Authors and Presenters

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    Keynote Authors

    (In Alphabetical Order)

    Tracy Kidder

    "Mountains Beyond Mountains"

    Location: Campion Ballroom
    Time: 4:15pm-5:15pm

    Tracy Kidder Author PhotoTracy Kidder Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Tracy Kidder’s bestselling book Mountains Beyond Mountains (2003) tells the inspiring true story of Dr. Paul Farmer. A major force in revolutionizing international health, Farmer is the founder of Partners in Health, which strives to transform global health care by focusing on the poorest and sickest people, and to serve as an antidote to despair. Kidder will share reflections on his time with Dr. Farmer, a man who has changed the world with his dedication to the philosophy that “the only real nation is humanity.”

    Biography: Kidder’s exceptional and prolific writing career took off in 1983 with The Soul of a New Machine, a book celebrated for its insight into the world of high-tech corporate America that earned him a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award. Other bestselling works include House (1985), Among Schoolchildren (1989), Old Friends (1993), and Home Town (1999). Regarded as a master of nonfiction narrative, Kidder has enjoyed enormous success with Mountains Beyond Mountains and Strength in What Remains (2009).

    Mountains Beyond Mountains tells the story of charismatic humanitarian Dr. Paul Farmer and his efforts to address the global health crises of AIDS and TB through his nongovernmental organization Partners In Health. Strength in What Remains chronicles the tale of a young medical student, Deo, who survives the ethnic civil war in Burundi and emigrates to the US to find redemption through education and service to others. Both books are masterful accounts of real people who have prevailed against seemingly impossible circumstances to better our world. Tracy Kidder’s writing has appeared in numerous periodicals over the years, including The Atlantic, The New Yorker, Granta, and The New York Times. His latest book, Good Prose (2013), is a guide to the craft of nonfiction, written with his long-time editor Richard Todd. He is currently at work on a new book.

    Photo Credit: Gabriel Amadeus Cooney

    Links:


    Suki Kim

    "Without You, There Is No Us"

    Location: Pigott 104-Auditorium
    Time: 10:45am-11:45am

    Suki Kim Author PhotoSuki Kim Book CoverDescription of Presentation: The title of Suki Kim’s most recent book comes from a song students at the Pyongyang State University of Science and Technology in North Korea are required to sing three times a day, in praise of their country’s “Great Leader”: “Without you, there is no motherland. Without you, there is no us.” The book chronicles the six months Kim spent teaching English to 270 university students during the year of Kim Jong-il’s death—a turbulent time in North Korea’s already troubled history. Kim gained an intimate familiarity with her students—and the longer she spent with them, the more she understood the total control the North Korean regime exerted over their lives; from keeping them under constant observation to forcing them to report on each other’s behavior erasing all traces of a world outside the country’s borders from their worldview. In this keynote, Kim offers an unprecedented and surprisingly moving look into the day-to-day machinations of North Korea’s totalitarian regime through the lens of her own remarkable experiences.

    Biography: Suki Kim is the only writer to ever go undercover in North Korea. An award-winning novelist, Kim's obsession with the country led her to pursue journalistic assignments there beginning in 2002. Kim visited the country five times over a decade, witnessing both Kim Jong-il's 60th Birthday Celebrations and his death in 2011. Her six months in Pyongyang living and working as a teacher to the sons of North Korea's elite gave her unprecedented insights into the country's current state. Her work sheds new light on a place that has been, for the past seventy years, completely shrouded from the eyes of the world.

    In her most recent book, Without You, There Is No Us (2014), Suki Kim chronicles the time she spent in 2011 teaching the sons of North Korea’s elite. Working in disguise as a Christian missionary, Kim spent her days at Pyongyang State University of Science and Technology locked in what she calls the school’s “prison disguised as a campus,” recording everything she experienced on USB sticks in secret. Her talks delve deep into the realities of her day-to-day life in North Korea, drawing from her experiences to reveal the realities of what it’s like to live in a world where everything is controlled, closely monitored, and centered on a single “Great Leader.” Kim had unprecedented access to a side of North Korean culture most foreigners never get to see, and her insights about the country’s culture are as urgent as they are unsettling. Kim's first novel, The Interpreter (2004), was a finalist for a PEN Hemingway Prize, and she is the recipient of Guggenheim, Fulbright, and George Soro's Open Society fellowships. Her TED Talk on her time in North Korea received a standing ovation. She has been traveling to North Korea as a journalist since 2002, and her essays and articles have appeared in The New York Times, Harper’s, and The New York Review of Books. Fluent in Korean, she was born and raised in Seoul and now lives in New York.

    Links:


    Sam Quinones

    "Heroin, Shoelaces, Levi's and Walmart—The End of Community and Its Re-creation"

    Location: Campion Ballroom
    Time: 10:45am-11:45am

    Sam Quinones Author PhotoSam Quinones Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Mr. Quinones will talk about his new book, Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic (Bloomsbury, 2015), and tell the story of how widespread painkillers/heroin addiction is rooted in the corrosion of community in American life over the last thirty-five years, yet may also be helping recreate community.

    Biography: Sam Quinones is a Los Angeles-based freelance journalist and author of three books of narrative nonfiction. For his latest book, Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic, Quinones traveled across the United States.

    Dreamland recounts twin stories of drug marketing in the 21st Century. One story details how a pharmaceutical corporation flogs its legal new opiate prescription painkiller as nonaddictive. Meanwhile, immigrants from a small town in Nayarit, Mexico devise a method for retailing black-tar heroin (similar to marketing pizza in the US). These immigrants take their system nationwide, riding the wave of addiction to prescription painkillers from coast to coast, including parts of Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky and many others. The collision of those two forces has led to America's deadliest drug scourge in modern times.

    Quinones is formerly a reporter with the Los Angeles Times, where he worked for ten years (2004-2014). He is the author of True Tales from Another Mexico: The Lynch Mob, the Popsicle Kings, Chalino and the Bronx (University of New Mexico, 2001), and a collection of nonfiction stories about contemporary Mexico, which was released in 2001.

    In 2007, Quinones published his second book: Antonio's Gun and Delfino's Dream: True Tales of Mexican Migration. Sam Quinones is a veteran reporter on immigration, gangs, drug trafficking, and the border. Before coming to the LA Times, he worked in Mexico for ten years (1994-2004). Contact him at www.samquinones.com.

    Links:


    General Session Authors and Presenters

    Juliette Aristides

    This author is presenting at the Search for Meaning Art Exhibit. Find more info here.

    "On Seeing: Art as a Portal to Living More Fully"

    Location: Vachon Gallery-Fine Arts Building
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Juliette Aristides Author PhotoJuliette Aristides Book CoverDescription of Presentation: How we see affects our capacity to appreciate beauty, find meaning, and experience joy. It is the main subject of art and at the core of being human. In a high-speed culture we run the risk of skimming the surface of life. Studying drawing offers a space to cultivate our uniquely human sense of sight. Artist, educator, and author, Juliette Aristides, describes how learning to see holds a key to living more fully. In an age where everywhere can feel like nowhere, art opens a door to experiencing permanence and beauty—right here and right now.

    Biography: Juliette Aristides, a Seattle-based artist, author and educator, is the Director of the Aristides Atelier at the Gage Academy of Art in Seattle, WA. She is Vice President of the Da Vinci Initiative which brings skill based art education to K-12 public school teachers and students. Aristides is the author of The Classical Drawing Atelier, The Classical Painting Atelier, Lessons in Classical Drawing, and the upcoming Lessons in Classical Painting published by Watson-Guptill, NY and a frequent contributor to Artist’s Magazine. Aristides’ work has been featured in magazines such as Art Connoisseur, American Art Collector, American Artist, and Gulf Connoisseur Magazine. She exhibits art in group and solo exhibitions both nationally and internationally.

    Links:


    Ellen Bass, MA

    "Strange Angels: Poetry as a Path to Being Fully Present"

    Location: Sullivan Ct C5
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Ellen Bass Author PhotoEllen Bass Book CoverDescription of Presentation: How do we praise the world even as we are open-eyed to all its brutality and loss? How do we open our door to the strange angels of beauty and pain, love and death? Award-winning poet, Ellen Bass, will talk about poetry as one way to become more acutely awake to the human experience, to allow oneself to be transformed. Her vivid, tender, funny, unflinching poems will delight you, make you laugh, break your heart, and fill you with joy.

    Biography: Ellen Bass’s poetry has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, The American Poetry Review, and many other journals and anthologies. Of her most recent book, Like a Beggar (Copper Canyon Press, 2014), Toi Derricotte, Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets wrote: “The way Bass brings together the humble and the luminous in this elegant book sets it apart and makes it thrilling. Good poets help us to see the world in a new way; great ones open the mind to new ways of conceiving that world and our connections to it. Like a Beggar does this for me.”

    Bass’s previous poetry includes The Human Line (2007) and Mules of Love (2002). In 1973, she co-edited the groundbreaking No More Masks! An Anthology of Poems by Women (1973) and her nonfiction books include Free Your Mind: The Book for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Youth (1996), I Never Told Anyone (1991), and The Courage to Heal: A Guide for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse (2008) which has sold over a million copies and been translated into twelve languages.

    Among her awards are fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council, two Pushcart Prizes, the Elliston Book Award, The Lambda Literary Award, The Pablo Neruda Prize, the Larry Levis Prize, and the New Letters Prize. She teaches in the MFA writing program at Pacific University, at Salinas Valley State Prison, and at conferences and retreats worldwide. More information can be found at ellenbass.com.

    Photo Credit: Irene Young

    Links:


    Rhoda Berlin, MS, LMFT

    "Differences Seen and Unseen: So, Where ARE You From?" (with Harriet Cannon)

    Location: Pigott 106
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Rhoda Berlin Author PhotoRhoda Berlin Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Harriet Cannon and Rhoda Berlin, authors of Mixed Blessings: A Guide to Multicultural and Multiethnic Relationships (2013), are psychotherapists with unusual cultural identities. They will tell stories of how they integrated multiple cultural streams, and invite participants to join the adventure. The group will share their personal experiences on the search for identity and the question 'where are you from?'

