SU Voice Alumni Blog

A Lenten Reflection

Posted by Peter Ely, SJ on February 28, 2017 at 4:02 PM PST

We begin Lent, this wonderful six-week opportunity to open ourselves to the grace of Christ. I like to begin mid-season with the Fourth Sunday of Lent, Laetare Sunday. Laetare means to rejoice. The priest wears the joyful color of violet or rose; instrumental music is permitted, and the altar may be decorated with roses. Some people think this joyful Sunday in the midst of Lent is an interlude in the sober discipline, a sort of break to allow us to catch our breath. My interpretation is a little different. Joy is, in fact, the underlying spirit of Lent as a whole.

Why joy? Isn't it a penitential season with fasting and self-denial, somber purple vestments, no flowers on the altar, and a minimal amount of music? Aren't we encouraged to give up things that give us pleasure, like chocolate or maybe gossip? It is all that. But if we look at the purpose of the sobriety and the invitation to self-denial, we can see why it's a season of joy. The no-frills restraint in the liturgy and our personal lives aims to put us in touch with deepest foundation of our lives, the healing and redeeming grace of Jesus Christ. We get down to the basics. And that is a source of joy, not pleasure, not fun, not excitement but the joyful sense of being in touch with our deepest selves. 

We live distracted lives. Lent calls us back. "Come back to me with all your heart, don't let fear keep us apart." This invitation contained in the opening words of a common lenten hymn always catch me by surprise and lift up my heart. I want to come back. Sometimes I'm amazed at how far I have wandered. The first reading, from Genesis, for the First Sunday of Lent tells the story of how Adam and Eve, tempted by the serpent, let distrust of God, their gracious benefactor, enter their lives and lead them to turn away in disobedience. They suddenly became ashamed of their nakedness, embarrassed to walk with God, subject to hardship, alienated from one another and the earth. In the Gospel reading of this same First Sunday, Jesus is tempted too. But he resists and grounds himself in his identity as the Son of God, the second Adam, our Savior. 

We’re called to do what Jesus did. Look at our temptations, which are nothing more than illusions about what will make us happy and improve the world. And turn to God. When we do that we will experience what Jesus did at the end of his forty days: “Then the devil left him and, behold, angels came and ministered to him.” It’s a joyful time.

Celebrating 50 years: Couples of 1967

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, '18 on February 2, 2017 at 11:02 AM PST

This May 5-7 all alumni are invited back to campus to celebrate 125 years of Seattle University at Grand Reunion Weekend. For some, their time at Seattle U is not all they have to celebrate. We sat down with two couples from the class of 1967 who are not only planning to come back for their 50th reunion, but to revisit the place where they met and fell in love.

Gary and Diane Buckley

Diane Faudree grew up in Seattle. As an active Catholic in the area, Seattle U was always a part of her community. Attending Seattle University seemed an obvious choice for her, especially after receiving a scholarship.

Seattle University was an easy choice for Gary Buckley because of family ties. His family lived on Queen Anne for four generations in their family home from 1905. Gary attended a Jesuit prep school in Portland and going on to attend a Jesuit University seemed a natural fit.  “There was something easy about going to Seattle U because I would be near relatives and could go home on the weekends,” Gary said.

Diane and Gary embraced campus life and were active in a number of student groups. Diane was a member of the Spurs and the Silver Scrolls, dorm advisor of Mary Crest and officer for the Association of Women Students. She was also involved in Seattle University’s community outreach program, teaching CCD to local students and providing support to children with disabilities at Pacific School.

Gary was in Alpha Sigma Nu and editor of the Journeyman, where he wrote philosophical commentary for the Spectator.

It was in the student religious program that the two met and a special friendship began to form. Diane broke the ice by asking Gary to the TOLO dance the last month of freshman year. While they began dating as freshman, things didn’t get serious until their junior year.

“We were the perfect evolution of a compatible marriage,” Diane said, “because we were friends first and that evolved into a romantic friendship, then marriage.”

In June of 1967 Diane and Gary graduated and on August 5th they were married.

After a stint in the Navy during the Vietnam War, Gary received his graduate degree from the University of Denver and the two moved to Arizona where they had three sons and enjoyed long careers in education. 

