louverture Cleary School (LCS), a co-educational Catholic boarding school for academically gifted students from impoverished backgrounds. 

“Spending time with such people allowed me to recognize the true abundance of the blessings in my own life…I had been called to serve because I have been blessed,” Derek said of his time in Haiti.

As a volunteer at LCS, Derek taught biology and religion, led the garden club, coached soccer and helped coordinate The Haitian Project’s Institution response to the cholera epidemic, keeping the campus free of infection. 

Derek went on to Georgetown University School of Medicine, where he is currently in his fourth year studying to be a surgeon. 

“I’ve chosen surgery because it is a profession uniquely equipped to help people in their most desperate hour of need.” Derek said. 

This past year, Derek was one of 21 fourth year medical students nationwide to receive the American Medical Association Physicians of Tomorrow Award. 

Stephen Ray Mitchell, M.D., MBA, dean of the Georgetown University School of Medicine, considers Derek to be “A leader among peers and faculty in his outreach into the inner city, his discussion and inquiry into kidney transplantation, medical education, medical student debt and major life choice.  He will remain a leader long after graduation.”

We are proud to honor Derek with our Outstanding Recent Alumnus award at our upcoming 30th Annual Alumni Awards.  We hope you’ll join us to celebrate him and five other outstanding alumni at the awards ceremony. 

30th Annual Alumni Awards
Saturday, April 18, 2015 | 6:00 p.m.
Fairmont Olympic Hotel

Tickets available now.

 

Search for Meaning Book Festival

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on February 2, 2015 at 11:02 PM PST

You are invited to the seventh annual Search for Meaning Book Festival.

Launched in 2009, the festival has evolved into a signature SU event. Featuring a veritable who’s who of the literary and scholarly worlds, this year’s festival includes more than 55 best-selling authors of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and more. The annual one-day festival offers general sessions, keynote presentations, book signings and interactive experiences. Individuals from all walks of life spend a day with some of the world’s most influential authors and scholars while reflecting on their own ability to contribute to a more just and humane world.

Since it began six years ago, the Search for Meaning Book Festival has been a great success thanks to the support of our neighbors, community members and generous donors and volunteers who have given their time and financial resources to make this a one-of-a-kind event. Yet with increasing costs associated with the festival, a $10 fee must be charged for entrance this year for each attendee ($5 for students). Visit Search for Meaning to purchase your tickets and learn more.

A special thanks to this year’s title sponsors, Robert and Laura Ellen Muglia, whose tremendous generosity allows the university to continue offering the event with only a modest admittance fee. The university also continues to devote significant financial and personnel resources to the festival to further minimize the cost for attendees.

Volunteer for the Search for Meaning Book Festival! This is a great opportunity to engage with students, alumni, community partners and distinguished authors from the surrounding areas. By volunteering, you will receive a voucher for lunch and fun swag and you will also be able to attend one of the keynote speakers for free! 

 

Employer Information Sessions

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on January 8, 2015 at 2:01 PM PST

Alumni, did you know that Employer Information Sessions are a valuable tool to help you on your job hunt? Join recruiters from companies such as Amazon, Puget Sound Energy, The Peace Corps and more each week on campus during the lunch hour.

This is your opportunity to learn what it’s like to work at some of the top companies in the Puget Sound area and about their values and mission. You’ll gain insights directly from recruiters as to what they look for in candidates and position yourself for interview success. 

Learn about all upcoming information sessions on the Career Services homepage

A Celebration of Our History - A Mixer of the Decades

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on October 2, 2014 at 1:10 PM PDT


The Seattle University Filipino Alumni Chapter (FAC) is celebrating Filipino American History Month on October 10 with “A Celebration of Our History - A Mixer of the Decades.”

The Seattle University Filipino community has played an important role in preserving and sharing the Filipino American history on a national level. Seattle U alumni, Fred, ’52 and Dorothy, ’53 Cardova formed the National Filipino American Historical Society in 1982, which would go on to named October Filipino American History Month in 1991.  

According to the NFAHS website, “Fred and Dorothy Cordova have been involved in Filipino American activism since the 1950s. They began promoting Filipino American identity at a young age with student publications and organizations at Seattle University, where they attended college. In 1957, they formed and directed the Filipino Youth Activities (FYA), with activities ranging from soccer to folk dancing and parade marching. The FYA became an important force for organizing demonstrations in the 1960s and 1970s.”