    Biography: For almost thirty years, Rhoda Berlin has worked with individuals and families facing unique challenges that come with membership in minority populations. These challenges encompass searching for identity, and dealing with prejudice and discrimination due to ethnicity, social class, spiritual practice, or sexual preference. Her innovative approaches and perspectives make her stand out as a sought-after clinician, consultant, and presenter. Berlin challenges and supports others in exploring and understanding their own journeys, biases that may develop along the way, and how it all adds up in everyday life. As a second-generation Korean-American married to a German immigrant, mother to three grown multiethnic daughters living on three different continents, Berlin lives a truly multicultural life.

    Since 2009 Rhoda Berlin and Harriet Cannon have been a successful team presenting seminars on various aspects of cultural identity with sensitivity and humor. They are co-authors of Mixed Blessings: A Guide to Multicultural and Multiethnic Relationships, a book that Kirkus Review Magazine calls "…a must read for anyone who counsels or is part of a multicultural relationship…"

    Links:


    Sr. Mary C. Boys, EdD

    (This author is presenting at two separate sessions during the Festival)

    "Transforming Troubling Tellings: Redeeming Biblical Texts Used Sacrilegiously"

    Location: Pigott 100
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Sr Mary Boys Author PhotoSr Mary Boys Book CoverDescription of Presentation: What do we do with biblical texts that are both vital to the life of the church yet harmful to another religious tradition? Specifically, how do we unleash the spiritual power in the story of the passion and death of Jesus while acknowledging that this story has also served as raw material for harsh and hateful depictions of Jews as enemies of Christ, and thus of Christians?

    “Who Was Jesus of Nazareth?: Abrahamic Panel Discussion” (with Zeki Saritoprak and Rabbi Daniel A. Weiner)

    Location: Pigott 104-Auditorium
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Description of Presentation: Jesus of Nazareth has been one of the more enduring personalities of human history. However, people have had very different understandings about who he was, what he accomplished and the ultimate significance he has had on the human race. At different times, he has also been used to justify behaviors that contradict the very essence of his life and teachings. This fascinating panel will look at the Jesus of history through three very different prisms—Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The panel presenters will include an influential Muslim scholar, with a new book entitled Islam’s Jesus, a famous American Catholic religious woman and theologian; and, a highly-respected rabbi with deep influence in the Pacific Northwest and the nation. Come and find out just how complicated of a person Jesus of Nazareth really is ....

    Biography: Seattle native Mary C. Boys is the Dean of Academic Affairs and Skinner & McAlpin Professor of Practical Theology at New York City's Union Theological Seminary. Her first love is teaching—whether in the classroom or in a workshop or via the written word. A Roman Catholic and a member of the Sisters of the Holy Names, she has worked at a historically Protestant seminary for twenty-one years, and is involved in interreligious dialogue, particularly in Jewish-Christian dialogue at both the national and international levels. Author/editor of ten books, she believes that building friendships among people who differ religiously from one another is one of the most important tasks of our time.

    Photo Credit: Richard Madonna

    Links:


    Andrée Aelion Brooks

    (This author is presenting at two separate sessions during the Festival)

    "Jewish Women Challenging the World"

    Location: Pigott 101
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Andree Aelion Brooks Author PhotoAndree Aelion Brooks Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Jewish women have been the innovators behind countless social, political and artistic endeavors throughout the 2,000 years since biblical times. We will explore a sampling from different fields of endeavor: from the Jewish women philosophers of ancient Alexandria, the conversa women of the Renaissance period, to the fiery revolutionaries whose voices affected hearts and minds during the chaotic politics of the early 20th century.

    "The Amazing Life and Courage of Dona Gracia Nasi: The Richest Woman in 16th Century Europe"

    Location: Vachon Gallery-Fine Arts Building
    Time: (Sunday, February 28th, 2016) 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Description of Presentation: Women in the 16th century were not supposed to challenge authority. Yet Dona Gracia Nasi showed us that with sufficient savvy she could outwit the crowned heads of Europe. Her goal was to build an escape network that saved hundreds of her people—forcibly converted Jews who were being abused by the Inquisition. How did she do it? How were the documents found?

    Biography: Andrée Aelion Brooks is a journalist, author, and lecturer. For eighteen years she was a contributing columnist and news writer for The New York Times. Brooks is an Associate Fellow at Yale University and the founder and first president of the Women’s Campaign School at Yale, a program that teaches women how to run for elective office. She is also the author of a multi-media educational program for fifth through seventh graders in Sephardic history and culture called “Out of Spain.”

    In 1990, Brooks received the American Jewish Woman of Achievement award from the American Jewish Committee. In 2001, she received a special award for her work in Sephardic Jewish History. And in 2003, she received the Mark Twain Award from the Connecticut Press Club for her biography of Dona Gracia Nasi, the Renaissance banker and Jewish leader. The book was also a finalist in the National Jewish Book Awards. In the 1980's she was the author of another award-winning book Children of Fast Track Parents that was made into a PBS documentary. A later book, Russian Dance (2004), a romantic thriller based on the true story of a Bolshevik spy, won a first place award from the National Federation of Press Women in 2005. More information at andreeaelionbrooks.com.

    Links:


    Rev. Dr. Sandy Brown

    "The Pilgrim Way: Trekking through Italy with St. Francis"

    Location: Sullivan Ct C1
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Rev Dr Sandy Brown Author PhotoRev Dr Sandy Brown Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Pilgrimage has become an increasingly popular spiritual practice, with the world famous Camino de Santiago de Compostela attracting over 250,000 pilgrims from around the world each year. In this presentation, veteran pilgrim, activist, pastor and author, Sandy Brown, describes his own pilgrimage treks and life lessons from his most recent pilgrimage, the Via di Francesco. This trek, subject of his guidebook, covers sites relating to St. Francis of Assisi in a 350-mile, 28 day walk. Beginning in Florence, moving through Assisi and ending in Rome, the trek includes ancient, medieval, and modern sites of great historical and spiritual significance. The presentation includes stories and legends from the life of St. Francis and photos from the walk.

    Biography: Sanford 'Sandy' Brown is a community activist, long-distance pilgrimage walker and United Methodist minister from Seattle, Washington. He served churches in Fall City, Kirkland, Wenatchee, and, most recently, the historic First United Methodist Church of Seattle. From 2003-2008 he was Executive Director of the Church Council of Greater Seattle.

    After reading The Pilgrimage, by Paolo Coelho in 1992, he planned his 2008 trek on the Camino de Santiago and since then has walked over 3500 kilometers on pilgrim trails in Spain and Italy. He records his pilgrim adventures in his popular blog, www.caminoist.org.

    Sandy earned his undergraduate degree in medieval history at the University of Washington in Seattle, his MDiv at Garrett Theological Seminary, which honored him in 2006 as Distinguished Alumnus, and in 1997 earned a doctorate from Princeton Theological Seminary in gender, sexuality and spirituality. In his spare time he enjoys yoga, sailing, and piano. He has two grown sons and his life partner, Theresa Elliott, is a yoga master teacher.

    Links:


    Julia Cameron

    This author is presenting at the Search for Meaning Art Exhibit. Find more info here.

    "The Artist's Way: Creative Myths and Monsters"

    Location: Vachon Gallery- Fine Arts Building
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Julia Cameron Author PhotoJulia Cameron Book CoverDescription of Presentation: "Creativity is God's gift to us. Using our creativity is our gift back to God." - Julia Cameron. In this workshop, international bestselling author Julia Cameron will dedicate herself to helping you identify and unravel old and unworkable ideas that block your creative spirit.

    Is it time to stop telling yourself it’s too late? Is it time to stop waiting until you make enough money to do something you love? Is it time to stop thinking it's just your ego whenever you yearn for a more fulfilling life? Do you yearn for creative adventure? Do you wish you could find a more authentic 'you'?

    Stratagems will include Cameron's bedrock tools: Morning Pages and Artist Dates. She states, "If you work on your creativity, you will expand your spirituality. If you work on your spirituality, you will expand your creativity." In this workshop, you will experience an intensive, guided encounter with both.

    Biography: Julia Cameron has been an active artist for over four decades. She is the author of more than forty books, including such bestselling works on the creative process as The Artist's Way (1992), Walking in This World (2001), and Finding Water (2006), which have sold over four million copies worldwide. Also a novelist, playwright, songwriter and poet, she has multiple credits in theater, film, and television.

    Credited with founding a new human potential movement that has enabled millions to realize their creative dreams, Cameron eschews the title creativity expert, preferring instead to describe herself simply as an artist: “Artists have always mentored; I just do it on a wider scale.” She explains, “My books are not creative theory. They spring straight out of my own creative practice. In a sense, I am the floor sample of my own tool kit. When we are unblocked we can have remarkable and diverse adventures.”

    Cameron knows of what she speaks. A writer since the age of eighteen, Cameron has published highly praised short stories, award-winning essays, and hard-hitting political journalism. Her credits range from Rolling Stone to The New York Times. As a teacher, she has taught everywhere from The Smithsonian to Esalen, and The New York Times to Northwestern University, where she served as writer in residence in film.

    Links:


    Harriet Cannon, MC, LMFT, LMHC

    "Differences Seen and Unseen: So Where ARE You From?" (with Rhoda Berlin)

    Location: Pigott 106
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Harriet Cannon Author PhotoHarriet Cannon Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Harriet Cannon and Rhoda Berlin, authors of Mixed Blessings: A Guide to Multicultural and Multiethnic Relationships(2013), are psychotherapists with unusual cultural identities. They will tell stories of how they integrated multiple cultural streams, and invite participants to join the adventure. The group will share their personal experiences on the search for identity and the question 'where are you from?'

    Biography: Harriet Cannon received her Master of Counseling and Certificate in Addiction Studies from Seattle University in 1985. She has thirty years of clinical experience as a psychotherapist and intercultural consultant in the United States and overseas. Having worked and raised her children for years while living in South America, Harriet has a great affinity for the challenges faced by immigrants and migrant parents raising children in an unfamiliar culture. Since 2009, Harriet Cannon and Rhoda Berlin have been a successful team presenting seminars on various aspects of cultural identity with sensitivity and humor. They are co-authors of Mixed Blessings: A Guide to Multicultural and Multiethnic Relationships that Kirkus Review magazine calls "…a must read for anyone who counsels or is part of a multicultural relationship…"

    Links:


    Colette M. Casavant, MAPS, EdD

    "Questioning for Purpose: A Workshop on Career & Life Change Discernment" (with Joelle Pretty)

    Location: Pigott 103
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Colette CasavantDescription of Presentation: Q4P (Questioning for Purpose) is an interactive discernment workshop for people searching for direction. Participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their passions and sources of energy in their lives. Attendees will utilize journaling and paired discussions to draw out deep longings and inner wisdom.