While out of state, they did their best to keep in touch with Seattle U, maintaining relationships with Jesuits and college friends and actively reading the SU magazine.

“The Jesuit tradition is so a part of us,” Diane said, going on to share that, “as a married couple the impact of a shared education has helped us through many things…your faith grows and it becomes the foundation you set for yourself.”

The last time Diane and Gary attended a Seattle University reunion it was the university’s 100th anniversary, 25 years ago.  Despite missing past reunions, they’ve still had opportunities to visit campus over the years, “We love being back on campus. It changes so much every time we visit that it’s fun to try and guess where we are.” For their 50th reunion this May, they have their calendars marked. They are excited to reconnect with classmates they have not seen for years and to celebrate the milestone of 125 years of Seattle University. 

Kathy and Larry Buzzard

Kathy Mullan and Larry Buzzard enjoyed their time at Seattle University, Kathy so much that she joined the planning committee for her 50th class reunion happening this spring. It wasn’t just the fact that she met her future husband, Larry, at Seattle U – it was because they both had a wonderful college experience.

Kathy toured a number of Catholic universities before deciding on Seattle University. Larry came to Seattle U on a baseball scholarship.

Kathy was a Spur, a member of the ski club and a song leader traveling to games to support Seattle U with cheers. The two knew each other for years and even had classes together but it wasn’t until a friend set them up January of junior year that they started dating.

A memorable date for Kathy and Larry was the time they drove to Portland for a game and his car broke down.  Larry realized that Kathy could be “the one” when she didn’t complain one bit. By April, the two were engaged and that September they were married in the same church as Kathy’s parents and grandparents. Though not a Catholic, Larry still regularly attends church with Kathy.

Larry and Kathy agree that they had a great time at Seattle U. “We feel as if we got a super education,” Kathy said, “and we loved the Jesuit approach. Though we both disliked the minor in philosophy, we agree it was beneficial.”

One of their favorite memories from school was when Seattle U beat the number one basketball team in the country, Texas Western, in double overtime. “It was a huge highlight for the whole class,” Kathy said.

Larry was the first in his family to go to college and appreciated his time at Seattle U. He taught for twenty years and started his own business, which he attributes to his Seattle U education.

As a member of the Class of 1967 Reunion Committee, we asked Kathy what message she had for her classmates. She said, “I’m super excited to see people I have not seen in 50 years. It’s so fun to get reacquainted and learn what’s happened in people’s lives, a great thing to do at our age. I hope everyone shows up.”

 

 

Dine Out Day: Homecoming Gets a New Tradition

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on February 1, 2017 at 4:02 PM PST

As we begin our 5th annual Homecoming, we have a great new way to engage our community. We are excited to invite you to participate in the newest addition to the Homecoming schedule Dine Out Day.

Dine Out Day takes place throughout lunch and dinner on Friday, February 3 and gives alumni, students, faculty and staff the opportunity to pay it forward to the community that supports us. Invite your friends and bring your family to your favorite eateries on Capitol Hill and in the International District.  

There are 18 restaurants participating, including:

Ba Bar Restaurant
Byrek & Baguette
Cedars on Broadway
Cherry Street Coffee House (12th & James Location)
Katsu Burger (Capitol Hill location)
Lark
Nate's Wings & Waffles
Niche Gluten Free Cafe & Bakery
Nue
Oma Bap
Optimism Brewing Company
Rhein Haus Seattle
Rooster'sTex Mex
Seven Beef Steak Shop
Slab Sandwiches & Pie
Soi
Southpaw
Taste of the Caribbean

Not only is this a great excuse to take a lunch or grab dinner with friends, but the first 20 guests will get a voucher for two free tickets to the Homecoming basketball game on Saturday night.

Dine Out Day isn’t the only reason to get excited about Homecoming. We have events for everyone!

Don’t miss:

Day of Service | "Serving Together"
Locations and times vary by service site. 
Live the mission of Seattle University by serving the community with fellow Seattle U alumni and students. Space is still available, but online registration is now closed. Please email mendozak@seattleu.edu if you still want to participate. 
 
Hall of Fame Luncheon
12:00-2:00 p.m.
Campion Ballroom  

The Seattle University athletics department invites you to celebrate all members of the Seattle U Athletics Hall of Fame. 