The Cardovas became pillars of the Filipino community and maintained their relationship with Seattle University, returning to serve on advisory boards, as Regents and as guest lecturers. Seattle University awarded the couple honorary degrees in 1998.

The FAC invites students and alumni to join them on October 10 to explore Filipino American history and honor the contributions from some of our own Seattle University Filipino community members.  

Guests will spend the evening connecting with alumni and students, while exploring Filipino American history through pictures and Seattle University artifacts.

Students from the United Filipino Club will attend and perform for guests, as well as share a presentation on this year’s Barrio festival.

The full FAC chapter leadership will be in attendance to celebrate and hopes you and your family will join them.

Register now for “A Celebration of Our History - A Mixer of the Decades.”

Leading from the Heart: Pope Francis and Ignatian Leadership

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on April 3, 2014 at 12:04 AM PDT

Never before have we seen the kind of world-wide attention and popularity that Pope Francis has drawn in his first year of the papacy. In fact, he ranked #1 on Facebook as most talked about in 2013. From washing the feet of youth in detention during Holy Thursday mass (including two Muslims and two women), to his famous “Who am I to judge?” statement on the inclusion of homosexuals in the Church, Pope Francis is showing the world the values of being a true Ignatian Leader.

As graduates of Jesuit education, we look to Ignatian Leaders such as Pope Francis to set the example for being men and women for others as we lead and live in contemporary life. Simply put, what makes his example of leadership so special is that he leads from the heart. 

So, what exactly do we mean by "Ignatian Leader"?

The Jesuits offer an approach to leadership, often called Ignatian or Ignatian-Inspired Leadership, which flows against the tide of most contemporary and dominant leadership models. Some might say that it is quite counter-cultural here in the United States. This approach to leadership is grounded in what author Christopher Lowney calls the four pillars of self-awareness, ingenuity, love, and heroism, and lifts up leadership in a very different light. It proposes that:

  • •“We’re all leaders and we’re leading all the time, well or poorly.”
  • •“Leadership springs from within. It’s about who [we are] as much as what [we] do.”
  • •“Leadership is not an act. It is [our] life, a way of living.” 
  • •“[We] never complete the task of becoming a leader. It is an on-going process.”

Therefore, an Ignatian-Inspired Leader (regardless of religious affiliation) understands and appreciates the rich gifts of the Jesuits, St. Ignatius and the Spiritual Exercises, and strives to grow in self-knowledge, cultivate a healthy indifference that allows him/her to adapt confidently, honestly loves those he/she serves and leads, and humbly strives and works with others to shape an inspiring future. 

We are excited to see how Pope Francis will lead in the years to come!

Magis, in partnership with Seattle University Alumni Relations, encourages you to learn more about Ignatian Leadership on May 8th as part of the SU Advantage Networking series. Seattle University President Fr. Stephen Sundborg, S.J. will be joined by a diverse panel of alumni from varying professions to share insights about their lived experience of leadership, including an opportunity for structured networking.

Also, if you happen to be a young alum in your twenties or thirties, consider applying for Magis'; Contemplative Leaders in Action, a two year alumni leadership development program which blends spiritual formation and secular leadership training. Applications will be available starting April 15th, so be sure to mark your calendar!

Battle of the Bands - Celebrating 25 Years

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on February 6, 2014 at 2:02 PM PST

 This February 28th - March 2nd Seattle U is reigniting the tradition of Homecoming. When you think of Homecoming, you might think of a dance and the music that goes with it. While we don't suggest getting dressed up in your formal best, we can assure you that we've got your musical needs covered this Homecoming with Battle of the Bands: Game of Tones on Friday, February 28th.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of Battle of the Bands, when up to a dozen student bands will battle it out in a showcase of amazing Seattle U talent competing for various prizes and bragging rights. Professional musicians will evaluate the performers and attendees will vote for their favorite. We want alumni there singing, cheering and dancing along. You could almost think of it as your Homecoming dance. Tickets are limited - get yours today.

In Honor of Veterans' Day

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on November 6, 2013 at 11:11 PM PST

Seattle University has produced many graduates who’ve gone on to serve our country and make us proud. Thank you to all of you for serving your country.

In honor of this Veterans’ Day, we are  featuring one alumnus and veteran who has dedicated his time to helping other veterans navigate the benefits process.