    Biography: Colette M. Casavant is entering her ninth year with the Seattle University's School of Theology and Ministry, where she is the Assistant Director of Admissions and Student Services. She holds a Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies from the School of Theology and Ministry and a Doctorate in Education with an emphasis in higher education and student development.


    Palmer Chinchen, PhD

    ""Generation Justice: Understanding the Inseparable Connection Between Spiritual Formation and Social Justice""

    Location: Pigott 103
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Palmer Chinchen Author Photo Palmer Chinchen CoverDescription of Presentation: The church does well carrying people halfway spiritually, but unfortunately, a great majority of churched people rarely mature past the halfway mark. Our spirituality is underdeveloped. Something is desperately missing—doing justice. Social justice is not something God's people are called to after they mature spiritually; rather, growth happens as we pursue social justice. There's a kind of spiritual formation that only happens when you walk into the homes of the broken and walk with those who cry out for justice.

    Biography: Palmer Chinchen, a rising voice in the missional movement, is an author, speaker, pastor… and an expatriate. In his book The Barefoot Tribe (2014) he invites this generation of innovative creatives and social-entrepreneurs to pool their best wisdom, abilities, and passion to remake the world good and beautiful as God intended. His newest book Justice Calling: Live, Love, Show Compassion, Be Changed, will be coming out June of 2016.

    Chinchen is a relevant and engaging communicator who draws on his years of experience in Africa to pull the listener into the fabric of his message: Give your life away to change this world and God will change you. Chinchen speaks widely on issues of justice, spiritual transformation, and a Christian response to affliction and poverty. Chinchen spent many years in college ministry at Wheaton and Southern California universities, and earned a PhD at Trinity International University, and an MA and BA from Biola University.

    Chinchen grew up deep in the Sappo jungle of Liberia, Africa where the only way in and out was by prop plane. Today, Chinchen is the Lead Pastor of The Grove (in the Phoenix area), an innovative gathering of believers who live on mission to share God’s name around the globe. On a random Sunday called “Barefoot Sunday,” the people of the Grove walked to their cars barefoot, (on a 100+ degree day) leaving a mountain of shoes to send to Africa.

    Justice is a significant passion for Palmer, who regularly travels to places like Haiti, Cuba and Africa to help bring healing to a broken world.

    Links:


    Jim D. Currie

    "Personal and Planetary Healing: Keeping Spirit Alive When the Wheels Come Off"

    Location: Pigott 106
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Jim Currie Author PhotoJim Currie Book CoverDescription of Presentation: What are the commonalities between the breakdown in planetary systems and a healing crisis, and how can a person dealing with health issues tap their own resourcefulness in coping and recovery? Drawing upon his background in art, systems ecology, sports, and shoestring travel, Currie demonstrates how in the midst of his own crisis he was able to explore the root causes of his own breakdown and bring heart and spirit to the challenge. People are seldom as powerless as they may think. Emphasis is placed on lessons from Buddhism and Integral Psychology, as well as the mindset of accomplished artists, explorers, and healers.

    Biography: Jim Currie is a Seattle writer and ecologist whose credits include works of fiction, non-fiction, and over twenty publications on natural resource management and biology. He holds an honors degree from Harvard and a masters from Berkeley. His writing and teaching reflect an interdisciplinary perspective and wide-ranging curiosity in the arts, science, humanities, and philosophy.

    Currie’s published titles include In Dire Straits: Keeping Spirit Alive When the Wheels Come Off (Savant, 2012), and The Mindful Traveler: A Guide to Journaling and Transformative Travel (Open Court, 2000). His work in the environmental field includes innovative ways to protect water quality and habitat. His teaching and lecturing draws upon integral psychology and Eastern philosophy.

    Currie writes extensively on ecology, conservation and sustainable economy. His web-based organization, www.SydneysThumb.com includes members from across the globe and is dedicated to climate action, species rescue and travel that leaves shallow footprints.

    Links:


    Laura Da', MA

    "The Lyrical Counter Narrative: Drawing Poetic Inspiration from the Historical Record"

    Location: Pigott 100
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Laura Da Author PhotoLaura Da Book CoverDescription of Presentation: In the intersection of the personal, historical, and tribal exists a compelling counter narrative of Shawnee identity. This presentation focuses on Laura Da’s endeavor to examine the historical record for accounts of her Shawnee ancestors. Questions of perspective, sovereignty, and the impact of colonialism on both the individual and the community guide the content of this presentation.

    Biography: Laura Da’ is a poet and public school teacher. A lifetime resident of the Pacific Northwest, Da’ studied creative writing at the University of Washington and The Institute of American Indian Arts. Da’ is an enrolled member of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma. Her first chapbook, The Tecumseh Motel, was published in Effigies II (2014). The University of Arizona Press recently published her first full-length manuscript, Tributaries (2015). Da’ lives near Seattle with her husband and son.

    Links:


    Elizabeth Desimone, MS

    "Guatemala in My Blood-How Nursing in Remote Jungle Villages Revolutionized My Life"

    Location: Pigott 106
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Elizabeth Desimone Author PhotoElizabeth Desimone Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Come hear the adventures of this missionary nurse. Elizabeth Desimone will wear what she calls her Guatemalan finery, display exquisite weavings and read excerpts from her book, Guatemala in My Blood : How Nursing in Remote Jungle Villages Revolutionized My Life (2009). Her presentation describes the path that led from her comfortable Seattle home into the jungles of Guatemala. Learn how she survived and thrived in difficult circumstances, and her joy in community and friendship with the Kek'chi people.

    Biography: Elizabeth Desimone worked for forty-two years as a nurse. Her memoir, Guatemala in My Blood : How Nursing in Remote Jungle Villages Revolutionized My Life, recounts her most rewarding job. She won a grant from the Seattle Arts Commission for her book. Stories from the book were published in Clinician Reviews and Between the Heartbeats:Poetry and Prose by Nurses.

    Desimone’s features about memorable people have been published in newspapers. An article about her adopted daughter was published in Adoptive Families. She is completing books about single-parenting her adopted special needs daughter and a poignant, funny memoir about her nursing career.

    Links:


    Brian Doyle

    "A Reading From My Work"

    Location: Sullivan 105
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Brian Doyle Author PicBrian Doyle Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Brian Doyle will be reading from his essays and poems, which are in general about grace, pain, joy, giggling, unimaginable forgiveness, hawks, sneakers, children and other wild animals, mercy, the genius of Catholicism as a verb and the awkward thumping idiocy sometimes of it as a noun, the pleasure of achieving excellent bishops here and there, basketball as the greatest sport of all, humor as a weapon against the dark, and stories as glorious ways to give greed and violence the finger. Also maybe why Bruce Springsteen is the great catholic poet of our time.

    Biography: Brian Doyle is the editor of Portland Magazine at the University of Portland, in Oregon – “the finest spiritual magazine in America,” says Annie Dillard, clearly a woman of discernment. Doyle is the author of many books of essays and fiction, notably the novels Mink River (2010), The Plover (2014), and Martin Marten (2015); he is most recently the author of How the Light Gets In (2015) and So Very Much the Best of Us (2015).

    Photo Credit: Hob Osterlund

    Links:


    Elaine Dundon, MBA

    "MEANINGology® and The OPA! Way®" (with Alex Pattakos)

    Location: Sullivan Ct C6
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Elaine Dundon Author PhotoElaine Dundon Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Join Dr. Pattakos and Elaine Dundon as they introduce and discuss their unique concept of MEANINGology®, which is the practical, interdisciplinary study of how to find deeper meaning in our lives, work, and society. Pattakos and Dundon will also share a few lessons from their two best-selling books: The OPA! Way: Finding Joy & Meaning in Everyday Life & Work (2014), which is uniquely inspired by Greek philosophy, mythology, and culture, and Prisoners of Our Thoughts: Viktor Frankl’s Principles for Discovering Meaning in Life and Work (2010).

    Biography: Elaine Dundon, is co-founder of the Global Meaning Institute, an industry leader in the Meaning Movement through its leading-edge research, education programs, and strategic advising. Dundon is co-author of The OPA! Way: Finding Joy & Meaning in Everyday Life & Work, an award-winning book and new Meaning paradigm that is uniquely inspired by Greek philosophy, mythology, and culture. Dundon is also author of the international bestseller, The Seeds of Innovation (2002). She has an extensive background in Strategy, Leadership, and Innovation Management having worked in brand management with Procter & Gamble, Nestle, and Kraft, and having designed and taught the first integrated course on Innovation Management in North America in the business program at the University of Toronto, Canada.

    A sought after speaker and strategic adviser, she has advised hundreds of people in some of the world’s best businesses, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations. Her insights have been featured globally in numerous leading publications, including The Futurist, Global CEO India, HR Innovator, Journal of Quality and Participation, Leadership Excellence, among others. As her work evolved, Dundon’s focus shifted to the “Human Side of Innovation” and specifically, Meaning, which her experience and research show is the key area for determining success.

    To augment this work, Dundon earned a non-secular doctorate in Metaphysics with an emphasis on Greek philosophy. Now as a Philosopher of Meaning and creator of the MEANINGology® and Meaning Centered Leadership® programs, Dundon is dedicated to advancing the human quest for Meaning in everyday life and work. More information can be found at globalmeaninginstitute.com.

    Links:


    Rabbi Amy Eilberg

    “From Enemy to Friend: Jewish Wisdom and the Pursuit of Peace”

    Location: Pigott 101
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Rabbi Amy Eilberg Author PhotoRabbi Amy Eilberg Book CoverDescription of Presentation: The Psalmist exhorts us to “seek peace and pursue it.” Yet, conflict is a painful reality in our relationships, our communities, and our world. How can we serve the cause of peace in the midst of our own lives? We will study Jewish teachings on the imperative of working for peace and reflect on how we can strengthen our practice of becoming seekers and pursuers of peace.