Pre-Game Redhawk Rally | 6:00 p.m.
Coke Corner 
KeyArena

Join Seattle U for a rally to get pumped up for the big game. Enjoy free food and a cash bar! 

Men's Basketball Game | 7:00 p.m.
Seattle U v. Utah Valley

KeyArena
Use promo code SUALUM to get Buy One, Get One FREE tickets.
Purchase your tickets now.

Post-Game (Victory) Party 
Buckley's
Win or lose, grab a drink with your fellow Redhawks and celebrate another great Homecoming Weekend. 

We look forward to celebrating with you this weekend.

Go Redhawks!

Serving Together: Alumni Day of Service

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, '18 on January 5, 2017 at 4:01 PM PST

Serving Together for 125 Years!

Each year, Seattle University alumni live out our Jesuit values by serving the local community during Alumni Day of Service. This signature experience during SU’s Homecoming Weekend will take place on Saturday, February 4. As part of SU’s 125th Anniversary, we are placing the emphasis on bringing it back home by serving organizations who partner with the Seattle University Youth Initiative and who are located within the First Hill/Capitol Hill neighborhoods.

This popular event will now include current students along with family, friends and fellow Jesuit-educated alumni. Participants will engage in service projects, ranging from beautification and archiving historical artifacts to preparing math kits, sorting charitable donations and more.

In order to build community, we are hosting a kickoff breakfast for all volunteers. Get to know other volunteers for your service site and get your limited edition Homecoming shirts. You don’t want to miss it.

If that isn’t enough to entice you to participate, all volunteers will get up to four free tickets to that evening’s Homecoming basketball game and alumni rally at KeyArena. Grab your family and friends and cheer on the Redhawks as they take on Utah Valley!

Want to take on more of a leadership role? All alumni are welcome to be volunteer site leaders! Check out the projects that still need site leaders and choose the one that most appeals to you. Once you’re a site leader, start recruiting your friends and family to volunteer with you. It’s that easy!

Alumni Day of Service Kick-Off Breakfast
7:30 a.m.
Rolfe Room | Admissions and Alumni Building
824 12th Ave.
Seattle University

AlleyCat Acres
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Seattle, WA 98144

Access to Justice Institute / Public Interest Law Foundation
HOSTED BY SU LAW SCHOOL ALUMNI
Time TBA
Sullivan Hall, Seattle, WA 98122

Childhaven
Time TBA
Seattle, WA 98146

Filipino American National Historical Society
HOSTED BY THE FILIPINO ALUMNI CHAPTER
9 a.m. - noon
Seattle, WA 98122

The Food Bank @ St. Mary's
HOSTED BY THE AFRICAN AMERICAN ALUMNI CHAPTER
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Seattle, WA 98144 

Full Life
HOSTED BY SU NURSING SCHOOL ALUMNI
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Seattle, WA 98104

Habitat for Humanity Southcenter
10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Tukwila, WA 98188

Keiro Northwest
HOSTED BY THE BOSTON COLLEGE SEATTLE ALUMNI CHAPTER
9:30 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Seattle, WA 98122

Mary’s Place
HOSTED BY THE FORDHAM UNIVERSITY SEATTLE ALUMNI CHAPTER
10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Seattle, WA 98121

NAVOS
HOSTED BY THE ALUMNI BOARD OF GOVERNORS
9 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Burien, WA

St. Francis House
HOSTED BY THE WOMEN OF SU ALUMNI CHAPTER
9 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Seattle, WA 98122 

Sustainable Capitol Hill - Tool Library
HOSTED BY THE SU FACULTY & STAFF ALUMNI CHAPTER
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Seattle, WA 98122

Zeno
HOSTED BY THE STUDENT ATHLETE ALUMNI CHAPTER
10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Get all the details and a complete list of service sites on our website.

Here is what past participants have had to say about Day of Service.

"The experience was wonderful and it was a chance to give back to the community." 

"It was meaningful to literally get my hands dirty doing service work."

"Most of us are too busy to think about the less fortunate in our community. This event provided a reminder and an opportunity to ‘give back.’"

"I enjoyed meeting other caring people, especially recent graduates who don't have a lot of spare cash but who want to give to the less fortunate."

"I really enjoyed working with people from a variety of backgrounds, schools, and ages..."