Don D. Whedon, Sr., ’73, is a retired member of the United States military. He has served across different branches including the Navy, Army and Air Force in both Vietnam and Grenada.

After Vietnam, Whedon returned home to attend college and play football. Whedon took classes at different colleges and universities until finally coming to Seattle University where he studied psychology.

“The Jesuits who taught at Seattle University really cared about the students as individuals and cared that they learned the material. At other schools it seemed like the professors didn’t care about the students, but not at Seattle University. Fr. Goldberg, Professor George and Dr. Strickland knew so much.”

In 2005, Whedon retired from the military and completed veterans’ service training. He now works as a veterans’ service officer for the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Whedon acknowledges that his education at Seattle University helped direct his career goals. “The Jesuit values are to give and to serve and that’s what I do. It keeps me alive and it keeps me healthy. I’ve always been one to help someone get the help that they need. I’ve worked a lot with homeless veterans identifying those most in need of help and raising money for Catholic Community Services to find homes for veterans.”

Though not a lawyer, Whedon is well versed in the veterans’ claims process. If there are any alumni who are looking for help navigating litigation or claims with the Veteran’s Administration, Don  Whedon would like to help.

Danicole Ramos, '16: Alumni Call to Action

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on October 2, 2013 at 1:10 PM PDT

If there is anything that Seattle University has shown me in my first year it is that it values the spirit of community. My roommate defined it best when he told me, “Danicole all people want in college is to feel important and make others feel important too.”

I remember rehearsing our Men’s Kahiko for Hui 'O Nani Hawaii’s luau. Our instructor, Erin and Taryn made the boys run through the dance. During one of the run throughs, Erin yelled, “Stop! Someone is off and doing the moves all wrong but I don’t want to say who it is. I don’t want to hurt their feelings.” Being that this was the first lu’au I’d ever be part of, I was so excited and enthusiastic. I told Erin, “It’s okay. We’re family. Just say who it is. It’s not a big deal.” Then she looked at me and said, “Okay, Danicole it’s you.”

But that’s why having a community is so important, especially in college, when you’re by yourself and away from home. A community watches out for you, they ground you, and pick you up when you fall.  And that is why you are all here leading successful careers and lives. It’s because during your time at Seattle University, whether it was a club, a professor, or Jesuit, someone saw something special about you before you even realized it.

Take McDonald’s for example. It’s a restaurant that is all over the world. Of course, there is your usual menu of French fries and a big Mac, but each McDonald’s across the world has a unique menu. Where Hawaii has Portuguese sausage, spam, eggs, and rice, a place like Italy serves their sandwiches on cibatta bread, In The Philippines, they serve longanesa for breakfast and in Canada, you can get a McLobster roll. McDonald’s does this in hopes that they can attract consumers to their restaurant by appealing to their culture and the background of their consumers. It is that idea where Seattle U develops their community. At the core, Seattle U wants to develop students who become leaders. But to do that, they make sure that whether the student is interested in sports, social activism, cultural clubs, or student government, that there is a place for them to channel their passions to better the school and later on the world.

During your years at Seattle University, you have been asked to fulfill Seattle University's mission to be "…leaders for a just and humane world." Tonight, you can continue to fulfill that mission by helping 7,000 students like me do the same in their education. Because somewhere back in Seattle, there is a student majoring in SPEX who fins great joy in teaching PE and healthy lifestyles to second graders at Bailey Gatzert Elementary School. In the library there is a student who designs a blueprints for her engineering class, dreaming one day that they will be the one to build a strong bridge through the I5. In a crammed studio in the Murphy Apartments, a senior nursing student studies all night for their medical ethics course because they wish to one day become a nurse practitioner and provide quality healthcare for their impoverished hometown. A Humanities for Teaching major sets up a table by C-Street during lunch to encourage students to sign a petition to demand racial and economic equality to public school students.  And in the Pigott Auditorium, there are a small group of economic students selling baked goods to fund a trip to Panama to teach economic sustainability in rural communities.

These stories are the stories of future leaders in the making. We are the future leaders who take our education beyond the textbook and into society. Because like you, SU has emphasized to us that education is not how much you know, but what you do with how much you know. The new generation of SU students (us) understand that it is our kuleana in making this world more effective, ethical, and efficient. However, we cannot continue this endeavor without your mentorship, your guidance, your support, and most importantly, your story of how Seattle University has changed your life.  