    Biography: Rabbi Amy Eilberg is the first woman ordained as a Conservative rabbi by the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. After many years of work in pastoral care and hospice, Rabbi Eilberg now serves as a spiritual director, directs interfaith dialogue programs in Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN, and teaches at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. She travels widely, teaching the art of listening, dialogue, and conflict engagement in venues throughout the country. Her book, From Enemy to Friend: Jewish Wisdom and the Pursuit of Peace, was published by Orbis Books in March 2014.

    In From Enemy to Friend: Jewish Wisdom and the Pursuit of Peace, Rabbi Eilberg blends ancient Jewish sacred texts on peacebuilding, real life descriptions of conflict engagement—interpersonal, interreligious, intra-communal, and international—and contemporary conflict theory. The interweaving of personal story, sacred text, and theory demonstrates how relationships can move from estrangement and wounding, entrenched bigotry and fear, to positive, engaged encounter. What emerges is a portrait of peacemaking as a spiritual practice that can guide the lives of faithful people seeking peace in their lives and in the world. The book concludes with practical disciplines to cultivate the qualities of soul essential to the art of pursuing peace.

    Rabbi Eilberg is married to Dr. Louis Newman of St. Paul, Minnesota, and is the proud mother of one daughter and two step-sons.

    Links:


    Anita N. Feng, MFA, Zen Master

    "Sid: What Would the Life of Buddha Look Like if it were Lived Today?"

    Location: Pigott 102
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Anita Feng Author Photo Anita Feng Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Award-winning author, Anita Feng (Zen Master Jeong Ji), weaves the traditional take of Siddhartha with the story of Sid, an everyman who finds himself waking up amid the reality of work and family life in the modern world. Feng’s narrative embodies the perspectives of living one’s enlightenment in the world. Beautifully told with a blend of poetic prose and original art by artist Linda Davidson, Sid (2015) illuminates the story of Buddha’s life as one that could be our own.

    Biography: Anita Feng’s major writing awards include a National Endowment for the Arts grant, an Illinois Arts Council grant, a Washington State Grants for Artist Projects award and the Pablo Neruda Prize. Publications include two books of poetry, Internal Strategies (1995), published by the University of Akron Press and Sadie & Mendel (2006), winner of the Backwaters Press Prize. Individual works have been published by Nimrod, Ploughshares, Black Warrior Review, North American Review, Northwest Review, and Primavera among others. Her poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She teaches Zen at the Blue Heron Zen Community in Seattle, Washington, and works as a ceramic artist making raku Buddhas. Her sculptures can be found at http://golden-wind.com.

    Anita Feng (Zen Master Jeong Ji) has practiced Zen in the lineage of Zen Master Seung Sahn since 1976. In the late ‘70s she lived and studied intensively with Zen Master Seung Sahn at the Providence Zen Center. Since the ‘90s she studied under the guidance of Zen Master Ji Bong, receiving Inka in 2008, and full transmission as a Zen Master in 2015. She is the guiding teacher for Blue Heron Zen Community in Seattle, WA.

    Links:


    Wendell V. George, PE, BSEE

    "I am American (Indian)"

    Location: Sullivan 109
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Wendell George Author PhotoWendell George Book CoverDescription of Presentation: It is time to recognize the new breed of American Indians. Despite massive efforts to acculturate us we have not vanished. Centuries of cultural differences are being reconciled and the real purpose of life is being recognized. Wendell George, Colville Tribal elder, shares stories from his three books: Coyote Finishes People (2012), Last Chief Standing (2012), and Raven Speaks (2015). He offers in-depth discussions of the Indian way such as being one with nature and the mysteries of the Medicine Wheel.

    Biography: Wendell George has been an engineer, a Tribal Councilman, Corporate CEO, and a cattle rancher. He grew up on the Colville Indian Reservation and he and his family have helped their tribe through tumultuous times. His great grandfather was Entiat Tribal Chief Chilcosahaskt. His grandfather was Lahompt (Chief Koxit George). His dad, Moses, was a member of the first Colville Business Council in 1938.

    George served on the council in 1986-90 and was CEO in 1996-98. He has travelled extensively working with many of the 500 plus tribes. George wrote forty-eight articles for the Tribal Tribune about indian culture and history. He published three books: Coyote Finished the People, Last Chief Standing, and Raven Speaks. He wrote thirty-two articles for the Wenatchee World Newspaper. George spent fifteen years with Boeing as an electronics engineer after graduating from Washington State University. The highlight of his Boeing career was helping land a man on the moon on July 20th, 1969. It was prophetic when his dad said on January 2nd, 1968 that his great-grandfather’s name meant “grabbing or reaching for the sky.”

    Until retiring, George operated a cattle ranch in Kartar Valley on the reservation. He and his wife, Barbara, have six children who have seven college degrees and six grandchildren who are in college or high school. He has served on the Wenatchee Valley College Board of Trustees, the Paschal Indian School Board, and the Omak School Board. He now lives in Omak, Washington famous for the Omak Stampede and Indian Suicide Race.

    Links:


    Michael Golding

    "Learning to Live in the Invisible World"

    Location: Sullivan 110
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Michael Golding Author Photo Michael Golding Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Our lives are filled with beauty and grace, yet we often feel empty, confused, and disconnected.  How can we find the poetry in our everyday moments?  Novelist and screenwriter, Michael Golding, author of A Poet of the Invisible World (2015), believes that our deepest experience unfolds inside us, and that by shifting our search for meaning from the visible world to the invisible one, we can each find the poetry—and the poet—within.

    Biography: Michael Golding was born in Philadelphia and educated at Duke, Oxford, and the University of California at Irvine. He began his career as an actor, appearing in numerous Off-Broadway shows.  His first novel, Simple Prayers, was published in 1994 and has been translated into nine foreign languages. Benjamin’s Gift, his second novel, was published in 1999. His translation of Alessandro Baricco’s stage play Novecento opened the 2002 Edinburgh Festival and his screenplay adaptation of the best-selling novel Silk was a Featured Selection at the 2007 Toronto Film Festival.  His most recent novel, A Poet of the Invisible World, was published by Picador in 2015.

    Links:


    Kevin Grange

    "Searching for Meaning in the Land of the Thunder Dragon"

    Location: Sullivan 110
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Kevin Grange Author PhotoKevin Grange Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Kevin Grange tells the story of his 2007 trip along Bhutan's infamous, 216-mile Snowman Trek which took him into sacred valleys, tiny villages, and deep into the Himalayas in his book, Beneath Blossom Rain (2011). In this presentation, he'll show images taken along the way, discuss the differences in the search for meaning between Eastern and Western traditions and tell how it felt trekking for twenty-four days in a Tibetan Buddhist country that governs by a policy of Gross National Happiness.

    Biography: Kevin Grange graduated from Seattle University as well as UCLA's Paramedic Education Program and is an award-winning writer with the Society of American Travel Writers. He is the author of the memoir Lights and Sirens: The Education of a Paramedic (2015) and Beneath Blossom Rain, which recounts a twenty-four-day trek in the Himalayas. He currently works as a paramedic with the National Park Service.

    Links:


    Rev. Steven Greenebaum, MA

    "Spiritual Humility: The Faith of Interfaith"

    Location: Pigott 100
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Rev Steven Greenebaum Author PhotoRev Steven Greenebaum Book CoverDescription of Presentation: How might we reclaim our common humanity? Drawing from his book Practical Interfaith (2014), Steven Greenebaum suggests we embrace spiritual humility and a faith that there is no one “right” spiritual path. In this presentation we’ll explore a theology of Interfaith, as well as the practice of everyday Interfaith, as we create the safe sacred space to celebrate and respect our different spiritual paths. Interfaith shows us how we can come together at last to answer the universal call to love, compassion, and community.

    Biography: Reverend Steven Greenebaum, author of The Interfaith Alternative (2012) and Practical Interfaith, is an Interfaith minister with Masters Degrees in Mythology, Music, and Pastoral Studies. The study of myth taught him to appreciate the rich multitude of our planet’s spiritual traditions. Directing Jewish, Methodist, Presbyterian, Unitarian Universalist, and Interfaith choirs helped Steven understand the profound wisdom of so many of our spiritual traditions. In Pastoral Studies, Greenebaum spent time not only studying Scripture but also sharpening his own sense of the call of Interfaith.

    Greenebaum has dedicated his life to the oneness of humanity. In 2010, he founded the Living Interfaith Church in Lynnwood, Washington. Greenebaum states that “at present we are Muslims, Jews, Christians, Humanists, Buddhists, and Baha’i, all coming together to share and to celebrate our diverse spiritual paths without hierarchy.” Greenebaum has spoken about Interfaith across the United States and Canada, including speaking before the 2014 Big I: Interspiritual/Interfaith Conference. In response to one of the questions he is asked most often, he replies, “Interfaith is NOT a new religion. It is a faith.” Describing his own spiritual journey, Greenebaum says, “my faith is Interfaith, my spiritual path is Judaism, my tribe is humanity.”

    Links:


    Lesley Hazleton

    "Beyond Either/Or" (with Nancy Pearl)

    Location: Sullivan Ct C5
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

      Lesley Hazelton Author Photo Lesley Hazelton Book Cover NewDescription of Presentation: Best-selling librarian Nancy Pearl (Book Lust, 2003) and accidental theologist Lesley Hazleton (The First Muslim, 2014) explore the strange and absorbing business of being (and writing) in the world as they preview Hazleton’s new book Agnostic: A Spirited Manifesto (April 2016).

    Biography: In her four acclaimed books, writer, psychologist, and Stranger genius-award winner, Lesley Hazleton, traced the roots of the three great monotheisms in the ongoing struggle for social and economic justice, focusing on seminal figures including Mary, Elijah, and Muhammad. Now “the Accidental Theologist” (she describes her blog as “an agnostic eye on religion, politics, and existence”) explores her own agnostic stance in a new book, making a spirited argument for acknowledgment of the unknowable and for the vital role of both mystery and doubt in keeping us human.

    A floating Seattleite since 1992 (she lives and writes on a Lake Union houseboat), Hazleton has spoken in churches, synagogues, and mosques throughout the US and abroad, and her TED talks have attracted close to three million views worldwide.