Register today and join alumni, friends and current students to make a difference!

 

"Why I Can't Wait for Grand Reunion Weekend" Alumni Spotlight: DJ Weidner, '07

Posted by Caitlin Joyce, '11, '18 on January 5, 2017 at 4:01 PM PST

As a member of the Alumni Board of Governors and now a Reunion Committee Chair for the class of 2007, DJ Weidner, ’07, is what we would call an engaged alum, though SU pride is nothing new to DJ.

DJ did a little bit of everything as a student. He was a Sullivan Scholar, an active member of Campus Ministry and the Search community, and attended a service immersion trip to Belize. DJ was a lead on the new student retreats, and an Orientation Advisor (OA) and Orientation Coordinator.

Outside of Campus Ministry and New Student Programs, DJ worked at the Spectator and was active with Associated Students of Seattle University. “For a short stint, I was the Chair of Battle of Bands for SEAC before I had to resign due to an internship I took with the Washington State Senate. I dabbled in rec sports, tried to start a spirit group called the DIRRTY BIRDS that eventually gave way to the Red Zone and generally tried to be as involved as possible.”

DJ found his passion for Seattle University embodied by a much loved member of the SU community, the late Fr. Roger Gillis. “It was during orientation that I met Fr. Gillis. He was the ‘Dancing Jesuit.’ He was gregarious, full of joy and unabashedly himself. For me, that represented Seattle U, the Jesuits and everything the university stood for. Be yourself, love as hard as you can, recognize that we’re all part of this community and find joy in every moment.”

DJ graduated from Seattle University with a degree in political science, but now works in the marketing and advertising field. As a recent graduate of Seattle University, DJ worked for SU’s marketing and communications department where he managed university social media accounts. In his current role, DJ is a Director of Integrated Marketing for Rational Interaction. It was the critical thinking skills and liberal arts education that helped DJ adapt his political science major into a career in marketing.

DJ has stayed involved with Seattle U long after graduation. He has been on the Alumni Board of Governors (ABOG) for over 4 years - an experience that he calls “really rewarding.” DJ also volunteers his time to attend mentorship fairs, networking nights and makes sure to come out for social events. That leads us to DJ’s newest volunteer role with the university, a Class of 2007 Reunion Committee Chair.

Grand Reunion Weekend will be celebrated May 5-7, 2017 with all alumni invited back to campus for a weekend of milestone reunions, club and organization reunions, family events, receptions and the Seattle U Birthday Bash complete with entertainment. We will celebrate six milestone reunions, including the class of 2007. We asked DJ, as a member of the planning committee, what we can expect from the weekend.

“I don’t want to give too much away, but what I can say is that this is the weekend you want to come back to campus. When was the last time you were back on campus? If you haven’t been back in 10, 20, 30, 40 or 50 years, it’s probably time to check it out! This weekend is going to be great! Everyone is invited and everyone is encouraged to attend – regardless of the year you graduated. Really, this weekend is about gathering as a full community to celebrate. Seattle U, unlike a lot of other institutions, is much more connected by the communities you were part of rather than your specific class year. We acknowledge that and want to create places around the campus where everyone can gather, reconnect and celebrate.”

Join DJ and your classmates at Grand Reunion Weekend! Our Grand Reunion Weekend website has a complete weekend schedule, registration information and a place to share your pictures and memories.

“I encourage people to reach out, see who is going and pencil that weekend in for a good time!” DJ concluded.

Alumni Professionals Wanted!

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on January 5, 2017 at 2:01 PM PST

The value of attending a university is not just the education you receive, but the network of alumni available to you as both a student and after graduation. The SU Bridge Young Alumni Chapter wants to give Seattle University students the opportunity to build valuable connections with alumni before graduation. How are they doing this? One way is the Insider’s Guide to Getting Ahead networking event. In partnership with the Student Alumni Ambassadors, the SU Bridge hosts a night where students and young alumni get a brief overview on networking best practices, then meet with alumni professionals to get answers to their career related questions and to practice their new networking skills in a low-stress environment.  

The SU Bridge has successfully hosted this event for the past three years, but they hope this year to elevate the event and increase the number of alumni professionals. They need your help to be successful.  