And as your support us, guide us, mentor us, and share your story, we will do as Saint Ignatius called us to do which is "Go forth and set the world on fire." Aloha and thank you for your time.


Alumni Events: February 2013

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on February 7, 2013 at 11:02 AM PST

 

Basketball Games and Rallies
 

Thursday February 14th, 2013 | 7:00 PM | Men vs.  Louisiana Tech 
KeyArena

Saturday February 16th, 2013 | 7:00 PM | Men vs. Texas at Arlington
KeyArena
Join us for the last pregame rally of the season!
5:30 PM|Club Live 

Alumni Board of Governor’s Men’s Basketball Viewing Party
Chieftain Irish Pub & Restaurant |908 12th Ave. Seattle, WA 98122

Saturday February 7th, 2013 | 5:00 PM | vs. U of Denver

Meet the Alumni Board of Governors at the Chieftain for door prizes, $5 appetizers, and Happy Hour specials while you watch the Redhawks take on the University of Denver.

Buried Child
By Sam Shepard | Directed By Professor Rosa Joshi

Lee Center for the Arts

$6 Students | $8 Faculty & Staff | $10 General Admission

Preview February 20th, 2013| 7:30 PM
February 21-23, 2013 | 7:30

February 24 & March 3, 2013 | 2:00 PM

Winner of the 1979 Pulitzer Prize, Buried Child sealed Sam Shepard’s reputation as an iconic post-modern playwright. A sinister secret buried deep in the recesses of the past threatens to resurface and destroy an already deeply damaged family. When Vince brings home his girlfriend to meet his family, things don’t go quite as he envisioned. Why doesn’t anyone know him? This darkly comic masterpiece reminds us that there really is no place like home.

 

Instrumental Concerto Competition
Pigott Auditorium
Friday February 22nd, 2013 | 7:00 PM

$5 Students | $8 Faculty & Staff | $12 General Admission

Watch music students compete for the opportunity to win in a music scholarship and serve as a guest soloist with Orchestra Seattle for the 2013-2014 concert season.  

Save the Date for these Upcoming Events:
 

11th Annual Alumni Crab Feed
Hosted by the Albers School of Business
Campion Residence Hall |Saturday March 2nd, 2013 | 5:30-11:00 PM

Enjoy a fun evening organized by the Albers Alumni Board in order to bring members of the community together and support student scholarships at Albers. There will be a lively silent auction and reception before dinner, and after our feast of crab and chicken, jazz and cocktails will follow in the jazz lounge. Table sponsorships are available for groups of all sizes. Contact Rob Bourke at bourker@seattleu.edu to register or call (206) 296-2277 for more information
 

SEARCH for Meaning Bookfest
March 9th, 2013| Seattle University Campus
Annual festival and nationwide network surrounding the human search for meaning.
Tickets, Purchase tickets through Brown Paper Tickets. The School of Theology and Ministry presents a day of over 300+ authors,
including Pulitzer Prize winner Michael Chabon, internationally acclaimed scholar Reza Azlan and Sherman Alexie.

 

Western Athletic Conference Tournament & Alumni Happy Hour
Tournament |Tuesday March 12- Saturday March 16, 2013

Alumni Happy Hour |Tuesday March 12, 2013 | 4:00-6:00 PM

Come and cheer on Seattle University in the Western Athletic Conference Tournament in Las Vegas at the Orleans Arena! Tickets for the entire conference can be bought online.

 

Meet your Alumni Relations staff  in Las Vegas for an Alumni Happy Hour event on March 12th from 4-6pm. We hope to see all Seattle U Alumni there. Stay tuned for more details.

 
  
28th Anniversary Alumni Awards Celebration
Seattle University Campion Ballroom | Tuesday April 16th, 2013 

Join us as President Sundborg, the Seattle University Alumni Board of Governors and the Office of Alumni Relations announce the Alumni Award winners for 2013. More information, including registration details to come.

 

SU Athletics Red Tie Celebration
Saturday, May 18, 2013| Grand Hyatt Downtown Seattle| 5:00 pm

We are excited to announce Jim Whittaker as our honoree for this year’s event. Jim was the first American to summit Mt. Everest in the spring of 1963 and we are honored to celebrate the 50th anniversary of his accomplishment. The evening will feature an exciting auction, elegant dining and fabulous program highlighting the achievements of both Jim Whittaker and the highlights from the 2012-2013 SU athletic season. Contact redtie@seattleu.edu for more details.