    Links:


    Gareth Higgins, PhD

    "Storytelling and the End of Violence"

    Location: Pigott 102
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Gareth Higgins Author PhotoGareth Higgins Book CoverDescription of Presentation: The story told by dominant cultural voices suggests that the world is in worse shape than ever, and this way of telling apparently increases a sense of threat (which creates more discord), or apathy (which withdraws from the world in which change can happen). But this story isn't even true–as violence has actually declined over time. Irish writer, Gareth Higgins, illustrates his experience of both kinds of telling, and elaborates on the hope that a new way of telling the story will heal our deepest wounds.

    Biography: Gareth Higgins was born in Belfast in 1975, grew up during the Northern Ireland Troubles, in which his family experienced the impact of violence in profoundly challenging ways, and now he lives in North Carolina. Higgins writes and speaks about connection to the earth, cinema and the power of dreams, peace and making justice, and how to take life seriously without believing your own propaganda. He is happy to be a work in progress.

    Today, Higgins works writing, leading retreats, and co-creating festival spaces, all which focus on the idea of shaping a story that will help us live better. He believes that there can be no such thing as a sacred-secular divide, and that being human is the greatest gift—and opportunity—we each have.  Being in the world continues to amaze him.  We are called to transcend the violence, injustice, and poverty around and within us, by giving a cup of cold water to those who are thirsty, to visiting those who are hidden, and by providing warmth in the cold light of difficult days.  When we do this, we are disrupting a broken story that wounds, and telling a new one that heals.  We can do it creatively, with sonic booms that resonate to the soles of our feet, with light-borne images that cause us to see more clearly, and with words that make life feel like a long and utterly elegant poem.  No matter the form of creativity, the purpose is the same: to learn how to step into a story that helps us live better.

    Links:


    Wendy Hinman

    "There Must Be More to Life Than This: Creating the Life That You Want"

    Location: Pigott 109
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Wendy Hinman Author PhotoWendy Hinman Book CoverDescription of Presentation: It's easy to continue through our days following other people's priorities, but whose life is it anyway? Wendy Hinman, author of the hit travel book, Tightwads on the Loose (2012), will share how her search for a more satisfying life led her from successful business woman and entrepreneur to sailing 34,000 miles aboard a 31-foot sailboat and loving it despite facing many "character-building opportunities." Through these opportunities she realized that often the biggest challenges are the most rewarding, and are what make us feel most alive. She learned firsthand that we rarely know what we are capable of until we push ourselves well beyond our comfort zone. Though she's lived without what many would consider "necessities," Hinman has discovered a sense of humor is mandatory. While we sometimes can't change our circumstances, we can change how we respond to them and thereby transform our lives in the process. Hinman will share how her experiences shaped a philosophy that guides her life and can offer perspective on yours.

    Biography: Wendy Hinman is the author of the hit travel book Tightwads on the Loose: A Seven-Year Pacific Odyssey. A successful business woman and entrepreneur with an insatiable curiosity and zest for life, Hinman has never been willing to settle for the usual. A quest for adventure took her on a seven-year Pacific odyssey aboard a 31-foot boat with her husband during which she faced endless "character-building opportunities." Yet she fell in love with voyaging so much she hardly wanted to return, despite the fact that her husband could barely stand inside their tiny boat and, in stormy conditions, it occasionally turned into their own private torture chamber. Fortunately, she did return to share a humorous take on their adventures afloat and perspective on life in her book, Tightwads on the Loose. Hinman is an inspiring speaker, who offers refreshing philosophy and insight on following our dreams wherever they may lead. More information can be found at www.wendyhinman.com.

    Links:


    Dr. Charles Johnson, UW Professor Emeritus

    "Spirituality and Storytelling"

    Location: Sullivan Ct C1
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Dr Charles Johnson Author PhotoDr Charles Johnson Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Dr. Charles Johnson’s session will be a presentation on how spiritual practice is dramatized in literary fiction, with examples drawn from the author's stories and novels.

    Biography: Dr. Charles Johnson is a novelist, essayist, literary scholar, cartoonist, short story writer, and a MacArthur Fellow winner of the 1990 National Book Award for his novel Middle Passage (2012). Johnson is the recipient of an American Acadamy of Arts and Letters Award for Literature, and is Professor Emeritus at the University of Washinton

    Links:


    Rick Johnson, PhD

    "Openness, Discernment, and Self Realization: A Psychological-Spiritual Path to Sustainable Meaning"

    Location: Pigott 109
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Rick Johnson Author PhotoRick Johnson Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Many of us struggle periodically with disconnection and meaninglessness. A life journey with sustainable meaning must include a connection with our Real Self, the part of us that contains our inner wisdom and discernment as well as impulses for growth and creativity. This presentation provides an integration of psychological and spiritual themes that invite participants to embrace a process of discovery and health. The material is also applicable to therapists who want a model for integrating spirituality into psychotherapeutic process.

    Biography: Rick Johnson has a PhD in counseling psychology and is a professor in the Counselor Education Department at Portland State University (PSU). His scholarly interests, which include the psychosocial development of young adults and the integration of psychological and philosophical/spiritual health, have led to over twenty published articles in professional journals and two published books, Reclaiming Your Real Self: A Psychological and Spiritual Integration (2009) and Spirituality in Counseling and Psychotherapy: An Integrative Approach that Empowers Clients (2013). Johnson is currently finishing a young adult, existential-adventure novel, Conation. He is also a licensed psychologist and maintains an active private practice in Portland, Oregon. In his various roles as a teacher, psychotherapist, and writer, Johnson enjoys inspiring others to connect with their own inner wisdom as a guide in their lives.

    Links:


    Bharti Kirchner, MS

    "Goddess of Fire: A Humble Village Girl Empowers Her People"

    Location: Sullivan Ct C3
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Bharti Kirchner Author PhotoBharti Kirchner Book CoverDescription of Presentation: India, under the Mughals in the 1680s: A young village girl is destined to die on her husband’s funeral pyre. Rescued by a British merchant, she begins a new life as a lowly cook in the East India Company’s headquarters. Talented, motivated, and eager to pursue a better life, she learns English and the Company’s business practices and rises in the ranks. But her ultimate goal is to help the common people subjugated by both the Mughals and the British.

    Biography:Bharti Kirchner is the author of six novels and four nonfiction works. Her latest novel, Goddess of Fire, a historical novel, is due out February 2016. Her first novel, Shiva Dancing (1998), was chosen by Seattle Weekly to be among the top eighteen books by Seattle authors in the last twenty-five years. Library Journal said of her second novel Sharmila’s Book (1999): “Kirchner creates strong visual images of the colors and complexities of modern India, weaving them with effective characterization into a captivating novel. Highly recommended.” Kirkus Reviews praises her third novel Darjeeling (2003) thus: “A novelist and Indian cookbook author mixes a sensual and at times suspenseful transcontinental family saga as two sisters vie for the same man.” Her fourth novel Pastries: A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries (2003) was selected for the Summer 2006 Washington Reads Program.
     

    Kirchner’s work has been translated into many languages. She has won a VCCA (Virginia Center for the Creative Arts) Fellowship, several 4-Culture literature Grants, a CityArtist Project award, two Seattle Arts Commission literature grants, two Artist Trust GAP grants, and has twice been a Fellow of Jack Straw Productions. She has been honored as a Living Pioneer Asian American Author. Kirchner is also the author of four successful cookbooks, including The Bold Vegetarian (1994) and Vegetarian Burgers (1996).

    Kirchner’s articles and essays have appeared in magazines such as Food & Wine, Northwest Travel, Writer’s Digest, The Writer, and Fitness Plus and in ten anthologies. She is a freelance book reviewer for The Seattle Times.

    Photo Credit: Susan Doupe

    Links:


    Dr. David Korten, MBA, PhD

    "Change the Story, Change the Future: A Living Economy for a Living Earth"

    Location: Sullivan Ct C6
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    David Khorten Author PhotoDavid Khorten Book CoverDescription of Presentation: David Korten will share his thoughts on how we as humans chose our common future through our choice of the shared stories that define our common values, meaning, and purpose. He suggests that partial and outdated stories currently draw us into terminal crisis. Korten will share an emergent story that draws from all the many sources of human knowledge and understanding, and holds the potential to transform our relationships with one another and Living Earth, in order to unleash yet unimagined human possibilities.

    Biography: David Korten is co-founder and board chair of YES! Magazine, co-chair of the New Economy Working Group, president of the Living Economies Forum, an associate fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies, and a member of the Club of Rome. He is a founding board member emeritus of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies and a former founding associate of the International Forum on Globalization (IFG). Korten’s most recent books are Change the Story, Change the Future: A Living Economy for a Living Earth (January 2015) and the 20th anniversary reissue and update of his classic international best seller When Corporations Rule the World (June 2015). His other books include Agenda for a New Economy: From Phantom Wealth to Real Wealth (2010), The Post-Corporate World: Life After Capitalism (2000) and the international best seller The Great Turning: From Empire to Earth Community (2007).

    Korten has MBA and PhD degrees from the Stanford Business School. In his earlier career, he served as a captain in the US Air Force, as a Harvard Business School professor, as a Ford Foundation project specialist, and as an Asia regional adviser on development management to the US Agency for International Development. He lived and worked for twenty-one years as a development professional in Ethiopia, Nicaragua, Philippines, and Indonesia. Eventually, Korten realized that conventional economic development serves only corporations at the expense of people and the rest of nature, and returned to the United States to share the lessons he learned while abroad.

    Links:


    Sonya Lea

    "Intimacy in Public: The Art of Candor in Memoir"

    Location: Sullivan 109
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Sonya Lea Author PhotoSonya Lea Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Desire, adventure, friendship, sex, and love: women are writing ourselves as we truly exist, and not as some masculine mono trope. We go beyond the conventions of cultural identity and the need for redemption, to say how life really is. Using her memoir, Wondering Who You Are (Tin House 2015), as well as examples from the work of Meaghan Daum, Maggie Nelson, Vanessa Veselka, and more, Lea’s session will explore what is radical and becoming articulated by the feminine.