We are looking for alumni volunteers to represent a wide variety of industries and fields,” Riley Gaffney, president of the SU Bridge, said. “We get students interested in everything from nursing and business, to marketing and the arts, just to name a few. We are hoping that all students find this a valuable experience, no matter their career goals.”  

Previous alumni professionals have found the opportunity to mentor students fulfilling.  “It feels good giving back to my university and helping a student figure out their professional goals. You know you are making a lasting impact and that’s what being an SU alum is all about.”  

The SU Bridge extends an invitation for all alumni to participate. “Alumni navigating the beginning of their careers and those who are experienced all have something valuable to share.”  

The event is Monday, February 13, from 6-8 p.m. in Seattle University’s Student Center.  

If you are interested in volunteering as a professional at Insider’s Guide fill out this online form. It’s a small time commitment that can provide a big impact on our students and recent alumni.

SU Baseball Set its Sights on the NCAA Tournament

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on January 5, 2017 at 2:01 PM PST

If you’re a supporter of Seattle U athletics, than Seattle U’s baseball team should already be on your radar.  

Seattle U baseball had quite a season in 2016, winning its first regular season WAC conference and head coach, Donny Harrel, was named the WAC Coach of the Year. We sat down with Harrel to reflect on his last eight years with the Redhawks and to get a look at the season ahead.  

Harrel has been with the Redhawks since they transitioned back to Division 1 in 2010. The team has experienced a lot of growth, success and increasing national attention.  

We have gone from 11 wins in our first season back in 2010 to 37 wins last year and the first conference championship in school history. Also, for the first time in our young history, we received votes on the national level as a top 40 program. Even though we did not break into the top 40 - we did receive votes and that is a good feeling that other programs see us being as good as we expect ourselves to be.”  

In the past two years, five Seattle U players have been picked in the Major League Baseball amateur draft, including, Brock Carpenter for the Dodgers, Mike McCann for the Royals, Landon Cray for the Rays, Will Dennis for the Orioles and Brian Olson for the Twins.  

Players who are signed during their junior year, often stick around to complete their education and practice with the Redhawks. Seattle U’s quarter systems makes it possible for the players to attend class before the season starts. Harrel says a benefits of this is that newcomers have the opportunity to practice and build relationships with professional athletes around them who are living their dreams and getting an education. 

For Harrel, the relationships play a big role in the success of the team. “The key for our team is trust and buying into the program. I truly feel our approach is as personal as any program in the country. We develop a strong relationship with the student athletes and their families prior to them coming to Seattle U. This allows both sides to truly know the needs and expectations from all parties. For these reasons - we are very careful of the recruits and people we bring in because they have to fit our culture.” 

What can you expect from the Redhawks this season? “We once again have the immediate goal of winning our conference, but also expect to play in an NCAA regional for the first time in school history. Our goals moving forward are to stay on top and be a national name that people recognize in the baseball world. We also want to be known for a place where students can play high caliber baseball and along the way, get a tremendous education and be well prepared for the real world. Our legacy needs to come from what our players are able to do after Seattle U, not just what we are accomplishing while they are here.” 

Our players are already having a lasting impact on the community outside of their sports careers. Many volunteer with Seattle food banks, Seattle Children’s Hospital and the Boys and Girls Club. “These young men are future leaders of our community. I want our alumni to be proud of what we are doing and will continue to do in the future. All the credit goes to our student athletes who truly believe in making this world a better place. That is SU baseball! 

You can show your support for our Redhawks by coming out to games and cheering for them this season. A season schedule is online, but make sure to mark your calendars for the two matchups between the Redhawks and the Huskies on April 25 and May 9.  

Can’t wait for the season to start? On Friday, January 27, the Seattle U baseball team is hosting Meet the Redhawks, a fundraiser that gives attendees a chance to meet the players, share a meal with them and help raise funds for future projects and facilities. Seattle Mariners Manager Scott Servais will be this year’s guest speaker. You can learn more and get tickets for Meet the Redhawks here. 

We hope to see you supporting Seattle U baseball this season. Go Redhawks!

