Perspectives

Breaking Barriers

Maia Schumacher
Building a simple paper pyramid at Washington Middle School sounds like an unassuming art project, yet Maia Schumacher sees something much more. This Seattle University sophomore from Tacoma describes how constructing small pyramids in the school art room opens the door to fruitful conversations about learning disabilities among middle schoolers. Unlike other school subjects, she says, art doesn’t have quite the same rules and barriers to learning. Read more about "Breaking Barriers".

Politics Aside

Eric Sype listing
Eric Sype, ’15, had a sixth grade teacher in his hometown of Cashmere, Wash., with a knack for spotting a promising leader, one who was ready to step into the limelight of public service. He nudged Sype to become class president. That teacher was onto something. Soon, Sype ran for class offices and became president of the student body, first at his middle school, then in his high school of 450. A natural leader was born. Read more about "Politics Aside".

Living the Dream

Michael Hart
It’s no secret that Seattle University produces some amazing individuals, who excel academically as students and achieve success post-graduation in careers as varied and multidimensional as their backgrounds and majors. We asked some how they got to where they are. We found fate and serendipity, ambition and drive all played roles. There’s the financial manager who does wonders managing wealth and a side career as a magician. And there’s a baker who has found sweet success with her sweet treats and a NASA atmospheric physicist who knows what’s really causing harm to the ozone layer. Read more about "Living the Dream".

Rhodes to Success

Ryan Sawyer listing
Men’s Soccer Coach Pete Fewing had an eye for talent when he chose Ryan Sawyer, ’94, to play for Seattle University. Here’s how it went down. Sawyer grew up in Boise, Idaho, and knew a big-city school with the added benefit of soccer would be in his future. He piqued Fewing’s interest with a four-minute video of some of his best plays. “We took a nighttime tour of campus, running from Connolly Center through the campus before heading to Tacoma where he was playing in a soccer game,” Sawyer recalls. “After the game, he wanted me to knock the ball around to see if I really could play.” Read more about "Rhodes to Success".

Now Reporting...Redhawk Rob

Redhawk Rob
If you haven’t yet met up with Redhawk Rob, give him a Google. You’re about to discover one of Seattle University’s most interesting characters, a campus comic whose offbeat videos continue to attract new devotees, from prospective students to members of the executive leadership. James Cashman, '15, is the man behind Redhawk Rob and the “Robert Report.” Read more about "Now Reporting...Redhawk Rob".

Investing in Our Youth and in the Future

SUYI computer lab
The Seattle University Youth Initiative is the university’s largest-ever community engagement project focused on improving academic achievement for youth in the square-mile neighborhood that includes Bailey Gatzert Elementary School. Gatzert is the first focal point of the Youth Initiative, which also encompasses Washington Middle School and Garfield High School.

 Read more about "Investing in Our Youth and in the Future".

A Calling to Make a Difference

Verle Bleese
Asked why he decided to make a $1 million bequest to the School of Theology and Ministry, Seattle man Verle Bleese has a simple answer. “Because I wanted to," he says. “No light came on, I did not have a vision. It was just a feeling that I was doing something that will make a difference for good in this world.” Read more about "A Calling to Make a Difference".

Hey Mr. DJ

popko
On its website, Seattle University’s student radio station KSUB-89.1 FM makes the bold claim to “sonically kick your teeth in” with “pirates riding waves of sound” who are “rebels in a music revolution.” Enter Seattle University Librarian John Popko, known on the KSUB airwaves as Nigel, Your Favorite Child of the Sixties, host of The Finn Hill Sessions. This volunteer DJ might be a rebel who carries a briefcase, yet his keen memory for music is not unlike an online database you might find in a university library. Read more about "Hey Mr. DJ".

Reaching New Heights

ursino selfie
When Mark Ursino hit his mid-30s—or as he dubs the time, “looking at the wrong side of 35”—he decided he was going to do something he’d never done before. Career change? Nope. Buy a fancy sports car? No, not that. Ursino opted to take up the challenge put forth by his longtime friend Don who, since the two were in high school, prodded him to climb Mount Rainier. Read more about "Reaching New Heights".

The Sacred in the Everyday

bill watson
It’s no small task when you decide to amplify St. Ignatius Loyola’s 16th century examination of conscience to make it inviting, relevant and meaningful to a contemporary lay audience. Since the early 1990s, William Watson, S.J., has been on that winding path. Motivated by a daily spiritual discipline that proved therapeutic in his own life, Father Watson chose to devote his energies to bringing tools for discernment and reflection to a wider audience. Read more about "The Sacred in the Everyday".

Whistling Isn't Work—It's Art

whistler
The noisy, bustling International District/Chinatown transit station might not be every performing artist’s idea of a dream concert hall. Campbell Thibo isn’t just any artist, though. The station’s amazing echo and Asian garden aesthetic are what appeal to the Fine Arts graduate student’s desire to touch something deeper in his audience. He considers the transit platform an underutilized performance venue. If only he could eliminate the ever-present, deafening roar of all those buses and trains, Thibo imagines the transit tunnel would be perfection for the joys of his whistling. That’s right. Whistling. Read more about "Whistling Isn't Work—It's Art".

The Making of Champions

Coach Joan
On the day of a press conference introducing Joan Bonvicini as the new head coach of women’s basketball, the coach—who is known by players as “Coach B”—announced that she was a championship coach at a championship university and that she was at Seattle University to build a championship program. That last point is one that Coach B is proving since taking over the program in 2009. When a team achieves success, some people lean back, but Bonvicini is always working to get better. Read more about "The Making of Champions".