    Biography: Sonya Lea is a screenwriter, essayist, and memoirist. Her memoir, Wondering Who You Are is about her husband’s cancer treatment, through which he lost the memory of their life together. She has been awarded an international memoir prize for the story, which also won an Artist Trust Award. In July her memoir was named a Top Ten Book by the BBC, received a starred review by Booklist, and was a Book of the Week at WORD Bookstores.

    Peter Mountford says, "An incredibly intimate and honest memoir, Wondering Who You Are shows more vividly than any work of nonfiction I've read in years the endlessly complex and delicate nature of identity. In particular, the book movingly reveals how mutable all relationships are, how metamorphosis on one side of a partnership necessitates metamorphosis on the other—we are all constantly changing."

    Lea studied at UCLA's School of Film & Television, The Film School, and has a degree in English literature from Wilfrid Laurier University. Lea has written for Salon, The Southern Review, Brevity, The Butter, Guernica, Cold Mountain Review, The Prentice Hall College Reader, and others. She mentors students in the USA and is leading a pilot project to teach writing to women soliders through the Red Badge Project. Originally from Kentucky, Lea currently lives in Seattle, Washington.

    Links:


    Deborah Jian Lee, MS

    "Writing Through Doubt"

    Location: Pigott 103
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Deborah Jian Lee Author PhotoDeborah Jian Lee Book CoverDescription of Presentation: How do you write about faith when you feel like you have lost it? How do you write about your convictions when you feel the prickle of doubt? Award-winning journalist, Deborah Jian Lee, shares how she wrote honestly about her questions, doubts, skepticism, and faith when she reported on the progressive evangelical movement for her book Rescuing Jesus: How People of Color, Women and Queer Christians are Reclaiming Evangelicalism (Beacon Press 2015).

    Biography: Deborah Jian Lee is an award-winning journalist, radio producer, and author of Rescuing Jesus: How People of Color, Women and Queer Christians are Reclaiming Evangelicalism. She has worked as a staff reporter for the Associated Press, taught journalism at Columbia University, and is the 2016 Distinguished Visiting Journalist at Cornell College. Lee has written for Foreign Policy, Forbes, Slate, Reuters, GOOD, WBEZ, WNYC and others. She currently lives in Chicago.

    Links:


    Richard LeMieux

    "Never, Ever, Give Up Hope"

    Location: Sullivan Ct C1
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Richard LeMieux Author PhotoRichard LeMieux Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Hope is, for some, too painful to live with—their future appears set in drudgery. When we're simply "coping" with life, we too easily miss out on what's possible, and what's beautiful, in our everyday opportunities to love and appreciate others. Breakfast at Sally's (2008) was written to chronicle the surprising places in which Richard LeMieux found hope—the quiet dignity and supportive comraderie of those with whom he journeyed through homelessness. May you, friend, find inspiration here, also.

    Biography: How do you survive a fall from what appears to be a "great height?" Richard LeMieux was once known as "the man who had it all" to his friends and associates–-waterfront home, hot tubs, cars and boats, trophy wife, and a good family life with his grown kids. He'd built a fortune as a publisher, when suddenly, everything changed.

    LeMieux’s new life meant subsisting in an old van, getting by, and begging on the streets with his only companion, a small dog named "Willow." The grocery market he'd spent thousands in now wanted him to "move along" and stop asking for help. Homelessness was a massive, late-life change to cope with. And ending it all, by jumping off a bridge, seemed appropriate at the time. But Willow, at least, was there to protest and give him reason to go on. When the woundedness of unanticipated suffering is superceded by identification with the sufferings of others, a painful, beautiful, and marvelous thing begins to take shape. The awakening of a heart to compassion, to what really matters, is a lesson often born in agony.

    LeMieux’s story is chronicled in the touchingly honest and refreshingly humorous Breakfast at Sally's. A former sportswriter, he presents the valiant struggles of the homeless people he befriends with an eye for studied character in the face of difficulty. He finds their genuine comraderie a matter of inspiration, for laughing together at the ironies of life, and for daring to hope. Prepare to be changed yourself.

    Links:


    Michael T. McRay, MPhil

    "A Storied Resistance: Dismantling the Enemy in Palestine and Prison"

    Location: Sullivan 109  
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Michael McRay Author PhotoMichael McRay Book CoverDescription of Presentation: "An enemy is someone whose story we have not yet heard." Enemies are often those we've dehumanized by projecting/believing single, simplified stories. Perpetuating violence depends on the suffocation of human stories. Author, Michael McRay, shares stories from his work with Christian Peacemaker Teams in Palestine and volunteering in maximum security prisons in Nashville. By narrating encounters with Israeli soldiers and Palestinians, murderers and rapists, McRay shows how opening oneself to hearing the stories of “the enemy” is essential to dismantling the whole notion altogether.

    Biography: Michael T. McRay is a teacher, activist, speaker, and the author of Letters from “Apartheid Street”: A Christian Peacemaker in Occupied Palestine (2013) and Where the River Bends: Considering Forgiveness in the Lives of Prisoners (2015), with a foreword by Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu. McRay co-founded No Exceptions Prison Collective (noexceptions.net) and founded, organizes, and co-hosts Tenx9 Nashville (www.tenx9nashville.com), a Belfast-originated monthly community storytelling night, for the sharing of true life stories around a theme. McRay volunteered at Riverbend prison for over four years, serving as a volunteer chaplain for nearly one year, before being banned by the warden in April 2014 for organizing on behalf of the inmates.

    McRay’s eyes have burned from Israeli tear gas and his feet have run from Israeli bullets. He has discussed politics and liberation with Palestinians, nonviolence and terrorism with armed Israeli soldiers. McRay has shared meals and pondered forgiveness with men and women convicted of murder and rape, and studied reconciliation and conflict in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Having traveled to thirty countries, McRay has seen much of the world and still wonders how best to inhabit his place in it. He holds an MPhil (with Distinction) in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation Studies from Trinity College Dublin at Belfast, as well as a BA in History from Lipscomb University. Among other pursuits, McRay currently teaches as an adjunct instructor at Lipscomb in restorative justice, forgiveness and reconciliation, storytelling, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and international conflict resolution.

    Links:


    Peter Mountford, Events Curator at Hugo House

    "Radical Empathy: The Role of Compassion in Our Global Economy" (with Sunil Yapa)

    Location: Sullivan Ct C6
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Peter Mountford Author PhotoPeter Mountford Book CoverDescription of Presentation: We live in a radically new world, one where we practice Buddhism in California, import Texan rice to India, and watch Hollywood movies high in the Andes. Both a traveler to, and an immigrant from, Sunil Yapa will read from his novel, Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist (2016), and discuss with novelist Peter Mountford, a globally-engaged, post-colonial literature writer. How does such work demand greater empathy? Expect a lively discussion, co-sponsored by Hugo House, on how American writers and readers can engage with new globalism.

    Biography: Peter Mountford’s first novel A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism (2011) won the 2012 Washington State Book Award, and was a finalist for the VCU Cabell First Novelist Prize. His second novel The Dismal Science (2014) was a New York Times Editor’s Choice, and was a 2015 finalist for the Washington State Book Award. His work has appeared in Southern Review, Granta, The Atlantic, Best New American Voices 2008, The Sun, Conjunctions, The New York Times, and elsewhere. He is currently on faculty at Sierra Nevada College’s low-residency MFA program, and he is the Events Curator at Hugo House, Seattle’s writing center.

    Photo Credit: Sarah Samudre

    Links:


    Leticia Nieto, PsyD

    "Social Justice Through Interpersonal Liberation: Strategic Interventions for Anti-Oppression"

    Location: Pigott 109  
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Leticia Nieto Author PhotoLeticia Nieto Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Dr. Nieto will invite participants to explore paths to liberation from social conditioning. Her framework includes attention to interpersonal patterns, the impact of social memberships on individuals and relationships, and the role of spiritual practice and transcendence in social change. This workshop will use expressive techniques to involve participants deeply and provide opportunities for enjoyment, perspective shifts, and lasting change. This will be an exploration of the intersection between social analysis, embodiment, and expression.

    Biography: Dr. Leticia Nieto, internationally known author of Beyond Inclusion, Beyond Empowerment: A Developmental Strategy to Liberate Everyone (2010), brings an innovative approach to engaging with hot button issues such as race, gender, and status in order to help students get to deeper structures beneath the surface of stereotypes and socially accepted norms. Nieto is a practicing psychotherapist and trains counselors as a core faculty member of Saint Martin’s University Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology program in Olympia, Washington. She is also a Certified Psychodrama practitioner (CP), and is Artistic Director of Pasajer@s Playback Theatre. Beyond Inclusion, Beyond Empowerment: A Developmental Strategy to Liberate Everyone, is an accessible analysis of the psychological dynamics of oppression and privilege, and offers readers ways to develop skills to promote social justice.

    Links:


    Rev. Dr. Rebecca Ann Parker, DMin

    "The End of God: How Saying No to God Can Be the Beginning of Spiritual Wisdom”

    Location: Sullivan Ct C3
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Rev. Dr. Rebecca Ann Parker Author PhotoRev Dr Rebecca Ann Parker Book CoverDescription of Presentation: What happens in the aftermath of saying “No” to God? Theologian Rebecca Parker proposes that saying "No" to offensive, oppressive, and problematic ideas about God is an act of faith—one that creates a space of emptiness in which a spiritual awakening can occur and a transformed sense of the sacred can arise. In this talk, she will share stories of those who have found that beyond “No” a deeper “Yes” beckoned. New theologies, arising from the “underside,” begin here.

    Biography: Rev. Dr. Rebecca Parker, whose writing has been called “poignant and provocative . . . a blueprint for deeper thinking about the things that matter most” by The New York Times book reviewer Rosemary Bray McNatt, is author and co-author to several ground-breaking books, including A House for Hope: The Promise of Progressive Religion for the Twenty-First Century (2010 with John Buehrens), Proverbs of Ashes (2002 with Rita Nakashima Brock), and Saving Paradise: How Christianity Traded Love of This World for Crucifixion and Empire (2009 with Rita Nakashima Brock), which was named a “Best Religious Book of the Year” by Publishers Weekly. An ordained United Methodist minister in dual standing with The Unitarian Universalist Association, Parker was the first woman to head a theological school in the US and Canada, and is now Emerita Professor and Emerita President of Starr King School for the Ministry, at the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley.