Pilgrimage: The Search for Pope Francis

Posted by School of Theology & Ministry and the Institute for Catholic Thought and Culture on December 1, 2016 at 4:12 PM PST

Mark K. Shriver is the author of the best-selling memoir, A Good Man: Rediscovering My Father, Sargent Shriver and president of Save the Children Action Network. For his newest literary work, Shriver went in search for the heart and soul of the real Pope Francis in the slums of Argentina and the halls of the Vatican. Seattle U will host Shriver on December 7 for a discussion of his surprising, informative and moving journey and his new book, Pilgrimage: My Search for the Real Pope Francis.

A down-to-earth and deeply intimate portrait of Pope Francis and his faith, Pilgrimage is based on interviews with the men and women who knew him simply as Jorge Mario Bergoglio. By setting an example of humility and accessibility, Francis breathed new life into the Catholic Church, attracting the admiration of Catholics and non-Catholics alike. In Pilgrimage, Shriver retraces Francis' personal journey, revealing the origins of his open, unpretentious style and explaining how it revitalized Shriver's own faith and renewed his commitment to the Church.

As president of Save the Children Action Network, Shriver leads an effort to mobilize Americans to end preventable maternal, newborn and child deaths globally and to ensure that every child in the U.S. has access to high-quality early childhood education. His career fighting for social justice in advocacy and service organizations, as well as elected office, has focused on advancing the right of every child to a safe and vibrant childhood.

Shriver joined Save the Children in 2003, serving as Senior Vice President for U.S. Programs until 2013. In that capacity, he created and oversaw the agency’s early childhood education, literacy, health and emergency preparedness and response programs in the United States.

In 2015, Shriver was the Seattle University undergraduate commencement speaker.

We hope you will join us for this free event.

Pilgrimage: The Search for Pope Francis
With Mark Shriver
Moderated by Enrique Cerna, KCTS9-Directory of Community Partnerships
December 7, 2016 | 7 p.m.
Pigott Auditorium | Seattle University

This Seattle U 125th Anniversary Event is in partnership with Elliott Bay Bookstore Company, KCTS 9, the School of Theology and Ministry and the Institute for Catholic Thought and Culture.

Alumni Awards Nominations Open

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on September 2, 2015 at 4:09 PM PDT


Each year the Alumni Board of Governors honors six outstanding members of our Seattle University community at the annual Alumni Awards Celebration.  Nominations are now open and we need you to nominate accomplished alumni and faculty.  The awards celebrate Seattle U community members who demonstrate significant impact, service to others, exceptional leadership and a commitment to our Jesuit values.

Winners are awarded in the following six categories:

  • Alumna/us of the Year - For outstanding leadership and service to the community and Seattle University.
  • University Service - For outstanding service to the University (alumni and non-alumni are eligible).
  • Community Service - For exceptional service to the community through volunteer or professional activities.
  • Professional Achievement - For outstanding achievement in the professional arena.
  • Distinguished Faculty - Presented to a Seattle University faculty member who has made a special contribution to students and the university.
  • Outstanding Recent Alumna/us - Presented to an alumna or alumnus who graduated in last ten years for outstanding leadership and service to the community and to Seattle University.

We need your help! 

As alumni of Seattle University, you are in the perfect position to know alumni and faculty deserving of recognition.  Help us celebrate the outstanding contributions of our Seattle U community by nominating someone for an alumni award today.

Who Do I Nominate?

We’ve included some examples of past winners below to give you an idea of what we look for in our nominees. 

Alumnus of the Year 2013 Winner – Gordon McHenry, Jr.,’79

As former executive director for the Rainer Scholars and current president and chief executive of Solid Ground, Gordon McHenry has a unique blend of private and public sector leadership experience. McHenry has stayed connected to Seattle U by serving on the Alumni Board of Governors, the Board of Regents and as a Trustee for eleven years.

Outstanding Recent Alumnus 2015 Winner – Derek Rogalsky, ‘10

Derek Rogalsky is an accomplished, nationally recognized Georgetown Medical School student and a former Haiti relief volunteer who taught biology and religion and coached soccer for a Catholic co-educational boarding school.

Professional Development 2015 Winner– Dr. Margaret Heitkemper, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, '73

An exceptional leader and innovator integrating basic scientific research into the practice of nursing, Dr. Margaret Heitkemper inspires colleagues with her cutting edge approach to health care. Internationally recognized, Heitkemper was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

Distinguished Teaching Award Winner 2014 – Greg Magnan, Ph.D.

Dr. Greg Magnan is an award winning business professor, nationally recognized for his research and a favorite among graduate and undergrad students.  He is an innovator, pioneering online education at Seattle U.

University Service Award Winner 2015 – Joe Zavaglia,’71

A university supporter, ambassador and soccer alumnus, Joe is the founder of the SU men’s soccer team.  Joe co-chaired the Championship Field redevelopment project, was inducted into the Athletics Hall of Fame, helped launch the annual Red Tie event and serves on the Board of Regents.

Community Service Award Winner 2014 – M. Lorena Gonzalez,’05

Lorena Gonzalez is  a nationally recognized civil rights attorney, former senior advisor and legal counsel to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and a current candidate for Seattle City Council. She established a community-private partnership that runs a free monthly bilingual legal clinic which has provided legal services to more than 2,000 low-income Seattle residents since 2007.

Know someone deserving of recognition?

Visit the Alumni Awards page to nominate them before October 23, 2015.

Thank you for your help celebrating Seattle University excellence. 

Seattle University Launches New School with Programs Aimed at Working Adults

Posted by Caitlin Joyce on August 3, 2015 at 12:08 PM PDT

Seattle University is accepting applications for two new bachelor’s degree programs for working adults that will be part of a new school. The School of New and Continuing Studies (NCS), the university’s ninth distinct college or school, will offer classes in the degree programs Digital Cultures and Organizational Leadership beginning next spring.

The new school was established to provide a high-quality Jesuit education designed for working adults by offering baccalaureate and certificate programs that support part-time study and feature hybrid courses, combining online and in-class instruction. An existing certificate program, Web Development, which is designed along these lines, will also be part of the new school. Plans call for NCS to offer additional degree programs in the future.  

The NCS degree programs are designed to meet the needs of working adults who have some college credit, mid-career professionals and veterans looking to enhance their careers by increasing their skill sets, and working adults who want to complete their college degree and may also be considering a new career.

“Seattle University is adding something new to the mix for adult learners who are traditionally underrepresented in higher education,” says Rick Fehrenbacher, dean of the new school. “Those who want the benefit of an outstanding Seattle University education, but for whom a traditional college experience is not accessible, can now turn to the School of New and Continuing Studies. The hybrid delivery of our courses will make an SU education available to students with even the busiest schedules.”

Prospective students applying for admission to Digital Cultures or Organizational Leadership must have the equivalent of 60 hours of college credit and a minimum 2.0 GPA.

Once underway in spring quarter, with classes beginning March 29, 2016, NCS programs will have a rolling admissions schedule, which allows students to begin their degrees year round. Students also can apply to NCS’s Web Development certificate program, which is beginning a new cohort this fall.

For more information about the new school and programs, visit http://www.seattleu.edu/ncs/.

A look at the degree programs

Digital Cultures: This program, designed for part-time students, offers an interdisciplinary liberal arts degree for the 21st century developed for returning students who are interested in using critical exploration and technological knowledge to understand how digital technologies reflect and transform culture and identity. Topics of study include game theory, global digital ethics and citizenship, the influence of social media and the history of digital technologies. Students will also learn applied technology skills such as basic coding and composing for the web. The Digital Cultures program strengthens transferable skills such as oral and written communication, problem solving, ethical decision-making and critical thinking, while also teaching students key practical technology skills such as basic coding and composing for the web. Graduates are prepared to transition into several different jobs such as social media specialist, technical writer, writing for the web, digital content production and digital editor.

Information:  www.seattleu.edu/ncs/degree-completion/digital-cultures/

Organizational Leadership: This interdisciplinary degree program is designed for part-time students who want to gain the leadership skills necessary to become effective, ethical and socially responsible leaders in a wide range of organizations from business, government and health care administration to nonprofit agencies and the service industry. Students will study topics including leadership theory and practice, organizational structure and behavior, organizational finance, ethics, managing diversity and change and organizational communication. The course of study integrates skills in leadership and organizational operations and links leadership theory to everyday practice. Students develop not only the practical skills and knowledge that leaders need to solve problems, think critically, communicate effectively and manage resources, but also learn to provide creative vision, facilitate collaboration, value diversity and balance multiple perspectives.