    As a theological educator Parker has advanced educational practices that counter oppressions, cultivate multi-religious understanding, and promote the creation of just and sustainable communities. Currently, she is at work on a new book that explores the theological history of critical de-constructions of God and the emergence of life-giving theological expressions that honor the experiences of women, people of color, LGBTQ people, and the voices of the earth itself. Parker, a native of the Pacific Northwest, lives with her spouse in Virginia, where she is active as a founding trustee of The Braxton Institute for Sustainability, Resiliency, and Joy.

    Links:


    Alexander Pattakos, PhD

    "MEANINGology® and The OPA! Way®" (with Elaine Dundon)

    Location: Sullivan Ct C6
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Alexander Pattakos Author PhotoAlexander Pattakos Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Join Dr. Pattakos and Elaine Dundon as they introduce and discuss their unique concept of MEANINGology®, which is the practical, interdisciplinary study of how to find deeper meaning in our lives, work, and society. Pattakos and Dundon will also share a few lessons from their two best-selling books: The OPA! Way: Finding Joy & Meaning in Everyday Life & Work (2014), which is uniquely inspired by Greek philosophy, mythology, and culture, and Prisoners of Our Thoughts: Viktor Frankl’s Principles for Discovering Meaning in Life and Work (2010).

    Biography: Alex Pattakos, affectionately nicknamed "Dr. Meaning," is co-founder of the Global Meaning Institute, which is a leader in the Meaning Movement through its leading-edge research, education programs, and strategic advising. Pattakos is co-author of The OPA! Way: Finding Joy & Meaning in Everyday Life & Work, an award-winning book and new Meaning paradigm that is uniquely inspired by Greek philosophy, mythology, and culture. Pattakos is also author of the international best-selling book on meaning, Prisoners of Our Thoughts (twenty-two languages), that incorporates the wisdom of Viktor Frankl, who personally urged Pattakos to write it. A pioneer in the personal transformation arena, Pattakos has an extensive background in political science, public administration, psychology, leadership development, systems science, and business.

    Proudly describing himself as a pracademic (i.e., linking practice and theory), he has worked closely with all levels of government, including the White House under three presidents on various public policy matters. He also served as an adviser to the Commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration. A US Army veteran, Pattakos is also a former therapist and mental health administrator, political campaign organizer, and full-time university professor and graduate program head of public and business administration. Pattakos was one of the initial faculty evaluators for the Innovations in American Government Awards Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. He is dedicated to helping others develop their full potential by finding Meaning at work and in everyday life. More information can be found at globalmeaninginstitute.com.

    Links:


    Nancy Pearl, MLS, MA

    "Beyond Either/Or" (with Lesley Hazleton)

    Location: Sullivan Ct C5
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Nancy Pearl Author PhotoNancy Pearl Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Best-selling librarian Nancy Pearl (Book Lust, 2003) and accidental theologist Lesley Hazleton (The First Muslim, 2014) explore the strange and absorbing business of being (and writing) in the world as they preview Hazleton’s new book Agnostic: A Spirited Manifesto (April 2016).

    Biography: Nancy Pearl speaks about the pleasures of reading to libraries, literacy organizations, and community groups throughout the world and comments on books regularly on NPR's Morning Edition. Pearl is the author of Book Lust To Go: Recommended Reading for Travelers, Vagabonds, and Dreamers (2010), Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Reason (2003), More Book Lust: 1,000 New Reading Recommendations for Every Mood, Moment, and Reason (2005), and Book Crush: For Kids and Teens: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Interest (2007). Her most recent project is a series of reprints of 12 of her favorite novels published between 1960 and 2000, called Book Lust Rediscoveries, and a series of reprints of a dozen of her favorite books for kids and teens called Book Crush Rediscoveries. Born and raised in Detroit, Pearl received her library degree (MLS) in 1967 from the University of Michigan. She also received an MA in history from Oklahoma State University in 1977.

    Most recent of her many honors and awards are the 2011 Librarian of the Year Award from Library Journal, the 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association, the 2011 Literary Lions Award from the King County Library System, the 2010 Margaret E. Monroe Award from the Reference and Users Services Association of the American Library Association, “presented to a librarian who has made significant contributions to library adult services,” and the 2004 Women's National Book Association Award, given to "a living American woman who …has done meritorious work in the world of books beyond the duties or responsibilities of her profession or occupation." Pearl was also given the Brava Award from the Seattle Women's University Club, recognizing "women of exceptional ability in the Greater Seattle Area, 2004 Louis Shores Greenwood Publishing Group Award for excellence in the reviewing of books and other material for libraries, and the 2004 Media and Communications Award from the Ontario, Canada, Library Association.

    Links:


    Joelle Pretty, MA

    "Questioning for Purpose: A Workshop on Career & Life Change Discernment" (with Colette Casavant)"

    Location: Pigott 103
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Joelle Pretty Author Pic 2016Description of Presentation: Q4P (Questioning for Purpose) is an interactive discernment workshop for people searching for direction. Participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their passions and sources of energy in their lives. Attendees will utilize journaling and paired discussions to draw out deep longings and inner wisdom.

    Biography: Joelle Pretty is entering her fifth year as Seattle University’s Director of Premajor Studies and Student Academic Persistence, where her work focuses on undergraduate student success and discernment. Pretty holds a Master of Arts in student development administration and is a doctoral student in educational leadership.


    Rev. Dr. Phyllis Ratcliff-Beaumonte, MA, MAPS, DMin

    "Women Advocating for Social Justice and Equality: Seattle Church Women United"

    Location: Sullivan 105
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Rev. Dr. Phyllis Ratcliff-Beaumonte Author PhotoRev. Dr. Phyllis Ratcliff-Beaumonte Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Dr. Beaumonte's passion for advocacy against racism and classism led her to join Seattle Church Women United (CWU), a unit of the National ecumenical movement, which is built on the principle of unity across racial, cultural, and theological lines. The unexplained demise of the Seattle unit inspired her to research and discover why.

    Biography: Phyllis Beaumonte was born in Seattle, Washington, and is a graduate of Garfield High School. Many years later, she received a BA in Political Science and Editorial Journalism (double major) and an MA in Public Administration from the University of Washington. Much of Beaumonte's mid-life was dedicated to teaching high school students for over twenty years, and she specialized in American Government and the Constitution. She also served as a part-time instructor at South Community College, and a lecturer at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington. Beaumonte is licensed to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ and was ordained at the National Baptist Women's Ministers' Conference in Berkeley, California. She received an MA in Pastoral Studies, a Certificate in Pastoral Leadership from Seattle University's School of Theology and Ministry, and a Doctor of Ministry from San Francisco Theological Seminary in San Anselmo, California.

    Dedicated to social justice and the social gospel, Beaumonte has served as Chairperson of Religious Affairs, and Vice-President and Education Chairperson for both the Seattle-King County and States of Alaska, Oregon, and Washington National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). She has been the former president of the Black Heritage Society of Washington State, former president of the Board of the Central Area Senior Center, board president and board member of the Church Council of Greater Seattle, as well as the former president of both Seattle Church Women United and Washington and Northern Idaho CWU. Beaumonte has received numerous awards for her poem "Take Jesus on Your Journey" as well as her publication entitled "Poetry and Prose", which includes an analysis of stereotyping and the media. Beaumonte received the Daisy Bates "Excellence in Education Award" from the National NAACP and numerous other awards from national and local community based organizations. Beaumonte is included in Who's Who in American Education and Who's Who of American Women.


    Zeki Saritoprak, PhD

    (This author is presenting at two separate sessions during the Festival)

    "Jesus in Islam"

    Location: Sullivan 110
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Zeki Saritoprak Author PhotoZeki Saritoprak Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Few people realize that Jesus was a prominent messenger of God in Islam and that Muslims believe in the return of Jesus. Professor Saritoprak will take a bold yet candid look at the highly charged topic of Jesus' place in Islam, exploring some of the religion's least understood aspects. Actively engaged in efforts to promote interfaith dialogue and harmony, Saritoprak thoughtfully argues that the shared belief in Jesus presents an excellent opportunity for understanding between Muslims and Christians.

    “Who Was Jesus of Nazareth?: Abrahamic Panel Discussion” (with Sr. Mary C. Boys and Rabbi Daniel A. Weiner)

    Location: Pigott 104-Auditorium
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Description of Presentation: Jesus of Nazareth has been one of the more enduring personalities of human history. However, people have had very different understandings about who he was, what he accomplished and the ultimate significance he has had on the human race. At different times, he has also been used to justify behaviors that contradict the very essence of his life and teachings. This fascinating panel will look at the Jesus of history through three very different prisms—Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The panel presenters will include an influential Muslim scholar, with a new book entitled Islam’s Jesus, a famous American Catholic religious woman and theologian; and, a highly-respected rabbi with deep influence in the Pacific Northwest and the nation. Come and find out just how complicated of a person Jesus of Nazareth really is ....

    Biography: Zeki Saritoprak has held the Nursi Chair in Islamic Studies at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, since 2003. He holds a PhD in Islamic Theology from the University of Marmara in Turkey. His dissertation which examines the personification of evil in the Islamic tradition is entitled The Antichrist (al-Dajjal) in Islamic Theology and was published in Turkish in Istanbul in 1992. Prior to coming to John Carroll, Professor Saritoprak held positions at Harran University in Turkey, Georgetown University, the Catholic University of America, and Berry College in Rome, Georgia. Saritoprak is also the founder and former president of the Rumi Forum for Interfaith Dialogue in Washington, DC. Saritoprak is the author of over thirty academic articles and encyclopedia entries on topics in Islam. He has served as guest editor for issues of the journals Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations and Muslim World. He is editor and co-translator of Fundamentals of Rumi’s Thought: A Mevlevi Sufi Perspective (in English, 2004) and the editor of a critical edition of al-Sarakhsi’s Sifat Ashrat al-Sa’a (in Arabic,1993). His most recent book Islam’s Jesus was published by the University Press of Florida in 2014. He is currently preparing a book on Islamic spirituality tentatively titled Islamic Spirituality: Theology and Practice for the Modern World.

    Links:


    Fr. Antonio Spadaro, STD

    "Pope Francis and the Internet Culture"

    Location: Pigott 104-Auditorium
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Fr Antonio Spadaro Author PhotoFr Antonio Spadaro Book CoverDescription of Presentation: In April 2009, a few months before being arrested for the second time, Chinese human rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo wrote: "the Internet is a gift from God.” Five years later, in Pope Francis' Message for World Communications Day 2014, he reiterated the Chinese dissident's words by saying, "the Internet can offer a better possibility of encounter and solidarity amongst everyone, and this is something good; it is a gift from God." What is Pope Francis' relationship with Internet culture and language?

    Biography: Fr. Antonio Spadaro, a Jesuit, is the editor of La Civiltá Cattolica magazine, which was founded in 1850. In 2011, he was named by Benedict XVI as a consultant to the Pontifical Council for Culture and the Pontifical Council for Social Communication. Spadaro conducted the first interview of Pope Francis, My Door is Always Open (2013), and also appeared in twenty magazines and journals run by the Jesuits throughout the world. Spadaro also edited the English edition of the morning homilies of Pope Francis from St. Martha's Chapel, Encountering Truth: Meeting God in the Everyday (2015). One of Spadaro’s areas of expertise is the languages of contemporary culture. He dedicated more than a decade to the study of digital culture from an anthropological and theological perspective. Spadaro teaches "Cybertheology" at the Theology Faculty of the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. He is the author of twenty-five books, including Web 2.0. Relationship in the Internet Age (Paulines, 2010), and Cybertheology: Thinking Christianity in the Era of the Internet (Fordham University Press, 2014). His twitter account is @antoniospadaro.

    Links:


    Dr. Laura Stivers, PhD

    “Disrupting Homelessness: From Charity to Community”

    Location: Sullivan 105
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Dr Laura Stivers Author PhotoDr Laura Stivers Book CoverDescription of Presentation: How can religious organizations address homelessness in ways that promote hospitality and justice? Often our compassionate and well-meaning responses to homelessness are based on dominant ideologies that are not empowering for those we serve, and confined to charity that does not challenge societal oppression and inequality. In this presentation, Dr. Laura Stivers will share highlights from her book Disrupting Homelessness: Alternative Christian Approaches (2011) and engage participants in conversation about the ideologies we assume and ways that we might approach homelessness differently.

    Biography: Laura Stivers is Dean of the School of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and a Professor of Social Ethics at Dominican University of California. Stivers received her PhD from the Graduate Theological Union, her MDiv from Pacific School of Religion, and her BA from Saint Olaf College. Stivers is the author of Disrupting Homelessness: Alternative Christian Approaches, Co-author of Earth Ethics: A Case Method Approach (2015) and Christian Ethics: A Case Method Approach (2012), and Co-editor of Justice in a Global Economy: Strategies for Home, Community, and World (2006). Stivers serves on the Board of the Society of Christian Ethics and was a past President of the Southeast Commission for the Study of Religion.

    Stivers is on the leadership team of the Marin Interfaith Street Chaplaincy, has worked with nonprofits organizing for affordable housing, and volunteers with a local shelter program run by multiple religious organizations. Most recently Stivers has been involved with local community groups to promote civic dialogue on the issues of development, especially in relation to housing and transportation. Her writing this year is focused on climate change, smart growth, and racial justice. In addition to her academic and justice work, Stivers raises two creative daughters, swims daily at the crack of dawn, and seeks outdoor adventures whenever possible.

    Links:


    Damon Tweedy, MD

    "Reflections on Race and Medicine"

    Location: Pigott 104-Auditorium
    Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Damon Tweedy Author PhotoDamon Tweedy Book CoverDescription of Presentation: When Damon Tweedy began medical school he envisioned a bright future where his segregated, working class background, would become largely irrelevant. Instead, he found that he had joined a new world where race was front and center. In his recent book, Black Man in a White Coat (2015), Tweedy explores the challenges confronting black doctors, and the disproportionate health burdens faced by black patients. He is ultimately seeking a way forward to better treatment and more compassionate care.

    Biography: Damon Tweedy is a graduate of Duke Medical School and Yale Law School. He is an assistant professor of psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center and staff physician at the Durham VA Medical Center. Tweedy has published articles about race and medicine in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and the Annals of Internal Medicine. His columns and op-eds have appeared in The New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, the Raleigh News & Observer, and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Black Man in a White Coat is his first book.

    Links:


    Professor Eugene Webb, PhD

    "In Search of the Triune God: The Christian Paths of East and West"

    Location: Pigott 105
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Eugene Webb Author PhotoEugene Webb Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Eugene Webb’s book traces the ways in which Eastern and Western Christianity diverged over three differences: one, the difference between an experiential approach to interpreting the Biblical symbols of Father, Son, and Spirit; two, over the ways they explicate and raise into consciousness the structure of the Christian experience of life in Christ; three, over the speculative approach that assumes they refer to three “somethings” in God that cannot be known by experience but must be believed on the basis of authority.

    Biography: Eugene Webb is Professor Emeritus in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. Before his retirement he was Professor of Comparative Religion and Comparative Literature, as well as Associate Director of the Jackson School where he founded and chaired both the Comparative Religion Program (in 1974) and the European Studies Program (in 1994). Webb is the author of eight books, the most recent of which are World View and Mind: Religious Thought and Psychological Development (2009) and In Search of the Triune God: The Christian Paths of East and West (2014).

    Links:


    Daniel A. Weiner, Senior Rabbi, Temple De Hirsch Sinai

    “Who Was Jesus of Nazareth?: Abrahamic Panel Discussion” (with Sr. Mary C. Boys and Zeki Saritoprak)

    Location: Pigott 104-Auditorium
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

     Daniel Weiner Author Photo  Rabbi Daniel Weiner Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Jesus of Nazareth has been one of the more enduring personalities of human history. However, people have had very different understandings about who he was, what he accomplished and the ultimate significance he has had on the human race. At different times, he has also been used to justify behaviors that contradict the very essence of his life and teachings. This fascinating panel will look at the Jesus of history through three very different prisms—Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The panel presenters will include an influential Muslim scholar, with a new book entitled Islam’s Jesus, a famous American Catholic religious woman and theologian; and, a highly-respected rabbi with deep influence in the Pacific Northwest and the nation. Come and find out just how complicated of a person Jesus of Nazareth really is....

    Biography: Senior Rabbi Daniel Weiner believes passionately in building Judaism for the 21st century and in healing the world through social justice. Temple De Hirsch Sinai has grown to more than 4,000 members and 1,500 families in two campuses in Seattle and Bellevue since he took charge in 2001.His innovations in worship include producing “rabcasts” on video, bringing services to travelers and shut-ins on the internet and leading a rock band in popular Rock Shabbat services. He tweets @rocknrabbidanny.

    Weiner and his team just won the Religion Action Center’s Fain Award for their campaign on gun responsibility. Rabbi Weiner is a founding member of the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility, which drafted and helped pass Initiative 594 in 2014.Work on implementation of the law and about gun responsibility continues.

    His columns have appeared in The Seattle Times and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Weiner wrote “Good God: Faith for the Rest of Us” about the dangerous polarization between fanatical faith and soulless secularism.

    Weiner is married to Cindy Tepper Weiner of Baltimore. They are the proud parents of Julia and Benjamin. He frequently enjoys the glorious climes of the Pacific Northwest while walking their black lab, Sadie.

    Links:


    Sunil Yapa

    "Radical Empathy: The Role of Compassion in Our Global Economy" (co-production with Hugo House, Peter Mountford)

    Location: Sullivan Ct C6
    Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm

    Sunil Yapa Author PhotoSunil Yapa Book CoverDescription of Presentation: We live in a radically new world, one where we practice Buddhism in California, import Texan rice to India, and watch Hollywood movies high in the Andes. Both a traveler to, and an immigrant from, Sunil Yapa will read from his novel, Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist (2016), and discuss with novelist Peter Mountford, a globally-engaged, post-colonial literature writer. How does such work demand greater empathy? Expect a lively discussion, co-sponsored by Hugo House, on how American writers and readers can engage with new globalism.

    Biography: Sunil Yapa holds a BA in economic geography from Penn State Universtiy and an MFA from Hunter College. The biracial son of a Sri Lanken father and a mother from Montana, Yapa has lived around the world, including Greece, Guatemala, Chile, Argentina, China, and India, as well as London, Montreal, and New York City.

    Photo Credit: Gilbert Chong

    Links:


    Ron Young

    "Crossing Boundaries: Fifty Years Working for Justice and Peace. A Reading and Discussion"

    Location: Pigott 101
    Time: 9:00am-10:00am

    Ron Young Author PhotoRon Young Book CoverDescription of Presentation: Crossing Boundaries in the Americas, Vietnam and the Middle East (2014) is Ron Young's personal, yet profoundly political, first person account of his unique interracial and interfaith leadership roles over five decades in movements for civil rights, against the Vietnam War, and for Arab-Israeli Palestinian peace. Young’s story, told with honesty, humility, and humor, gives an insider view of key events in these movements and personalizes a significant strain of modern American history not often afforded sufficient attention in either textbooks or the mainstream media. Young’s book is an important read for anyone interested in these issues and movements, and should be recommended reading for students in colleges and high schools.

    Biography: Ron Young serves as Consultant to thirty national Jewish, Christian, and Muslim religious leaders, working together for Israeli-Palestinian peace. In the 1980's, Young and his wife, Carol Jensen, lived in the Middle East while pursuing a Quaker assignment of listening to Arabs and Israelis about opportunities and obstacles to peace, and what the US could do to help. Young has led a dozen interfaith trips to Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza, Egypt, Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon. He's arranged meetings for interfaith delegations of religious leaders with four Secretaries of State and with key members of Congress to advocate for US policies that could help achieve peace.

    In 1980, as National Peace Education Secretary of the American Friends Service Committee, Young participated in an ecumenical delegation mission to El Salvador and met with Archbishop Romero a day before he was assassinated. During the Vietnam War, as National Youth Secretary of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, Young resisted the draft, led an interfaith/interracial mission to expose repression in Saigon, carried mail to American POW's in Hanoi, and coordinated national peace marches on Washington, DC in November 1969 and May 1970. In the 1960's, Young worked as Youth Associate to Reverend James Lawson at a Black Methodist church in Memphis, and marched with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Selma.

    Links: