HR Policy Manual

Foreword

The University's Human Resources Philosophy

The University's Strategic Plan for 2000 - 2010 emphasizes a commitment to excellence in all aspects of the University's operations. This focus on excellence includes a culture that encourages and supports service and professionalism in the interactions of employees with each other, with students and their families, and with members of the public. All employees are viewed as representatives of the University who have the opportunity to model service and professionalism in their many interactions both internally and externally.

The University desires to maintain a competent, stable, and diverse work force that is well informed in matters affecting employment. The University also seeks to promote employees' opportunity for growth, expression of ideas, and work satisfaction through an atmosphere of appreciation and recognition of their contributions. Excellence in the provision of all services is an essential component of a distinctive education at the University. Therefore, the University strives to develop and maintain the positive work environment needed to recruit and retain capable, committed, and caring employees.

Equal Employment Opportunity

The University provides equal employment opportunities to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, political ideology, or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, including, but not limited to, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfers, leaves of absence, compensation, benefits, and training.

The University administers all policies, practices, and procedures in ways that are consistent with the University's Catholic and Jesuit character.

For additional policy information, see Section 13.

Nature of Employment

All staff, non-tenured faculty, and nontenure-track faculty are employed "at will." This means those individuals may decide to end their employment with the University at any time for any reason or no reason, and the University has the right to terminate the employment of those individuals at any time for any reason or no reason.

HR Policy Manual Application and Amendment

This Manual does not create a contract, and the University reserves the right to modify any provisions in the Manual, or to discontinue all or a part of this Manual, at any time. This Manual and any amendments, deletions, or additions, are effective on the day posted to this website (http://www.seattleu.edu/hr), unless expressly stated otherwise in the posting.

Resources

Equal Employment Opportunity: http://www.eeolaw.com

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

1. Hours

1.1 Hours of Operation

The standard business hours of the University offices are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Individual departments may operate on alternative schedules based on the nature of the particular services they provide. For an employee to alter the standard workweek schedule, advance approval by his supervisor is required.

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1.2 Meal Period

The University affords staff members one (1) unpaid hour for lunch, which is scheduled by the department supervisor. No employee shall be required to work more than five (5) consecutive hours without a meal period.

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1.3 Rest Periods

The University affords a fifteen (15) minute break for every four (4) continuous hours of work. Time not taken as a rest period cannot be used to shorten the workday, accrue compensatory time, or be added to the meal period.

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1.4 Reporting Absence From Work

Regular and reliable attendance at work is an essential requirement of employment at the University. Employees are expected to notify their supervisor within thirty (30) minutes of their start time if they are to be absent from work (see Sections 4.2 and 4.3 for time reporting procedures). An employee who fails to report to work for three (3) consecutive days without notifying her supervisor may be considered to have voluntarily resigned employment with the University. Because frequent absences undermine performance and compromise the University's service standards, employees with frequent absences may be placed on a corrective action plan. Employees are expected to notify their supervisor as soon as possible if they are going to be late.

Planned absences are to be scheduled in advance and in coordination with the supervisor.  Approval of vacation scheduling is based on the needs of the department.

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Resources

Fair Labor Standards Act: http://www.dol.gov/dol/compliance/comp-flsa.htm

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

2. Definition of Employee Groups

2.1. Regular Employees - Benefits Eligible

"Regular" employees are in budgeted, staff positions and may be either full-time or part-time. Full-time means 1.0 "full-time equivalent" (FTE). Part-time means .53 FTE (or greater) for staff and administrators and .50 FTE (or greater) for faculty and those employees on a 40-hour work week. Regular employees are eligible for benefits. The following employee groups are regular employees.

A. Exempt Staff

"Exempt" staff are executive, administrative, or professional employees of the University as defined by the Fair Labor Standards Act and are exempt from state and federal minimum wage and overtime pay requirements. Exempt staff are paid on a salary basis for work performed and are not eligible for paid overtime.

B. Non-exempt Staff

"Non-exempt" staff are employees of the University as defined by the state and federal law and are not exempt from the minimum wage and overtime requirements. Non-exempt staff are paid an hourly wage for work performed and are eligible for paid overtime.

For additional information about the Fair Labor Standards Act visit http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/wages/index.htm.

C. Faculty Status

Some exempt employees may hold faculty rank and also serve in exempt, administrative non-faculty positions. Those employees are subject to all terms and conditions applicable to exempt non-faculty employees. In addition, these individuals may have certain rights, through tenure, to continued employment as a faculty member. Those rights affect only the individual's status as a faculty member.

D. Union

Union employees are those University employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement.

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2.2 Employees Not Eligible for Benefits

The following employee groups are not eligible for benefits.

A. Occasional Employees

"Occasional" employees work:

  1. Intermittently and less than 1040 hours per year; or
  2. On a part-time basis less than twenty (20) hours per week.

B. Temporary Employees

"Temporary" employees are hired on a temporary basis for a specific period of time (e.g., for projects or interim assignments). The employment period usually does not exceed three (3) months (ninety (90) calendar days).

C. On-Call Employees

"On-call" employees work an uncertain schedule usually on an irregular or on-call basis. On-call employees are paid an hourly wage.

D. Student Employees

Student employees are hired through the Student Financial Services Office or the School of Law Financial Aid Office in accordance with the policies and procedures of those offices. Student employees are paid through the payroll system as a student employee and are compensated on an hourly basis.

E. Consultants and Independent Contractors

The University also engages the services of consultants and independent contractors (non-employees) on a short-term, temporary, or part-time basis. A consultant or independent contractor is not an employee. The IRS has strict criteria for determining whether an individual is an independent contractor or an employee. Unless otherwise approved by a vice president, contact the HR office before entering into a contract with a consultant.

F. Volunteers

Volunteers are welcome at the University and provide valuable services. A volunteer agreement is required and a record of volunteer hours must be maintained and reported to payroll for liability insurance purposes.

Seattle University employees may volunteer or otherwise perform services for the University on an unpaid basis if all the conditions listed below are met.

  1. There is no expectation of pay;
  2. The volunteer activity is at the employee's own initiative;
  3. The volunteer activity is during the employee's own time (not during regular work hours); and
  4. The duties performed as a volunteer are not similar or identical to the employees regular job duties and responsibilities.

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2.3 Active Employees

"Active" employees are working on regularly assigned or scheduled days.

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Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

3. Recruitment and Appointment

Hiring Manager's Guide: Recruitment and Interviewing Guidelines

Seattle University follows recruiting policies and procedures consistent with its commitment to diversity and its position as an equal opportunity employer. Openings are publicized through on and off-campus postings and advertising.

3.1 Personnel Requisition Process

When a new or existing position opens, the hiring manager will create an online personnel requisition using the SUPER System at https://jobs.seattleu.edu/hr. A user account needs to be set up and approved at this website prior to creating a requisition. The online system facilitates electronic approvals of the area Vice President or Provost and the Associate Vice President for Finance, as applicable. The approvals and position details are then submitted electronically to the Human Resources Office (HR) for posting. Prior to posting, HR will review the position to ensure proper classification.The hiring manager should consult Human Resources for advice on establishing the position before completing a requisition under the following circumstances:

  1. if the position is new (not replacing an incumbent);
  2. if the structure of the organization has changed; or,
  3. if the duties and/or the qualifications of the position have changed significantly.

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3.2 Employee Recruitment and Advertising

HR works with the hiring manager to prepare advertising and coordinate recruitment efforts in appropriate media, such as newspapers, professional journals, websites, and regional and/or national agencies. HR pays for the cost of the advertising. It is the practice of the University to post non-faculty positions for at least seven calendar days before hiring a candidate to fill the position.

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3.3 Applications/Resumes

HR receives all applications and supporting documents via the SUPER System. No application materials are accepted via other methods. For most positions, HR reviews all applications and resumes and evaluates them to assure the minimum qualifications are met as specified in the position announcement. HR releases all applications meeting required qualifications to the hiring manager for consideration.

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3.4 Promotion and Transfer

All interested employees who meet a position's minimum qualifications are encouraged to apply. Selection is based on department needs and candidates' qualifications and performance. The University fills all job vacancies with the individual it deems most qualified for the position, and reserves the right to select candidates from outside the University.

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3.5 Interviews

The hiring manager or his designee selects those to be interviewed from the pool of qualified applicants and should use a consistent set of interview questions for all candidates. Please refer to the Hiring Manager's Guide for guidelines in recruiting and interviewing for a position.

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3.6 Search Committees

A hiring manager or her designee may choose to form a search committee to help in the selection process for professional and managerial level jobs. The membership of the search committee generally will consist of five to seven people who can provide appropriate input for the level and nature of the position. Positions in Bands C1-C4 may or may not require a search committee to be appointed. Search committees are usually appointed for openings in Pay Band levels D and E. A member of the HR staff may act as advisor to the hiring manager or the chairperson of the search committee to insure compliance with University policies and procedures.

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3.7 Employment and Reference Checks

The hiring manager or his designee will check the employment history and references of the final candidate(s) under consideration.

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3.8 Background Checks

Prior to hire, criminal history background checks are conducted on candidates for all staff positions, including temporary employees and Athletics Department volunteers. Conditional job offers may be made before a background check is returned with approval from HR. Persons applying to any staff position must complete a criminal history background check authorization form. A third-party vendor on contract with the university conducts all criminal history background checks. Candidates have the right to request a copy of their background check results from this vendor.

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3.9 Pre-Employment Tests

Any pre-employment screening tests will comply with legal standards for job-relatedness, statistical reliability and validity. All tests must be approved by the Associate Vice President of Human Resources and Equal Opportunity Officer.

Certain positions, including all administrative assistant positions, require candidates to complete a pre-employment computer skills assessment. Computer skills assessment results will be used as an indicator of a person's ability to meet job qualifications. Human Resources may discuss test results with the hiring manager.

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3.10 Salary Setting/Extending a Job Offer

The hiring manager must consult with Human Resources after the search has been completed but before an offer is made to ensure adherence to applicable University policies, salary practices and federal laws. HR coordinates the job offer with the hiring manager or his designee, arranges a start date, and presents an overview of benefits and other related employment items. HR advises the hiring manager or his designee of the appropriate pay for the selected candidate. The salary HR proposes will take into account the candidate's skills and qualifications and will reflect the external market and internal relationships, as well as the budgeted salary dollars for the position.

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3.11 Relocation Expenses

Staff relocation expenses are coordinated and funded through the Human Resources Office. Relocation reimbursement benefits are limited to positions in pay bands C-4, D and E. Actual expenses will be reimbursed up to 10% of salary, not to exceed $5,000.

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3.12 New Hire Paperwork and Completion of Immigration Certification I-9

A new employee should report to his department the on the first day of employment. The Hiring Manager and HR will schedule a time for the new employee to fill out required paperwork on his first day and make arrangements for him to attend the Human Resources and Benefits Orientation session for new employees.

At the commencement of employment, all new employees must document their identity and employment authorization in accordance with the immigration laws of the United States.

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3.13 Process for Hiring Temporary Staff Members

Temporary employees may be engaged to work with the University either through a Temporary Staffing Agency or by entering into a Short-Term Temporary Employment Agreement with the University directly.

Temporary Staffing Agency: HR serves as the SU liaison with the Staffing Agency and coordinates temporary assignments and billing. Hiring managers should contact HR to hire from a temporary agency.

Temporary Employee Direct-Hire: HR will work with the hiring manager to identify candidates for temporary positions, which may include advertising. Sections 3.7, 3.8, 3.10 and 3.12 apply to direct-hire temporary employees. All offers of employment to temporary staff members must be confirmed in writing, using a Letter of Agreement form, available on Human Resource's InSite website at https://insite.seattleu.edu/hr/forms/sharedocuments2/a-Hiring Process/temp_loa_directions.asp.

Hiring managers wanting to hire a specific person for a temporary position should contact HR.

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Resources

Hiring Manager's Guide: Recruitment and Interviewing Guidelines
Immigration Certification I-9: http://www.usda.gov/oce/oce/labor-affairs/i9nutshell.htm

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Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

4. Compensation Policies

4.1 Work Week Definition

A workweek is 12:00 a.m. Sunday through 11:59 p.m. Saturday.

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4.2 Pay Period and Time Reporting for Exempt Employees

Exempt employees report absences such as sick leave, vacation, or other absences, including time without pay on an exception basis to their department head or area Vice President. The department head or area Vice President verifies and signs the time report and forwards it to the Payroll Office in accordance with the procedure the Payroll Office establishes from time to time.

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4.3 Pay Period and Time Sheets for Non-exempt Employees

To ensure compliance with applicable laws, non-exempt employees must keep a record of all hours worked and any sick leave, vacation, or other absences, including time without pay. Non-exempt employees are paid once a month (except those on a forty (40) hour work week, those in collective bargaining units and temporary employees who are paid twice a month). Both the employee and her supervisor sign the time sheet, which is then submitted to the Payroll Office. The Payroll Office determines the days of the month on which the time sheets are due.

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4.4 Payroll Advances

Employees with financial hardship, or whose paycheck would be issued during a scheduled vacation, can occasionally request an advance on their paycheck. The employee is eligible to request an advance equal only to the actual number of days worked in the current pay period. Payroll advances are limited to two times per year. Forms are available in HR.

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4.5 Overtime Pay

Overtime pay is applicable only to non-exempt employees. A full-time non-exempt employee normally works thirty-seven and a half (37.5) hours per week (seven and a half (7.5) hours per day). In accordance with the requirements of federal and state wage and hour laws, non-exempt employees are paid one and a half (1.5) times the regular hourly rate for hours actually worked in excess of forty (40) hours per work week (straight time is given for the hours beyond thirty-seven and a half (37.5) and up forty (40) hours).

The supervisor determines the need for extra hours or overtime. The supervisor must authorize overtime and/or changes to an employee's regular schedule in advance and in writing. Questions about overtime guidelines should be directed to HR.

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4.6 Employee Compensatory Time

Compensatory time applies only to non-exempt employees. An employee may request of his supervisor, in writing, compensatory time off for the hours an employee works in excess of their normal work week. For employees working a 37.5-hour work week, compensatory time is calculated at the employee's normal hourly rate from 37.5 to 40 hours and one and a half (1.5) times the hourly rate for the number of hours worked that exceed 40 hours. For employees working a 40 hour work week, all hours in excess of 40 will be calculated at one and a half (1.5) times the employee's hourly rate. Employees cannot be required to take compensatory time in lieu of being paid for hours exceeding their normal work week. Compensatory time cannot be carried forward or accumulated beyond the pay period in which the overtime was worked.

4.7 Holiday Premium

Holiday premium pay is applicable only to non-exempt employees. Holidays are rarely worked at the University with the exception of essential services. Any non-exempt employee accepting a request to work on an observed holiday receives a holiday premium. There are two options for the holiday premium: (1) an employee may receive premium pay at one and a half (1.5) times the regular hourly rate for working a holiday and, therefore, may not receive a paid day off on another day; or (2) the employee may be paid straight time for the holiday worked and receive a paid day off on another day within that fiscal year as pre-arranged and pre-approved with the supervisor.

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4.8 Classifying New Positions

Once there is budget approval for a new position, HR works with the department head or his designee to determine the appropriate job classification and job title.

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4.9 Job Classification

Positions at the University are assigned to job classifications based on scope of responsibilities, market comparability, and other significant job factors. Job responsibilities and other job factors are described in the position description. The University maintains written position descriptions that are periodically updated as duties and responsibilities change. The position descriptions are available for review on a request basis.

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4.10 Reclassifying Existing Staff Positions

If an employee's job responsibilities have increased or decreased significantly, HR will work with the department head or her designee to determine whether a reclassification is warranted and, if so, the appropriate new classification. Requests for classification review are submitted by the department head to the area Vice President or Provost and then to HR.

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4.11 Reclassification/Rate of Compensation

If an existing staff position is reclassified, the HR will inform affected employees of any changes in the rate or method of compensation.

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Resources

Overtime Pay - Federal and State Wage and Hour Laws: http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/wages/overtimepay.htm

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The University offers the following benefits on a pre-tax basis:  

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

5. General Benefits

 

Introduction

This section of the policy manual is a brief overview of general benefits the University provides for certain of its employees without mandate from any governmental agency. Specific provisions of each plan are governed by an official benefit plan document or insurance policy. If there is a conflict between the plan document/insurance policy and this manual, information in the official document/policy supersedes information in this manual. Plan summaries are available in the Compensation/Benefits section of the University’s Human Resources website at: Compensation and Benefits

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5.1 Eligibility for Benefits

Employees are eligible for benefits as described at Section 2.1. and below. The groups of individuals listed in Section 2.2 are not eligible.

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5.2 University Insurance Programs

   A. FlexPlan - Section 125 Plan
 The University's FlexPlan allows employees to pay for most of their dependents' health premiums on a pre-tax basis.   The FlexPlan qualifies as a Section 125 plan under federal regulations. As such, the FlexPlan is subject to restrictions on eligibility for pre-tax benefits as well as changes to benefit elections that may be made during the year. For example, eligible employees may enroll in a benefits plan on the first day of the first full month of employment or during the University's annual open enrollment period. Enrollment in the Long-Term Disability Plan occurs automatically after 12 continuous months of benefits eligible employment.

 The University offers the following benefits on a pre-tax basis: 

  1. Health Care Benefits (medical, dental, vision, prescription drug, and mental health coverage)
  2. Healthcare spending accounts, dependent care spending accounts

 The following benefits are subject to withholding of taxes on premiums:

  1. Long-Term Disability Insurance
  2. Supplemental or Dependent Life and Accidental Death and Dismemberment Insurance

B. Health and Dependent Care Spending Account  

 Under the healthcare and dependent care spending account programs, employees estimate the amount of eligible health care and/or dependent care expenses they will incur during a calendar year, January through December, and authorize a monthly payroll deduction to meet the estimate. The account is spread equally over the employee's pay periods and deposited into the employee's flexible spending account. Employees then submit documentation of healthcare/dependent care expenses, and the third party administrator mails or direct deposits a check directly to the employee. The maximum deferral amounts are subject to IRS regulations and, therefore, may change.

The deferral amount can be changed only if a qualifying event occurs during the plan year. Some examples of qualifying events are: birth, adoption, death, marriage, divorce, or termination of spouse's employment.

Note: Under IRS regulations, an employee must forfeit any money that remains in the flexible spending account at the end of the plan year.

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5.3 Medical, Dental, and Vision Insurance

A. Coverage Commencement

For regular, benefits eligible employees (see Section 2.1) benefits begin the first (1st) day of the first (1st) full month of employment.

B. Insurance Coverage Applications

To obtain coverage under the insurance plans, an eligible employee must complete the Enrollment form and return the form to HR within thirty (30) days of the start date of regular employment. Applications by subscribers are also accepted annually during the University's benefits open enrollment period, and in the event of a qualifying status change (e.g., marriage, birth of a child). Employees who fail to submit enrollment forms within thirty (30) days of eligibility will be enrolled in default levels of coverage.

No person acquires any right to services and benefits under any group medical, dental, or vision coverage plans until the applications are accepted.

C. Dependent Coverage

A new employee may enroll any of the following persons for comprehensive health care coverage as part of the initial application during the first (1st) full month of employment:

  1. A legal spouse or Legally Domiciled Adult (LDA), and
  2. Children under the age of 26 (natural children, stepchildren, foster children, adopted children, children for whom you are the court appointed guardian, children of LDA when your LDA is also covered). Children over 26 years of age may be covered if disabled prior to reaching the limiting age.

Employees can make dependent coverage changes:

  1. annually during open enrollment; or
  2. when a qualifying status change occurs. Employees must complete a status change request within 31days. Addition of a dependent child at birth, adoption or placement for adoption must be made within 60 days. Changes due to coverage under Medicaid or a state child health plan ("CHIP") must also be made within 60 days.

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5.4 *Option to Waive Coverage

Employees covered under another medical or dental plan may waive their medical and dental benefits if they provide proof of coverage on an annual basis.

The following benefits may not be waived:

  1. Basic Life Insurance
  2. Long-Term Disability Insurance
  3. Basic Accidental Death & Dismemberment Insurance

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5.5 *Short-Term Disability

Short-Term Disability is a benefit offered by the University to preserve partial income of those benefits eligible employees who are unable to work because of a medical condition.

A. Eligibility Requirements

An employee who has completed twelve (12) continuous months of active employment (see Section 2.3) with the University prior to the onset of the disability is eligible for this benefit. An employee must be disabled for thirty (30) consecutive calendar days to apply for this benefit.

B. Coverage

This plan takes effect on the 31st calendar day of disability. Total sick leave and Short-Term Disability payments will cease at the end of 180 days from the date of the onset of disability.

C. Benefits

As long as the employee remains in paid status, benefits and leave accrual will continue. The employee may elect to use accrued sick leave and/or vacation to supplement the partial income replacement under Short-Term Disability. A written authorization to use accrued sick leave or vacation hours during Short-Term Disability must be submitted to Human Resources.

Refer to Appendix F for more information about Short-Term Disability.

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5.6 *Long-Term Disability

Long-Term Disability (LTD) is a benefit offered by the University to preserve partial income of those benefits eligible employees who are unable to work because of a medical condition. LTD picks up when Short-Term Disability benefits have been exhausted.

A. Eligibility Requirements

An active, benefits eligible employee (see Sections 2.1 and 2.3) working at .80 FTE or more (30 hours/week) is eligible to apply for LTD Insurance. Coverage begins on the first (1st) day of the thirteenth (13th) month of active employment.

B. Coverage

LTD benefits take effect after satisfying 180 consecutive calendar days of disability. The benefit under the LTD plan is sixty percent (60%) of salary up to a maximum of $9,000 per month. The employee's LTD benefit may be reduced by the amount of other income replacement benefits (such as Social Security or workers' compensation) the employee receives for the same disability.

C. Benefits

An employee on long-term disability may continue to participate in the University's health care benefits program. Coverage cost and period of coverage are determined by the rules and regulations of the federal COBRA program.

Refer to the plan documents maintained in the HR Benefits Office for more information about the LTD plan. LTD benefits continue as long as the employee remains disabled according to the standards set forth by the insurance carrier.

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5.7 *Group Term Life Insurance and Accidental Death & Dismemberment (AD&D) Insurance

All active, benefits eligible employees (see Sections 2.1 and 2.3) and Union employees are eligible to participate in the basic life and AD&D insurance programs. Employees may also purchase supplemental life, dependent life, and family AD&D insurance coverage for eligible spouses and dependents (supplemental amounts and premiums are age-based). Contact the HR Benefits Office for details.

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5.8 *Retirement Plan

A. Eligibility and Enrollment

Eligibility for the University's Defined Contribution Retirement Plan is based on twelve (12) continuous months of service at half-time or greater, unless prior service credit applies (see Section 5.10). HR notifies employees when they become eligible. To participate in the plan, employees must complete the necessary form(s) before the date of eligibility.

B. 403(b) Defined Contribution Retirement Plan

The University offers a 403(b) Defined Contribution Retirement Plan to eligible employees. Once the employee is eligible, the University contributes ten percent (10%) of base salary to an account of the employee's choice with either TIAA-CREF or Fidelity Investments. Participating employees are immediately 100% vested (i.e., retirement account is owned by the employee) at enrollment. Enrollment materials and plan documents are available in the HR Benefits Office.

Special note: An employee who fails to return the enrollment form(s) by the end of the month in which eligibility occurs will by default be enrolled in a TIAA-CREF Group Retirement Account and contributions will be deposited in the CREF Money Market Account. At any subsequent time, by contacting TIAA-CREF, the participant may transfer account accumulations to either a Fidelity Investments account or into other funds offered by TIAA-CREF.

C. Supplementary Retirement Account Plan

Eligible employees may make additional, tax-deferred contributions by salary reduction, on a monthly basis (except for months in which no salary is paid). The premiums may be applied to regular group retirement contracts or TIAA-CREF's Group Supplemental Retirement Annuity (GSRA) contracts, or Fidelity Investments or both at the employee's election. Contributions are subject to the contribution limitations of Sections 402(g) and 415 of the Internal Revenue code.

Plan representatives offer limited counseling services about the options available through the University retirement plans. Plan representatives may also make referrals to investment professionals who offer in-depth planning services.

D. Plan Contributions During a Leave of Absence

Retirement contributions continue to be made based on compensation paid during a leave of absence. No contributions are made during an unpaid portion of any leave of absence.

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5.9 *Benefits on Re-employment at the University

Full-time faculty and regular staff employees who are rehired within one (1) year of separation of service from Seattle University are given recognition for prior service for the following employee benefits:

  • The rate of vacation accrual will be reinstated to the same rate in place prior to separation of employment,
  • Sick leave days accrued but unused prior to separation will be reinstated, and
  • Eligibility for tuition remission benefits will be reinstated upon reemployment if the eligibility period had been satisfied during prior service.

An employee who had previously met the Employees Retirement Plan’s eligibility requirement will be eligible to participate in the plan for the purposes of the University’s contributions as of her reemployment date provided she is an eligible employee at that time. Prior service will count toward the retirement plan’s eligibility requirement provided that the employee completed 1,000 or more hours of service within the period constituting her eligibility year of service. Refer to the official plan document for more information.

Unused sick leave hours will be reinstated under the “Sick Leave for Other Employees” arrangement described at 9.1.D. if a participant’s reemployment occurs within seven (7) months of the prior separation of employment.

 
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5.10 *Recognition of Prior Employment at an Accredited Institution for Some Benefits

The University recognizes qualifying former employment, as defined below, to determine eligibility for certain benefits upon employment.

A. Two (2) Years Prior Service - Retirement Benefits

If an employee has established prior employment based on the following criteria, the University will begin contributions to a retirement account the first (1st) full month of employment. Employees must:
i. Be at least 21 years of age;
ii. Have completed two (2) years of continuous full-time employment at accredited* institutions of higher education. "Continuous" is defined as two consecutive years in higher education allowing only non-working breaks of service.

B. Five (5) or More Years Prior Employment - Vacation/Tuition Benefit Programs

For employees who have completed five (5) or more years of continuous full-time employment at a single accredited* institution of higher education immediately prior to employment:
i. Initial vacation benefits upon employment will accrue based on completed years with the prior employer. The timing of subsequent adjustments to the vacation benefit will be based on accumulated service years with the university; and
ii. Eligibility requirements for tuition benefit programs are satisfied upon employment.

* Prior university must be accredited in accordance with Seattle University policy.

"Immediately prior" is defined as higher education being the last place of employment. If during the course of employment at the prior university the employee has a non-working break in service of no longer than six months, and all other criteria are met, prior service requirements will be satisfied.

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Resources

TIAA-CREF: http://www.tiaa-cref.com
Fidelity Investments: http://www.fidelityatwork.com

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Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

6. Other Benefits

* = Policies and procedures that apply to Faculty.

Introduction

This section of the policy manual is an introduction to benefits afforded to all University employees as required by federal and/or state law.

6.1 *Worker's Compensation

In compliance with state law, the University carries worker's compensation insurance for all employees for injuries and illnesses incurred on the job. There is a deduction from the employee's paycheck for this insurance. All job related injuries or illnesses must be reported immediately to the supervisor. HR explains these responsibilities to the supervisor and to Campus Public Safety and provides assistance in completing the necessary paperwork.

The employee must report all injuries to Campus Public Safety the same day the injury occurs. Employees have the right to seek medical care for injuries or illnesses resulting from the course of their work with the University. Supervisors must not refuse to send employee(s) for medical care even if the injury appears not to be serious. Worker's compensation insurance pays the medical expenses legitimately arising out of a job-related injury or illness.

Refer to Appendix A for additional worker's compensation information (or visit http://www.workerscompensationinsurance.com/workers_compensation/washington.htm).

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6.2 *The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986 (COBRA)

Employees who stand to lose health insurance and other medical benefits due to a qualifying status change (e.g., termination of employment, retirement) may elect to continue health insurance coverage at group rates, at their own expense, under the federal COBRA law. Self-paid continued coverage is also available to covered spouses and/or dependents of employees. When a qualifying event occurs, HR notifies covered employees and their dependents of their options. Additional information may be obtained at http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/health-plans/cobra.htm. Contact the HR Benefits Office with any questions about the administration of COBRA.

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6.3 *Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA)

The University's welfare and pension plans are covered under ERISA. According to the Act, an employee is entitled to review and receive information about the University's welfare and pension plans (see Sections 5.3 through 5.8 for plan outlines). Plan information is provided to employees in their packet of benefits information.

Refer to Appendix B for more information on ERISA or visit http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/health-plans/erisa.htm.

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6.4 *Unemployment Insurance

The University has established a reserve account and reimburses the Washington State Employment Security Department for unemployment benefits paid to former employees in accordance with the laws of the State of Washington. There is no deduction from employees' paychecks for this insurance. For more information, visit http://www.wa.gov/esd/.

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Resources

Worker's Compensation: http://www.wa.gov/lni/insurance
The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986 (Cobra): http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/health-plans/cobra.htm
Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (Erisa): http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/health-plans/erisa.htm

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

7. Tuition Program Benefits

The University provides tuition remission benefits for eligible employees and their dependents and is a participating institution in the Faculty and Staff Children Exchange (FACHEX) and Tuition Exchange programs. Tuition benefit programs are designed to provide financial assistance toward the cost of post-secondary tuition.
Requirements, benefits, limitations and other plan information are posted to the Compensation/Benefits section of the University’s Human Resources website at: http://www.seattleu.edu/hr/Tuition_Benefits.aspx. The University retains the right to modify or change the tuition programs at any time with thirty (30) days' notice to employees. Any change that occurs during a quarter will be effective as of the start of the next quarter.

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

8. * Privileges and Amenities

The University provides additional special privileges and amenities for employees. Contact HR for additional information and specifics regarding these additional privileges and amenities:

  • On-campus parking
  • Connolly Center use
  • Library privileges
  • Payroll direct deposit
  • Credit Union membership
  • Savings Bonds
  • Home Loan program

* = Policies and procedures that apply to Faculty.

Public Transportation Subsidy

The University offers regular full- and part-time employees a subsidy on a selection of transportation passes. An employee who purchases a parking permit cannot receive a subsidized transportation pass. Forms are available in HR. Replacements for lost transportation passes are purchased at full price. Refunds will not be made after the first (1st) day of the month for passes not picked up, or for changes in transportation plans.

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

9. Leave Benefits

* = Policies and procedures that apply to Faculty.

9.1 *Sick Leave

A. Purpose

The University regards sick leave as a form of insurance available to employees when the need arises. The University's sick leave policy is designed to protect the income of employees during periods of  non-occupational illness or injury, for personal safety reasons related to domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking; or for closure of the workplace or a family member’s school or care location by a public official to limit health hazards. Sick leave may be used for the employee's own needs or to provide care to a family member.

B. Sick Leave for Regular Staff and Administrators

Regular staff and administrator employees are awarded one (1) day of paid sick leave each month that they are actively employed by the University. Sick leave does not accrue during periods of an unpaid leave of absence. A maximum of sixty (60) days of sick leave may be accumulated. Unused sick leave may be carried over from one fiscal year to the next. Employees are not eligible to be paid for unused, accrued sick leave upon separation from employment.

C. Sick Leave for Full-time Faculty

Full-time faculty are awarded sixty (60) days of sick leave each academic year.  Unused sick leave cannot be carried forward from academic year to academic year. Faculty members are responsible for communicating absences to their Chair and assist in ensuring that their instructional responsibilities are fulfilled. Additionally, faculty members who cannot attend classroom or other instructional responsibilities normally make alternative arrangements for their students. Faculty are not eligible to be paid for unused, accrued sick leave upon separation from employment.

D. Sick Leave for Other Employees

Temporary, occasional or on-call staff employees and part-time faculty will be awarded one (1) hour of sick leave for every 30 hours worked or credited by the University. A maximum of 72 hours of sick leave may be accumulated. Unused sick leave may be carried over from one fiscal year to the next unless the employee incurs a separation from employment. Employees are not eligible to be paid for unused, accrued sick leave upon separation from employment.

E. Employees Ineligible for Sick Leave

Student employees as well as independent contractors, consultants and other non-employees are excluded from eligibility for sick leave.

E. Accounting for Sick Leave Taken

Employees, other than faculty, are required to account for their sick leave usage by completing the appropriate payroll time report and obtaining the supervisor’s signature. Used sick leave is deducted from the employee's sick leave balance. An employee's record of used sick leave and absences becomes part of his employment record.

F. No Deficit Balance Allowed

Employees are paid sick leave up to the maximum accrued hours as of the pay period in which the time is taken. Employees cannot be paid for sick leave in a "deficit balance" against future accruals. Therefore, additional approved time away for which an employee does not have sufficient sick leave accrued constitutes vacation or unpaid time.

G. Absence Substantiation  

The University maintains the right to request third-party substantiation for absences of five (5) or more consecutive work days. For example, a statement from the employee’s healthcare provider may be required. The University also reserves the right to direct the employee to a second medical evaluation with a healthcare provider selected and paid for by the University.

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9.2 Sick Leave Sharing Program for Regular Staff Employees

The Sick Leave Sharing Program is a means to transfer sick leave to regular staff employees through employee donations. The transfer occurs when a regular staff employee is in need of additional leave after exhausting his own accrued sick leave and all but five (5) days vacation because of a serious personal illness or injury. This leave is intended for use during the qualifying thirty (30) day period preceding eligibility for the University's Short-Term Disability.

A. Intent and Calculation of the Sick Leave Sharing Program

The program is intended to continue salary for an employee who sustains a serious or catastrophic illness or injury that requires hospitalization, outpatient treatment, home health care and/or ongoing medical care (from a physician or other licensed healthcare provider) until thirty (30) calendar days have passed and the employee would then qualify for Short-Term Disability insurance coverage. The program does not include common illness or conditions resulting from any occupationally related injury or illness and for which workers' compensation benefits have been awarded. This program does not include donated sick leave for the care of a child or dependent with an extended illness. Sick leave days are transferred directly from donor to recipient, paid at the recipient's current rate of pay. Human Resources coordinates calculations and payroll instructions. The University reserves the right to request a written statement from the attending physician stating the extent of the requesting employee's injury or the nature of the illness.

B. Eligibility to Receive or Donate Shared Sick Leave

All regular staff employees (see Section 2.1) are eligible to participate in the program as a donor or recipient. Human Resources certifies eligibility.

C. Maximum Donated or Received Sick Leave per Employee

Employees can donate a maximum of five (5) days of sick leave in any twelve (12) month period and must keep a balance of no less than ten (10) days for themselves after each transfer. An eligible employee can receive a maximum of twenty-two (22) days in donated sick leave in any twelve (12) month period. Employees who terminate are unable to donate unused sick leave to the program at the time of separation.

D. Procedures for Leave Donation

Human Resources maintains a list of employees requesting to be included as potential donors of sick leave days. Employees who wish to donate sick leave days may submit a Sick Leave Sharing Program pledge card to HR.  Human Resources will contact donors prior to the transfer of pledged days to confirm continued willingness to participate in the sick leave sharing program and as notification of the number of days to be transferred. Once confirmed, the donor’s accrued sick leave hours and pledge amount will be reduced by the number of hours required to satisfy the need.

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9.3 Vacation

The University grants vacation leave to eligible non-faculty employees for rest and recreation and as recognition for service.

Employees are expected to give advance notice when requesting vacation time (preferably two (2) weeks' notice) to allow the supervisor to evaluate staffing needs. The University reserves the right to deny approval of a requested vacation on the basis of service needs. When two employees request similar vacation dates, supervisors are encouraged to balance the interests of each employee and the University. Supervisors should also give consideration to employee seniority and to other approved vacations granted to employees during the same year.

A. Vacation Schedule

Special rules apply to the Law School staff who were employed at the time of the January 14, 1994 transfer. Please consult the HR Benefits Office for details.

  1. Staff: Vacations for regular exempt and non-exempt employees (see Section 2.1) in pay bands A - C4 are based on continuous and completed years of service, according to the following schedule:
    Years of Employment Days of Vacation
    Date of hire through 5 years: 10 days
    6 years through 10 years: 15 days
    11th year forward: 20 days
  2. Administrators: Vacation for regular full-time exempt employees (see Section 2.1) in pay bands D & E are based on continuous and completed years of service according to the following schedule:
    Years of Employment Days of Vacation
    Date of hire through 4 years: 15 days
    5 years through 10 years: 20 days
    11th Year: 21 days
    12th Year: 22 days
    13th Year: 23 days
    14th Year: 24 days
    15th Year and thereafter: 25 days
  3. Eligible Part-Time Employees: Part-time employees assigned a schedule of at least twenty (20) hours per week receive pro-rated paid vacation leave. Those who are regularly scheduled for less than twenty (20) hours per week are not eligible for paid vacation leave.

B. Vacation Accrual

Vacation time begins to accrue with the first month of service if the employee has joined the University during the first fifteen (15) days of the month. Employees who begin on or after the sixteenth (16th) of the month begin to accrue vacation time on the first day of the next month. An employee on an unpaid leave does not accrue vacation time. Employees may carry over a vacation balance into the new fiscal year the amount of days equal to one (1) year's worth of vacation accrual plus five (5) additional days. Employees on a less than twelve (12) month work schedule will accrue vacation for each month that they are actively working.

Questions about computing vacation time can be directed to HR.

  1. Forfeiture of Excess Vacation Accrued: Any accrued vacation time in excess of the maximum allowed accrual is forfeited on June 30th of each year. Employees are encouraged to monitor their vacation balances and plan for time off to avoid loss of accrued vacation.
  2. Availability of Vacation Hours: An employee is eligible to request vacation time once it is accumulated without a waiting period. Vacation leave is not a cashable benefit during active (see Section 2.3) employment with the University.
  3. No Deficit Vacation Account: Employees may be paid vacation time up to the maximum accrued hours as of the beginning of the pay period in which the vacation time is taken. Employees will not be paid for vacation time in a "deficit balance" against future accruals. Therefore, additional approved time off for which an employee does not have sufficient vacation accrued is unpaid time.
  4. Vacation Payout Provisions on Separation: Accrued vacation leave is paid at the time of the employee's separation. An employee is ineligible for a payout of accrued vacation at separation if she fails to provide the required notice of resignation (refer to Section 12.2).

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9.4 *Holidays

The University observes twelve (12) paid holidays each year and the University is closed on those days. Prior to the beginning of each fiscal year, the University determines which holidays to observe based on the academic calendar. To meet academic schedule needs, some University holidays are observed on days other than the customarily recognized day.

The University standard holidays are:

  1. New Year's Day
  2. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
  3. President's Day
  4. Good Friday
  5. Monday after Easter (except for the School of Law which will instead be closed on the Friday before Memorial Day)
  6. Memorial Day
  7. Independence Day
  8. Labor Day
  9. Veterans Day
  10. Thanksgiving Day
  11. Day After Thanksgiving
  12. Christmas Day

Note: When Christmas Eve occurs on a workday, the University will close at 12:00pm (noon).

A. Eligibility For Holiday Pay

All employees in active status (see Section 2.3) are eligible for holiday pay. If an employee is on a scheduled vacation preceding or following the holiday, he receives pay for the holiday. An employee on an unpaid leave of absence during which a holiday occurs is not eligible for holiday pay during the unpaid leave.

B. Holidays for Employees Under Collective Bargaining Agreements

The terms and conditions for holiday schedules and holiday pay specific for employees of collective bargaining groups are defined by the terms of the respective union contract.

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9.5 *December Closure - Additional Paid Time Off

The University closes all academic and administrative services during the week between December 25th and January 1st of each year. (Limited operations personnel are assigned during this time.) Employees are released from work during this week. The University administration specifies the dates of the December Closure when setting the academic calendar for each fiscal year. Employees must be actively employed before and following the December Closure to be eligible for this pay. Employees who separate before or during the December Closure are not eligible to receive this pay. If an employee is on a scheduled vacation preceding or following the December Closure week, he receives pay for the December closure.

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9.6 *Bereavement Leave

All eligible employees will be allowed up to five (5) days leave, with pay, for time lost due to the death of a family member. The leave time includes making arrangements for and/or attending final observances as well as time required to conduct personal business related to the death of the family member. Days off may be intermittent or consecutive.

Full-time employees are granted up to five (5) working days of bereavement leave. Part-time employees (those scheduled to work at least 0.53 FTE) are granted leave equal to the number of hours the employee is normally scheduled to work during one work week.

If an employee needs additional days, he may use vacation leave or time without pay.

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9.7 Personal Emergency Leave

The University, at its discretion, may permit paid time off ranging from one (1) to ten (10) working days to enable a regular, benefits-eligible staff employee to respond to a personal emergency situation for which no other leave hours (vacation or sick leave) are available. As with any other absence, the employee is expected to notify his/her supervisor as soon as the situation is known. Requests for emergency leave must be submitted to the Human Resources department and will require substantiation of the nature of the emergency. An example of an emergency that may be approved is an unexpected and severe medical episode for a parent requiring the employee’s primary care. HR will determine whether to grant the request and number of days granted.
A separate leave policy applies to faculty and can be found in the Faculty Handbook.

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9.8 Community Service Leave

The Community Service Leave Policy is an effort to encourage and support staff to more fully embrace Seattle University's mission, vision and values through sustained partnerships in the community. The purpose of the leave is to allow employees to voluntarily participate, with pay, in community service activities that occur during regularly scheduled work hours. This policy is designed to provide employees an opportunity to deepen their connection to SU's mission, vision and values, to embody our Jesuit Catholic values through service and to engage with the community. Regular, post-service reflection opportunities are available for interested employees.

A. Definition and Intent of Community Service Leave

Community Service activities are defined as those carried out in alignment with Seattle University’s mission of educating the whole person, professional formation, and empowering leaders for a just and humane world; its vision of becoming the premier independent university of the Northwest in academic quality, Jesuit Catholic inspiration and service to society; and its values of Care, Academic Excellence, Diversity, Faith, Justice and Leadership. Community Service activities may include volunteering at schools, faith-based, or non-profit organizations.

Note: Seattle University is a Section 501(c) (3) tax exempt organization. It is prohibited from participating or intervening, directly or indirectly, in any political campaign on behalf of or in opposition to any candidate for public office, and has limits on the entext to which it can engage in lobbying activities. Therefore, employees may not use Community Service Leave to engage in political campaign-related activities or lobbying activities. Questions regarding prohibited political campaign intervention or lobbying should be directed to the Office of University Counsel.

B. Eligibility and Benefit Criteria

Benefits eligible staff with an FTE of .75 or higher will receive three (3) working days every July 1 to engage in service to the community throughout the year. Those benefits eligible employees under .75 FTE receive 1.5 working days. These days do not accrue, do not count as hours worked for purposes of overtime, do not carry over into subsequent fiscal years, and are not paid out upon separation from the university. Employees who change FTE mid-year will not experience a change in Community Service Leave hours until the following July 1. Community Service Leave hours will not run into the negative; any accidental overage will be recorded as unpaid leave.

Participation in certain University sponsored immersion programs will follow Community Service Leave request procedures, but time away from work does not count against an individual's Community Service Leave balance.

C. Requesting and Using Leave

Requests for Community Service Leave are made in writing using the Community Service Leave Request Form and approved by the employee’s supervisor. Requests for approval of leave should ordinarily be submitted at least thirty (30) days in advance of the proposed service, and must be scheduled so as not to create an undue hardship on the conduct of university business. Community Service Leave may be taken in full or partial day increments and may be used for one-time or regularly occurring community service opportunities. Supervisors should not consider hiring additional temporary staff to "fill in" for employees on a university-approved Community Service Leave.

Community Service Leave hours are coded as "Community Service Leave" on timesheets for non-exempt employees, or on leave reports for exempt employees.

Resources

  1. Community Service Leave Request Form
  2. Non-exempt employee timesheet
  3. Exempt employee leave report

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Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

10. Leaves of Absence

* = Policies and procedures that apply to Faculty.

10.1 *Personal Leave of Absence

Full-time regular and part-time regular employees who have completed twelve (12) months of continuous service may request unpaid personal leaves of absence for a period of up to thirty (30) days. An employee must request personal leave in writing at least thirty (30) days before the time the employee wishes the leave to begin. If the personal leave request is necessitated by an emergency, the employee must notify the supervisor and HR as soon as is practicable and follow up with a written explanation of the nature of the leave and the expected length of absence. Personal leave may be granted for a variety of reasons (e.g., medical, family, personal needs) at the University's discretion, provided that the employee is in good standing and the leave does not disrupt the department's or the University's business and operational needs.

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10.2 *Educational Leave of Absence

Unpaid educational leaves of absence for a period of up to twelve (12) months may be requested by full-time regular employees in good standing who have completed twelve (12) months of continuous service. An employee must request educational leave in writing at least three (3) months before the time the employee wishes the leave to begin. The educational institution must be an accredited college or be University-approved as a qualified educational institution. The academic program being pursued must be beneficial to the University as well as to the employee. Determination to allow education leave rests with the department head and the area Vice President based on the operational needs of the University and the department.

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10.3 *Reinstatement Following Personal or Educational Leave

Reinstatement cannot be guaranteed to employees returning from personal or educational leave. The University endeavors, however, to place employees returning from personal or educational leave in their former position or in a position comparable in status and pay, subject to budgetary restrictions, the University's need to fill vacancies, and the ability of the University to find qualified temporary replacements.

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10.4 *Benefits While on Personal or Educational Leave

An employee on unpaid personal or educational leave will not accrue vacation or sick leave during the unpaid leave. An employee on an unpaid personal or educational leave of absence greater than one (1) full benefit month may continue to participate in the University's health care benefits program (except Short-Term Disability and Long-Term Disability) by self-paying the full premium rates. While on an unpaid personal or educational leave of absence, contributions to retirement plans will cease.

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10.5 *Military Leave

The University complies with state and federal requirements regarding leaves of absence and reemployment rights for individuals serving in the National Guard or Armed Forces of the United States. The following is a general statement of the rights and obligations of the University and its employees. Employees and their supervisors should contact HR for specific information.

Service Credit: An employee's employment with the University while on military leave is considered continuous for purposes of determining seniority, eligibility for University benefits, and service awards. Sick leave and vacation do not accrue during military service.

Reservist and National Guard Annual Training: A full-time employee with at least twelve (12) months continuous service is protected against the loss of income as a result of his participation in annual encampment or training duty in the U.S. Military Reserves or the National Guard. The University pays the difference between what he earns from the government for the military service, including any housing, clothing, and food allowance, and what he would have earned at normal straight time pay on the job. Any travel allowance is excluded from the deducted amount. This difference is paid for up to ten (10) University workdays in a calendar year.

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10.6 *Jury Duty

The University recognizes that employees have a civic responsibility to serve as jurors when called by the courts. The University grants time off with pay to a regular employee (see Section 2.1) who is called for jury duty. The employee must return to the University any juror fees that exceed the cost of meals, lodging and travel.

In exceptional cases, if an employee's absence from work would impose a hardship on the department, HR will request that the employee reschedule the dates the employee is expected to serve on jury duty.

An employee who is summoned as a member of a jury will be granted a leave for all hours required for the duty. If the jury call does not require absence for the entire workday, the employee must return to work on release by the court. The employee will be paid full salary while serving the jury duty, but paid time spent on jury duty does not count as "hours worked" at the University for purposes of overtime.

The University does not reimburse an employee for meals, lodging, and travel expenses incurred while serving as a juror. The employee must provide HR with a copy of the jury summons, which is filed in the employee's personnel file.

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10.7 *Subpoena

An employee subpoenaed as a witness in a legal proceeding should notify her supervisor. The University will grant a paid leave of absence for up to one (1) full work day. If the proceeding does not require absence for the entire workday, the employee must return to work on completion of the legal proceeding. The date and time that witnesses are expected to appear for legal proceedings are often times subject to change. Whenever possible, the University expects the employee to cooperate with the supervisor in arranging to respond to the subpoena at a date and time that is least disruptive to the work schedule and to the University's operations.

The University will not grant paid leave for a court appearance or legal proceeding when the employee is a party to the litigation. In that case, an employee may use vacation time.

Paid time spent in responding to a subpoena does not count as "hours worked" at the University for purposes of overtime.

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10.8 *Maternity Disability Leave

An employee will be provided with an unpaid leave of absence for the actual period of time she is sick or temporarily disabled because of pregnancy or childbirth. This is in addition to an eligible female employee's right to take leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) discussed in Section 10.9. The employee must present written documentation from her physician specifying the period of temporary disability. An employee on unpaid maternity disability leave must use accrued sick leave. An employee who is absent for the actual period of maternal disability will be returned to the same or similar job.

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10.9 *Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

Family and medical leave may be used by eligible faculty and staff in the following instances:

  • For incapacity due to pregnancy, prenatal medical care or child birth;
  • To care for the employee’s child following birth, or placement for adoption or foster care;
  • To care for a spouse, registered domestic partner, legally domiciled adult, child, or parent who has a serious health condition,
  • To care for a covered military service member who has sustained serious injury or illness;
  • To care for a child age 18 and older if the child has a disability (described as an impairment that substantially limits a major life function) and who is incapable of self-care because of that disability;
  • For the employee's own serious health condition that renders the employee unable to perform his job;
  • To address certain qualifying urgent needs as a parent, spouse or partner to immediate family members who are on active military duty or called to active duty status.

The University’s family and medical leave benefit is subject to the requirements of the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”). Additional information on an employee’s rights and responsibilities under FMLA is available at http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/posters/fmlaen.pdf.

A. Eligibility for FMLA

An employee must have been employed by the University for twelve (12) months (cumulative prior service) and worked at least 1,250 hours during the twelve (12) month period immediately preceding the commencement of the leave. Eligible employees are generally entitled to up to twelve (12) workweeks of unpaid family and medical leave during any rolling twelve (12) month period. However, an eligible employee may also take up to 26 workweeks of leave during a single 12-month period to care for a covered service member with a serious injury or illness, when the employee is the spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin of the service member. Each time an employee takes leave qualifying under FMLA, the available leave entitlement is the balance remaining for the twelve (12) month period.

Family leave taken for the care of a newly arrived child must be taken all at once and within 12 months after the arrival of the child. Leave may be taken on an intermittent basis for the care of a seriously ill spouse, child, parent, or the employee. For an ill spouse, child, or parent, the University reserves the right to require certification from a health care provider concerning the serious health condition (including certification that the employee is needed to care for the family member and an estimate of the duration of such care). For an employee's own illness, the University reserves the right to require certification that the employee is unable to perform the essential elements of his or her job. The University may also request a second opinion, at the University's expense. Certification may also be required of an employee wishing to take leave on an intermittent or reduced schedule basis because of medical necessity.

A husband and wife who are eligible for FMLA leave and are both employed at the University may be limited to a combined total of twelve (12) workweeks of leave during any twelve-month period under certain circumstances. Please contact HR or see the Department of Labor regulations for additional information.

Family and medical leave is unpaid leave. An employee must exhaust all accumulated sick leave at the onset of the leave period for their own serious health condition. An employee may use vacation time to continue paid status following exhaustion of sick leave. An employee may use sick or vacation time to continue paid status to provide care for a spouse, child, parent or military service member. Accumulation of additional leave is suspended for an employee during any full month of unpaid leave. An employee ceases to accrue sick leave and vacation while on family and medical leave once the employee exhausts sick leave and vacation (to the extent the employee chooses to use vacation to help fund the leave).

B. Requests for FMLA

When requesting FMLA leave, the employee is required to fill out a form available from Human Resources and provide thirty (30) days' notice when circumstances are foreseeable. If notice is foreseeable and is not given, the University reserves the right to deny the leave until the thirty (30) days' notice is given. Human Resources will respond in writing to all requests for family and medical leave.

C. Re-employment Following FMLA

In most cases, an employee will be required to submit a fitness for duty certification prior to being restored to employment. In some cases, an employee will be required to furnish periodic reports of his status and intent to return to work. An employee returns from family and medical leave to his or her former position or, at the discretion of the University, to an equivalent position with equivalent benefits, pay, and other terms and conditions of employment. An employee on family and medical leave continues to be subject to changed business conditions, layoff, or reorganization the University deems to be a business necessity. The University may deny job restoration to a senior administrator (among the highest paid ten percent (10%) of all the University's employees) if the denial is necessary to prevent substantial and grievous economic injury to the operation of the University.

The University requires the employee to provide two (2) days' written notice if he intends to return early from family and medical leave.

If an employee does not intend to return to work following family and medical leave, she must submit a written resignation at the earliest possible date. Failure to do so may result in loss of accrued vacation pay on separation. Failure to return to work and to submit a written resignation within five (5) business days after the scheduled return date will result in immediate termination of the employee.

D. Health Care Benefits While on FMLA

As long as an employee continues to be in a paid status (i.e., by virtue of being on paid leave), the University will continue to contribute toward insurance benefits and the group retirement plan for up to twelve (12) workweeks for any eligible employee on medical and family leave. The employee is responsible for his share of any insurance premium not covered by the University. Arrangements for payment of premiums while on unpaid leave are made through HR prior to commencement of the leave. The University reserves the right to recover any and all insurance premiums paid on behalf of the employee during the period of the leave if an employee is terminated following a medical and family leave. Premiums will not be recovered if the employee does not return because of the continuation or recurrence of illness or something else beyond the employee's control.

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Resources

Family Medical Leave Act: http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/posters/fmlaen.pdf.

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

11. Performance Evaluation

11.1 Performance Review

The University, believing feedback is important, provides assessment of employees through a performance review program. Generally, employees receive a review after three (3) months of employment. All employees receive an annual performance review. Performance reviews are signed by the supervisor and the employee and are forwarded to HR. Additional performance reviews may be conducted if a department head or supervisor notes that an employee's work performance level is unacceptable. The written review is forwarded to HR after the follow-up review discussion with the employee.

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11.2 Unsatisfactory Work Performance

Supervisors are responsible for the guidance, training, and development of employees under their direction. Supervisors should ensure that each employee knows and understands work performance expectations. When performance consistently fails to meet stipulated expectations, the supervisor is obligated to take action, and she should consult with HR about the situation.

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11.3 Special Reviews

Special performance reviews are conducted when appropriate. Examples of appropriate times are when an employee has moved from one department to another, when the employee is being considered for promotion, or when an employee needs to know of a material deficiency in performance.

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Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

12. Separation/Termination

12.1 Employment At Will

The University follows a policy of "employment at will." This policy of employment at will means that an employee can terminate his or her employment relationship with the University at any time and for any reason and that the University can terminate the employment relationship at any time and for any reason, at the sole discretion of the University. The University cannot guarantee permanent employment or employment for a specific term, nor will the University adhere to or enforce any promises of permanent or specific-term employment made to an employee by any person.

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12.2 Termination of the Employment Relationship

Employment with the University is normally terminated through one of the following actions:

  1. resignation, or voluntary termination by the employee;
  2. dismissal, or involuntary termination by the University for any reason at any time; or
  3. layoff or termination because of a reduction in the workforce or elimination of positions.

Terminations are to be treated in a confidential, professional manner by all concerned. Prior to terminating an employee, the department head or designee should consult with HR.

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12.3 Notice

A. By Employee

An employee desiring to terminate employment, regardless of job classification, is encouraged to give as much notice as possible. An exempt employee who has provided thirty (30) calendar days written notice of resignation will be eligible to receive the cash value of any unused vacation time. A non-exempt employee who has provided ten (10) working days written notice of resignation will be eligible to receive the cash value of any unused vacation time. Written notice of resignation should be provided to the department head, with a copy to the area Vice President and HR. A staff member's date of termination is the last day worked.

In certain instances, when an employee resigns the University may require the employee to leave immediately rather than after the notice period. The University will make this decision based on the best interests of the University's operations and not as a reflection on the employee's integrity. When the University makes such a decision, the employee will receive pay "in lieu of notice."

B. By the University

In the case of dismissal, the University may, but is not required to, give notice of its intent to dismiss an employee. Except in those situations where an employee is terminated for disciplinary reasons, unprofessional behavior, or misconduct, the University will provide written notice of termination as follows:

  1. Exempt employees, thirty (30) calendar days;
  2. Non-exempt employees, ten (10) working days.

In certain instances, the University may require the employee to leave immediately rather than after the notice period. In those instances, the employee will receive pay "in lieu of notice."

In situations where an employee is terminated for disciplinary reasons, unprofessional behavior, or misconduct, the employee will not be eligible to receive the cash value of unused vacation time.

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Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

13. Institutional Policies and Procedures

* = Policies and procedures that apply to Faculty.

13.1 *Equal Employment Opportunity Policy

The University provides equal employment opportunities to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information,  political ideology, or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, including, but not limited to, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfers, leaves of absence, compensation, benefits, and training.

The University administers all policies, practices, and procedures in ways that are consistent with the University's Catholic and Jesuit character.

Contact the University's Assistant Vice President for Human Resources/Equal Opportunity Officer for additional information.

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13.2 *Equal Employment Opportunity Policy Complaint Procedure

Any person who believes he may have been harassed or discriminated against in violation of the principles in Section 13.1 should first discuss the matter with his direct supervisor. If for any reason an employee does not want to discuss the matter with the direct supervisor, the employee may discuss the matter with the department head, or the Associate Vice President for Human Resources/Equal Opportunity Officer ("AVP for HR/EOO").

In all cases, managers, supervisors, directors, or department or division heads who receive any complaint or concern involving harassment or discrimination must bring the matter to the immediate attention of the AVP for HR/EOO.

If the appropriate manager, supervisor, director, department or division head, or the AVP for HR/EOO are not able to resolve a concern or complaint of harassment or discrimination, the AVP for HR/EOO will further investigate the matter and recommend a solution to the relevant Vice President, who will decide how the concern or complaint will be resolved.

Any person who believes that the relevant Vice President has not resolved a concern or complaint in accordance with this Equal Employment Opportunity policy may make a written appeal to the Vice President for Administration or to the Provost, who may reopen the investigation, continue the investigation, or decide how the complaint will be resolved. The written appeal must be submitted within ten (10) working days of the decision of the relevant Vice President. The decision of the Vice President for Administration or the Provost will be final.

Individuals who bring complaints of harassment or discrimination or who participate or cooperate in an investigation shall not be subject to any adverse employment action or other retaliation for having utilized the procedure or participated in the process, even if an investigation shows that there has not been a violation.

Individuals with complaints or concerns about sexual harassment should follow the Sexual Harassment Complaint Procedure in Appendix C. Individuals with complaints or concerns about a failure to accommodate a disability should follow the Section 504/ADA Policy and Appeal Procedure in Appendix E.

The procedures are not designed to restrict or limit the right of any person to file an administrative complaint with a governmental enforcement agency such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or the Washington State Human Rights Commission.

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13.3 *Individuals with Disabilities

Seattle University complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504, of the Rehabilitation Act and applicable state and local laws providing for nondiscrimination in employment against qualified individuals with disabilities. The University also provides reasonable accommodation for such individuals with disabilities.

An employee or applicant seeking an accommodation in connection with employment should first contact the Office of Human Resources for assistance. It is the responsibility of the employee to provide the university with adequate notice of the disability, to request the particular accommodation, and to provide any necessary medical verification of a disability-related need for the accommodation. On receipt of an accommodation request, Human Resources will meet with the requesting individual and other relevant University personnel to determine the individual's needs and the availability of reasonable accommodations. Complete information about accommodations for individuals with disabilities, including appeal procedures, may be found in Appendix E, the Section 504/ADA Policy and Appeal Procedure.

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13.4 *Drug and Substance Abuse Policy

University employees have the responsibility to perform their jobs in a safe, conscientious, and effective manner. University employees must be able to work in a drug-free environment and themselves be free from the effects of drugs. The following conduct is strictly prohibited and may result in immediate termination of employment:

  1. An employee's manufacture, sale, or possession of a controlled substance or drugs not medically authorized.
  2. An employee's use of a controlled substance or drug not medically authorized in the work place, that affects job performance, or poses a hazard to the safety and welfare of the employee or other employees.

If an employee is convicted of a criminal drug statute, she is required to report his or her conviction for a violation occurring in the work place to her immediate supervisor within five (5) days after such conviction.

An employee who observes, or has knowledge of, other employees in a condition that affects their ability to perform job duties or poses a hazard to the safety and welfare of others shall promptly report the condition to her own supervisor.

The University takes seriously its commitment to provide a drug-free working environment. Anyone with a drug or substance abuse problem is encouraged to seek assistance before the problem affects his or her employment status. To comply with the Federal Drug-Free Work-Place Act of 1988, HR provides a list of agencies that provide rehabilitative and counseling services.

On receiving a report of a violation of the Drug/Substance Abuse Policy, the Associate Vice President for HR, the Public Safety Manager, and the Director of Public Safety follow the procedures outlined below.

  1. Gather information and document facts about the incident.
  2. Conduct an investigation into the allegations surrounding the report.
  3. Prepare an investigative summary with all relevant facts and information.
  4. Make recommendations for corrective action.
  5. Determine whether or not the facts warrant the involvement of outside law enforcement agencies.

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13.5 *Sexual Harassment

The University seeks to maintain a learning and working environment free from harassment consistent with its mission and sound business practice. Sexual harassment is a form of unlawful discriminatory conduct that compromises the work environment of employees. Sexual harassment is a form of unlawful discrimination and is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, and the Washington State Law Against Discrimination (RCW Chapter 49.60).

The University is committed to taking all reasonable steps to prevent sexual harassment and does not tolerate sexual harassment in any form between or among members of the University community. Persons of either sex may be victims or perpetrators of harassment. Sexual harassment may occur between persons of the same sex. The University takes appropriate corrective action with those at all levels within the University community who engage in sexually harassing behavior.

All employees are responsible for ensuring that their conduct does not sexually harass any other member of the University community. This includes all academic and employment conditions at the University, wherever students and/or employees are engaged in University business.

The University does not tolerate sexual harassment of an employee by a third party doing business with the University or on the University premises. Independent contractors, vendors, visitors, and others are expected to comply with this policy, and the University will take appropriate corrective action if they fail to do so.

Refer to Appendix C for sections covering the following:

  • Definition of Sexual Harassment
  • Examples of Conduct that May Constitute Sexual Harassment
  • Retaliation
  • Consensual Relationships
  • Responsibilities
  • University Resources for Students and Employees
  • Education and Training
  • Filing a Complaint of Sexual Harassment
  • Investigation Procedures
  • Complaint Resolution and Corrective Action
  • Appeal of Determination of the Complaint
  • Appeal of Corrective Action or Discipline
  • Protection of All Involved Individuals
  • Sanctions for a False Complaint
  • Sexual Harassment Complaints Filed with External Agencies

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13.6 *Complaint Procedure

Misunderstandings or conflicts can arise in any organization. To ensure effective working relations, it is important that such matters be resolved before serious problems develop. If a situation exists that an employee believes is detrimental to the employee or to the University, the employee should follow the procedure described here for bringing the complaint to the University's attention.

The employee should first discuss the matter with his direct supervisor. If the problem is not resolved after discussion with his supervisor, or if for any reason the employee does not want to discuss the matter with his direct supervisor, the employee may discuss the matter with the department head. In an effort to resolve the problem, the department head will consider the facts, conduct any necessary investigation, and may also review the matter with a member of HR. The employee will normally receive a response regarding the problem within five (5) working days of meeting with the department head.

If the employee is not satisfied with the department head's decision and wishes to pursue the problem or complaint further, the employee may submit a written summary of the concerns to the Associate Vice President for Human Resources. The AVP for HR will review and investigate the matter as necessary and decide how the concern or complaint will be resolved. The employee will normally receive a response from the AVP for HR within ten (10) working days.

If the employee is not satisfied with the decision of the AVP for HR, the employee may make a written appeal to the Senior Vice President or to the Provost, who may reopen the investigation, continue the investigation, or decide how the complaint will be resolved. The written appeal must be submitted within five (5) working days of the decision of the AVP for HR. The decision of the Senior Vice President or the Provost will be final.

The University does not tolerate any form of retaliation against employees availing themselves of this complaint procedure. The procedure should not be construed, however, as preventing, limiting, or delaying the University from taking disciplinary action against any individual, up to and including termination, in circumstances (such as those involving problems of overall performance, conduct, attitude, or demeanor) where the University deems disciplinary action appropriate.

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13.7 *Smoking Policy

Smoking is permitted while on break or during the lunch hour. To comply with the Washington State Indoor Clean Air Act and fire codes that apply to the University, smoking is prohibited in all buildings, at all times. This prohibition includes both public spaces and private offices, both during and after working hours. Smoking is permitted outside buildings if:

  1. The smoker is fifty (50) feet or more from the entrance to a building; and
  2. Smoking receptacles have been placed in designated smoking areas.

Each department head, faculty member, manager, supervisor, operator, or other person in charge of an area is responsible for enforcing the University's smoking policy.

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13.8 *Nepotism Policy

The University allows the employment of relatives in the same administrative or academic units so long as (i) one relative does not participate in making recommendations or decisions affecting the appointment, retention, work assignments, promotion, demotion, performance appraisal, or salary of the other relative; and (ii) the work unit is sufficiently large that the employment of relatives does not adversely impact other employees in the unit. No preferential treatment of a relative can be used to deny equal opportunity to other employees. Furthermore, any relative hired by the University must meet normal faculty or employee selection qualifications. For purposes of this policy, "relative" means spouse, state registered domestic partner, legally domiciled adult, mother or father, mother-in-law or father-in-law, son or daughter, brother or sister, son-in-law or daughter-in-law, aunt or uncle, niece or nephew, grandparent or grandchild.

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13.9 *Solicitation and Distribution Rule

The University prohibits solicitation of its personnel or distribution of literature by outsiders at any time. Employees cannot solicit other employees or distribute unauthorized literature during working time or within the working areas of the University. No employee may directly or indirectly sell any item or post any literature within the University or on University property without proper authorization. Questions about this policy should be addressed to Human Resources.

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13.10 *Electronic Media Use Policy

The University maintains standards and expectations for employee use of telephones, electronic mail, and Internet access. Violations of these standards will result in corrective action. Information about these standards is available on the Office of Information Technology website at http://www.seattleu.edu/oit/page.aspx?id=75.

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13.11 *Emergency Procedure

The University is committed to providing for the safety, security, and welfare of the entire campus community. Campus Public Safety is primarily responsible for meeting this commitment including handling emergencies. In case of an emergency:

  1. Go to a campus telephone and dial 5-911 for Campus Public Safety.
  2. Indicate the nature of the emergency; give your name, title or position, and the location from which you are calling.
  3. Stay on the line to answer any questions. Campus Public Safety will initiate the appropriate action in response to your call.

There are some emergencies that demand an immediate response from the Seattle Police, Fire, or Medical Aid Unit(s). Examples of these situations are:

  1. A life-threatening situation.
  2. A significant crime in progress.
  3. A suspect involved in a significant crime is still on the scene or has just fled the scene.
  4. Fire, or indication of fire, or other threat of imminent serious property loss.

In the case of an emergency requiring an immediate response by Seattle Police, Fire, or Medical Aid Unit(s):

  1. Go to the nearest campus telephone and dial 9-911.
  2. Indicate the nature of the emergency and immediate assistance you want.
  3. Give your name and the exact location from which you are calling.
  4. Stay on the line to answer any questions the 911 Operator may ask. Be prepared to give the telephone number from which you are calling, or, if unknown, the University's telephone number (206) 296-6000.
  5. When your call to the 911 Operator is completed, hang up and dial 5-911 to notify Campus Public Safety of the nature of the emergency and the action you have taken. Campus Public Safety will coordinate Police, Fire, or Medical Aid Unit(s) response.

Refer to Appendix D for disaster emergency plans.

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13.12 *Suspended Operations

The President of the University may suspend the operation of all or any portion of the University in an emergency situation. The University will operate under emergency conditions during civil disturbances, riots, electrical or mechanical shutdown, severe weather conditions, or other similar situations. Temporary emergency conditions exist until normal operations can be resumed. The Provost may suspend classes while keeping the administrative offices of the University open. Employees are expected to work if offices are open.

A. Notification of Suspended Operations

Employees affected by suspended operations are given prior notice when possible. All employees are notified through the radio and television media on stations KIRO, KOMO, KING, KUOW and KPLU radio and KCPQ-TV and Northwest Cable News, or by calling the university's Campus Events and Emergency Hotline (296-2200) in the early morning when suspension of university operations is questionable. The Hotline will also carry closure announcements and information about any scheduled programs or activities that will be affected. Closure notices will be posted on Seattle University's public website (http://www.seattleu.edu/).

Each employee is responsible to listen to the radio or call into the university to find out if operations are suspended.

B. Compensation During Suspended Operations

Employees are paid regular wages during the time the University's operations are suspended. The University administration determines if compensation continues during an extended suspension.

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13.13 *Work Place Attire

Discretion and good judgment on the part of employees in their style of dress and personal appearance are essential to the professional image and the safe operation of the University. Employees are expected to dress in a manner appropriate to their working environment and tasks. The University reserves the right to establish and identify guidelines for dress and appearance. Individual departments or units also reserve the right to have their own guidelines on clothing in the workplace appropriate to the nature of their tasks. Employees should consult with their supervisor about attire specific to their department.

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13.14 *Responsibility for Personal Property

The University is not responsible for damage or loss of personal property on or off campus whether or not it is used on behalf of the University.

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13.15 *CampusCards

The University requires all employees to have a University CampusCard ID. Employees will need to show their CampusCard to access facilities and copy machines as well as take advantage of amenities such as the library, the bookstore, dining rooms, Connolly Center, and computer labs. Permanent, temporary and replacement cards are issued at the CampusCard Office. CampusCards must be returned on separation from the University.

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13.16 *Change of Information

Employees are responsible for notifying HR of changes in address, telephone number, or tax status.

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13.17 *Keys

Keys may be given to the appropriate employee for her office, classroom, and/or building. Key authorization forms are available in Campus Public Safety. Under no circumstances may an individual have keys duplicated or permit them to be duplicated. Keys must be returned on separation from the University.

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13.18 *Thefts and Damage

All thefts of or damage to University property by any person must be reported promptly to Campus Public Safety. A report form is available in that office.

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13.19 *Parking

Parking permits and a copy of current parking regulations can be obtained from Campus Public Safety.

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13.20 *Personnel Records

HR maintains the University's permanent employment records, including the personnel files for all employees. An employee's direct supervisor and department head can review the employee's file. If an employee transfers positions within the University, the hiring department head or her designee can review the employee's file. Employees may review their personnel file in the presence of an HR representative. Information in personnel files is released only in response to a court order or a release signed by the employee, or on a "need to know" basis as determined by the Associate Vice President for HR.

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13.21 *Conflict of Interest/Use of University Equipment

The University expects from all employees professional conduct consistent with the University's values and operating standards. The University's assets (including offices, equipment, and confidential information) are intended to support University business purposes. While on University property, employees are prohibited from engaging in personal business enterprise activities for profit. To do so will place the University's not-for-profit status at risk.

Employees are responsible for the care and security of University equipment while under their control. Employees must limit their use of University supplies and equipment (assets) both on or off-campus to official activities and functions of the University. Departments must keep a current record of property located off-campus in the form of descriptions, inventory identification numbers, period of time and location of property taken off-campus, and the person(s) accountable for the property. University policy prohibits the use of University assets for personal use without the proper documentation and/or written authorization by the area Vice President. An employee whose employment has terminated must return all University equipment as of the date of separation from the University.

A conflict of interest also arises if an employee:

  1. Discloses confidential information for personal use, gain, or profit.
  2. Engages in political activities that interfere with his University responsibilities. An employee must avoid giving the impression that he speaks for the University when stating personal political beliefs.

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13.22 *Professional Conduct and Ethical Behavior

As members of the University community, all employees are expected to accept certain responsibilities, adhere to acceptable business principles in matters of personal conduct, and exhibit a high degree of personal integrity at all times. This involves a sincere respect for the rights and feelings of others and requires that in both the employee's business and personal life the employee refrain from any behavior that might be harmful to her co-workers or the University and its community, or that might be viewed unfavorably by students, alumni, or by the public at large. Whether the employee is on duty or off, her conduct reflects on the University. Consequently, employees are encouraged to observe the highest standards of professionalism and ethical conduct at all times.

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13.23 Guidelines for Appropriate Conduct

Listed below are some of the types of behavior and conduct the University considers inappropriate. By engaging in this conduct, an employee invites disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment without prior warning, at the discretion of the University. The employment relationship is "at-will" and may be terminated by the employee or the University for any reason without prior warning. This list contains examples and is not all-inclusive:

  1. Falsifying employment or other University records;
  2. Violating the University's nondiscrimination and/or sexual harassment policies;
  3. Establishing a pattern of excessive absenteeism or tardiness;
  4. Reporting to work intoxicated or under the influence of non-prescribed drugs;
  5. Illegally manufacturing, possessing, using, selling, distributing, or transporting drugs;
  6. Engaging in excessive or unauthorized use of University property or supplies, particularly for personal purposes;
  7. Using alcoholic beverages on University property or while engaged in University business, except where authorized;
  8. Fighting, or using obscene, abusive, or threatening language or gestures;
  9. Stealing property from coworkers, students, or the University;
  10. Having firearms or weapons on University property or while on University business;
  11. Disregarding safety or security regulations;
  12. Engaging in insubordination;
  13. Failing to maintain the confidentiality of University or student information; and
  14. Violating the University's Technology or Computer Use Policies.

If an employee's performance, demeanor, overall attitude, conduct, or work habits become unsatisfactory in the judgment of the University, based on either conduct such as that listed above or conduct in violation of any other University policies or practices, the employee will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal.

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13.24 *Animals on Campus

The University recognizes the important role animals can play in the lives of employees and students. At the same time, certain animals are not suitable companions to bring on campus, and there are people who have fears or allergies associated with certain animals. Therefore, no animals, with the exception of service dogs and animals being used for instructional purposes, are allowed in campus buildings during hours of instruction or normal business operations. Any exceptions to this policy must be approved by the vice president/provost responsible for the operational area where a person seeks to have an animal inside campus buildings. Refer to Appendix G for definition of roles, responsibilities and processes.

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13.25 *Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) Training Policy

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that protects the privacy of student educational records and establishes rights for students relative to the disclosure of these records.

As a recipient of federal education funding, Seattle University is required to manage educational records consistent with the requirements of FERPA.  All persons employed by the univesity are expected to be aware of and comply with these requirements.   The university provides online FERPA training and all university employees,  including faculty, staff, and students, are required to take this training.  

  • New faculty and staff will be required to take this training during their first two weeks of employment.
  • All student employees will be required to take training as part of the hiring process.
  • Because specific provisions within FERPA change, all employees will be required to retake training every two years.
  • Any individual who violates FERPA will be required to retake training.

A record of individuals who have completed FERPA training will be maintained by the university. Access to administrative computing systems, including Colleague and SUDDS, will be allowed only after completion of FERPA training.

Any questions regarding this policy should be directed to the Office of the Registrar.

13.26 *Workplace Violence

Introduction: 

Seattle University is committed to providing a learning and working environment that is safe for all members of the community. The university will not tolerate violent acts on its campus, at off-campus locations administered by the university, or in its programs. This policy of "zero tolerance" extends not only to actual violent conduct but also to threats, intimidation, and disruption whether by students, faculty, staff, or visitors to the university.

 This policy is intended to guide members of the Seattle University community both in preventing acts of violence and in responding to them when they occur on or in relation to the university's campus.  The Workplace Violence Policy applies to all Seattle University work locations including offices, classrooms, work sites, vehicles, and field locations.

 Definitions:

 Violent or threatening behavior can include, but is not limited to:

  •  Physical acts of violence
  • Using or brandishing firearms, explosives, knives, or other types of weapons
  • Threatening to use a weapon
  • Verbally threatening to harm another person or destroy property
  • Sending harassing email messages, letters, or notes
  • Making harassing telephone calls
  • Using threatening, intimidating, or abusive language and/ or gestures
  • Exhibiting behaviors such as stalking or similarly harassing behaviors

 Violence in the workplace includes relationship violence that intrudes into the workplace, endangering a person in the relationship or others in the workplace. Relationship violence is physically, sexually, and/or psychologically abusive behavior that a household member or dating partner uses to establish and maintain control over another person.

 Imminent Threat: Actual violent behavior or a situation where it appears violent behavior is likely to take place such as a verbal altercation that appears to be escalating.

 Potential Threat: When you believe a situation has the potential for becoming violent over time because it exhibits one or more of the violence warning signs.

 Orders for Victim Protection: Orders for Victim Protection include the following types of court orders:

  • Protection Order
  • No Contact Order
  • Restraining Order
  • Anti-Harassment Order

 Policy Statement:

Verbal threats, threatening behavior, or acts of violence by an employee against other employees, students, vendors, or campus visitors will not be tolerated. Violation of this policy will result in appropriate disciplinary action, including potential dismissal. Arrest and criminal prosecution by off-campus authorities is also possible.

 Threats or acts of violence will be taken seriously and will be investigated promptly by the University.  Employees who make substantial threats, exhibit threatening behavior, or engage in violent acts on university property will be removed from the campus as quickly as safety permits. 

It is a condition of employment that the university may take all immediate action that it determines is necessary to prevent or mitigate a perceived threat of violence or an act of violence or threatened violence.  Administrative actions, such as stay-away orders, interim leave of absence, work at home, and interim suspension of students, may be taken by the university with or without notice or cause.  Policies and procedures for discipline are not applicable where the university takes administrative action for safety purposes. 

 The University will not permit retaliation against anyone who, in good faith, brings a complaint of campus violence or serves as a witness in the investigation of a complaint of campus violence.

Procedures:  

Procedures have been established that university faculty and staff must follow to report incidents of violence in the workplace, or to report concerns about situations that could become violent. These procedures have been created to ensure that incidents receive an appropriate and timely response.

On Campus Incident Reporting: To report an Imminent Threat or Potential Threat happening on campus: Immediately contact the Department of Campus Public Safety (206-296-5911) or use one of the “Blue Light” emergency phones located around campus or use the Public Safety walk-up window in the University Services Building.  All three of these resources are available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.

 Off-Campus Incident Reporting (including areas on the perimeter of campus): To report an Imminent Threat or Potential Threat happening off campus: Immediately call 911, then contact the Department of Campus Public Safety (206-296-5911) or use one of the “Blue Light” emergency phones located around campus or use the Public Safety walk-up window in the University Services Building.

 To report anOrder for Victim Protection: Immediately contact the Department of Campus Public Safety (206-296-5911) or use one of the “Blue Light” emergency phones located around campus or use the Public Safety walk-up window in the University Services Building.  All three of these resources are available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.

 In all cases, employees who receive any complaint or concern involving violence, including knowledge of an order for victim protection must bring the matter to the immediate attention of the Department of Campus Public Safety (206-296-5911).

 The Department of Campus Public Safety will investigate all complaints of violence.  Public Safety will collaborate with the Office of Human Resources in instances where an employee is suspected of committing workplace violence.  Students who engage in such behavior will be addressed in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct and associated protocols.  Local law enforcement may also be involved in responding to and investigating workplace violence incidents as appropriate.

 Related Policies and References:

Campus Public Safety “What to Do” Emergency Guide

Human Resources Policy Manual section 13.22 Professional Conduct and Ethical Behavior

Human Resources Policy Manual section 13.23 Guidelines for Appropriate Conduct

Student Code of Conduct

 

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Resources

Federal Drug-Free Work-Place Act of 1988: http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/demand/dfmanual/09df.htm
Preventing Sexual Harassment: http://www.newmedialearning.com/psh/seattleu/
FERPA training: https://webapps.seattleu.edu/ferpa/Default.aspx
Washington State Indoor Clean Air Act: http://www.epa.gov/oar/oaq_caa.html

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

Appendix A: Worker's Compensation

In compliance with state law, the University carries worker's compensation insurance for all employees for injuries and illnesses incurred on the job.

Policies

  1. Procedures for Reporting On-the-Job Injury/Illness
    1. An on-the-job accident, injury or serious near-miss must be reported immediately to the supervisor. Failure to do so can result in the employee's claim being delayed or denied. The supervisor notifies Campus Public Safety, which investigates the accident and arranges for professional medical assistance, if needed.
    2. The employee is sent to a medical provider if professional medical assistance is needed.
    3. The employee will be asked to complete Form 801 (Employer's Report of Occupational Injury or Illness) and his physician will return it to HR for further processing.
    4. The employee must report to work no later than the next scheduled workday if the employee's physician releases the employee to return to work for temporary, light duty, part-time or regular duties. The employee must inform his supervisor about the health condition and any physical restrictions. If the physician determines that the employee is unable to perform any kind of work, it is the employee's responsibility to inform HR of the health condition. HR will follow-up, as appropriate.
    5. The employee must call the supervisor at a predetermined time to report her status if she is off work for more than three (3) calendar days. The employee must call in weekly until she is able to return to work. The employee may be required to take certain forms to the physician on follow-up appointments and must return the completed forms to the supervisor.
    6. Any bills and any questions about claims are directed to the State of Washington, Department of L&I.
  2. Procedures for Documenting Time Loss
    1. When an employee sustains a job-related disability and the period of disability extends from the fourth (4th) workday, worker's compensation benefits will be paid by the Department of Labor and Industry (L & I). An employee can use sick leave for the first three (3) days of a job-related injury or illness.
    2. The Department of L & I will begin payments based on family status and the employee's regular rate of pay if the job-related disability exceeds four (4) days but is less than fourteen (14) days.
    3. The Department of L & I will pay retroactive benefits for the first four (4) days of initial disability if the job-related disability exceeds fourteen (14) days. The employee is responsible for reimbursing the University any payments from the Department of L & I if the University has already made payments through the sick leave benefit.
    4. The University pays the employee for the balance of the day on which the injury occurs, even if the employee does not return to work.

Resources

Washington Industrial and Safety Health Act (WISHA): http://www.lni.wa.gov/

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

Appendix B: ERISA

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) is a federal law that covers the following University plans: health care, life insurance, disability insurance, and the retirement plan. An employee is entitled to review and receive information about the University's plans (see Sections 5.2 through 5.8 for plan outlines). Plan information is provided to employees in their benefits information packet.

ERISA ensures that employees receive benefits promised by their employers and that tax-favored pension plans do not favor the highest-paid employees in the way benefits are provided.

ERISA imposes duties on the people who are responsible for the operation of the employee benefit plans and creates rights for plan participants. The administrators of the employee plan, called "fiduciaries" of the plan, have a duty to do so prudently and in the interest of employees and other plan participants and beneficiaries. No one, including an employer, may fire employees or otherwise discriminate against employees in any way to prevent them from obtaining welfare benefits or exercising their rights under ERISA. If an employee's claims for welfare benefits are denied in whole or in part, the employee must receive a written explanation of the reasons for the denials. Employees have the right to have the plan reviewed and reconsidered, in light of their claims.

There are steps employees can take to enforce their ERISA rights. For instance, if an employee requests materials from the plan and does not receive them within thirty (30) days, he may file suit in a federal court. In such a case, the court may require the Plan Administrator to provide the materials and pay employees up to $100 a day until the materials are received unless the materials were not sent because of reasons beyond the control of the Plan Administrator.

Employees may file suit in a state or federal court if they have a claim for benefits that is in whole or in part denied or ignored. Employees may seek assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor or they may file suit in a federal court if plan fiduciaries misuse the plan's money, or if employees are discriminated against for asserting their rights. The court decides who should pay court costs and legal fees. The court may order the person being sued to pay these costs and fees if employees are successful. If employees lose, the court may order them to pay these costs and fees. Employees should contact the nearest area office of the U. S. Department of Labor with any questions about the plan.

ERISA provides that all plan participants are entitled to:

  1. Examine without charge all plan documents at the Plan Administrator's office. This includes insurance contracts and copies of all documents filed by the plan with the U. S. Department of Labor, such as detailed annual reports and plan descriptions.
  2. Obtain copies of all plan documents and other plan information on written request to the Plan Administrator; the Plan Administrator may charge a reasonable amount for the copies.
  3. Receive a summary of the plan's annual financial report (the Plan Administrator is required by law to furnish each participant with a copy of this annual report summary)

Resources

Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA): http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/health-plans/erisa.htm

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

Appendix C: Sexual Harassment

1. Definition of Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment, whether between people of different sexes or the same sex includes, but is not limited to, unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other behavior of a sexual nature when:

  1. Submission to such conduct is made implicitly or explicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or participation in an educational program;
  2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for personnel decisions or for academic evaluation or advancement; and/or
  3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or educational environment

2. Examples of Conduct that May Constitute Sexual Harassment

Conduct and behaviors prohibited by the University's Sexual Harassment Policy include, but are not limited to:

  1. Physical assault;
  2. Direct or implied suggestions that submission to or rejection of sexual advances is a condition of or affect decisions regarding such matters as an individual's employment, promotion, work assignments or status, salary, academic standing, grades, receipt of financial aid, or letters of recommendation;
  3. Direct propositions of a sexual nature and/or subtle pressure for sexual activity that are unwanted and that unreasonably interfere with a person's work or academic environment;
  4. A pattern of conduct (not legitimately related to the subject matter of a course) that causes discomfort or embarrassment, including:
    1. Verbal or written comments of a sexual nature;
    2. Sexually explicit statements, questions, jokes, or anecdotes;
    3. Touching, patting, hugging, brushing against a person's body, or repeated or unwanted staring;
    4. Remarks about sexual activity, experience, or orientation;
    5. Remarks of a sexual nature about an individual's body, clothing, or physical appearance; and/or
    6. Display of inappropriate sexually oriented materials in a location where others can see it: when such conduct, comments, actions, or materials unreasonably interfere with a person's work or academic environment;
     
  5. Intentionally making performance of the employee's job or student's academic work more difficult because of that employee's sex or sexual orientation; and/or
  6. Preferential treatment or promises of preferential treatment for submitting to sexual conduct.

Special note: Physical assaults of a sexual nature, or attempts to commit these acts, are forms of unlawful harassment and are criminal acts under the Washington law. Incidents of this nature should be reported to Campus Public Safety and/or the police.

3. Retaliation

Individuals who report a complaint of alleged sexual harassment may not be reprimanded or discriminated against in any way for initiating an inquiry or complaint in good faith. Further, the laws pertaining to sexual harassment make it unlawful to retaliate or to take reprisal in any way against anyone who has articulated a concern about sexual harassment or has participated or cooperated in the investigation of a complaint.

4. Consensual Relationships

  1. Relationships that might be appropriate in other circumstances have inherent dangers when they occur between any employee and his supervisor. These relationships are unethical and unprofessional and are therefore prohibited by the University.
  2. A supervisor can have a decisive influence on a staff member's career at the University through wage increases, promotion, and the like. Although sexual harassment most often occurs in situations of power differential between the persons involved, the University recognizes that sexual harassment may occur between persons of the same University status.
  3. No person involved in a consensual relationship shall have direct responsibility for evaluating the employment or for making decisions regarding the promotion or compensation of the other party to the relationship. If an allegation of sexual harassment occurs, the University is less sympathetic to a defense based on consent when the facts establish that a professional power differential existed within the relationship. These relationships are subject to concerns about the validity of consent, conflicts of interest, and unfair treatment of other employees. These relationships undermine the atmosphere of trust essential to the employment relationship.
  4. A romantic or amorous relationship between a member of the faculty and a student for whom the faculty member has instructional, advising, or other professional responsibility is unethical and unprofessional and, therefore, is prohibited. This judgment arises from the recognition that in the faculty-student relationship there is always an element of superiority or power. Faculty members have a professional responsibility not to abuse the power with which they are entrusted because of their faculty position. A romantic or amorous relationship between a faculty member and a student readily creates the impression of favoritism or preferential treatment and thus may adversely affect other students. Such conduct by a faculty member is not simply a personal matter; it is also a matter of institutional concern and responsibility. The oversight of this policy rests with the deans and the Provost.
  5. A romantic or amorous relationship between a staff member and a student for whom the staff member has instructional, advising, or other professional responsibility is unethical and unprofessional and, therefore, is prohibited. This judgment arises from the recognition that in the staff-student relationship there is always an element of superiority or power. Staff members have a professional responsibility not to abuse the power with which they are entrusted because of their staff position. A romantic or amorous relationship between a staff member and a student readily creates the impression of favoritism or preferential treatment and thus may adversely affect other students. Such conduct by a staff member is not simply a personal matter; it is also a matter of institutional concern and responsibility. The oversight of this policy rests with the area Vice President and the Provost.

5. Responsibilities

  1. University administrators, deans, department heads, and supervisors have the responsibility of preventing and eliminating sexual harassment within the areas they oversee.
  2. If administrators, deans, department heads, or supervisors know sexual harassment is occurring, receive a complaint of sexual harassment, or obtain other information indicating possible sexual harassment, they should take prompt action to ensure the matter is addressed, even if the problem or alleged problems is not within their area of oversight. Faculty members likewise, should inform an appropriate administrator if they have reason to believe sexual harassment is occurring.

6. University Resources for Students and Employees

All employees of the University have a number of resources available to discuss sexual harassment concerns or questions. Available resources include, but are not limited to:

  1. Vice President for HR & University Services/Equal Opportunity Officer ("VP for HR/EOO")
  2. Student Counseling Center
  3. Office of the Vice President for Student Development
  4. Wismer Women's Center
  5. Campus Ministry Office

These resources afford an employee the opportunity to discuss a concern or situation and the available options. These resources also offer employees the opportunity to gain information about the University's formal sexual harassment complaint procedures.

7. Education and Training

Educational efforts are essential to sustain a University environment that is as free as possible of sexual harassment, that fosters respect for all individuals, and that observes high standards of conduct in consensual relationships. The primary goals to be achieved through education include:

  1. Ensuring that all individuals are aware of their rights;
  2. Notifying individuals of prohibited behaviors;
  3. Informing parties of the proper way to address complaints of violations of this policy; and
  4. Maintaining a community awareness of the problems this policy addresses.

The VP for HR/EOO arranges regular training sessions for employees about prevention of sexual harassment. The intent of this training is to maintain an academic and work environment free of harassment. An environment that is free from sexual harassment provides for the opportunity for each to reach her potential in the performance of her educational pursuits or assigned position. A sexual harassment pamphlet is published and distributed to the University community on a regular basis. A copy is provided to every employee on hire and available in appropriate campus centers and offices. A copy of the University's sexual harassment policy is placed in the Faculty Handbook as a reference for faculty members. A copy of this policy is readily available in campus centers and offices and is also posted at the University's internal and external web sites.

A letter is issued annually from the Office of the VP for HR/EOO to the campus community, reminding employees and students of the contents of the University's sexual harassment policy.

8. Filing a Complaint of Sexual Harassment

  1. Direct reporting of alleged harassment by offended party: Any employee or student may make a formal report of alleged sexual harassment to the VP for HR/EOO. If the complaint involves the Office of the VP for HR/EOO, the complainant believes that the VP for HR/EOO may have a conflict in the matter, or if for any reason the individual is uncomfortable coming to the VP for HR/EOO, the reporting can be directed to the Executive Vice President. The respective Vice President and dean are notified of the receipt of a complaint.
  2. Reporting by administrators, deans, department heads and supervisors: An individual in a leadership position with personal knowledge that sexual harassment is occurring, or who receives a complaint of sexual harassment or obtains other information indicating possible sexual harassment, should take prompt action to document the matter and report it to the VP for HR/EOO.
  3. Reporting by faculty members: Any faculty member with personal knowledge that sexual harassment is occurring, or who receives a complaint of alleged sexual harassment or obtains other information indicating possible sexual harassment, should document that information and provide it to his respective department chair or dean, or report the matter directly to the VP for HR/EOO.

In many instances, informal discussion can be useful in resolving perceived instances of harassment or unprofessional conduct. Problems are sometimes easier to resolve when an informal atmosphere encourages people to identify the difficulty, talk it out, and agree on how to deal with it. Even where a formal complaint may have been submitted, the VP for HR/EOO can often assist an individual in bringing about an informal satisfactory resolution without a formal investigation. The University retains the right to investigate or address concerns even without a formal complaint or to initiate an investigation of its own volition.

9. Investigation Procedures

  1. The nature and the scope of the formal investigation depends in part on the nature of the complaint.
  2. The VP for HR/EOO documents all of the details as reported by the complainant.
  3. In investigating a formal complaint of alleged sexual harassment, every possible effort shall be made to ensure the confidentiality of both the complainant and the alleged offending party.
  4. The VP for HR/EOO conducts an investigation and gathers necessary information to establish whether there is a reasonable basis for believing that the alleged violation of this policy has occurred.
  5. This investigation includes an interview with the alleged offending party, wherein he is informed of the nature of the complaint, the identity of the complainant, and the reported information surrounding the allegation. The investigation affords the alleged harasser the full opportunity to respond to the allegations.
  6. In conducting the investigation, the VP for HR/EOO may interview and/or obtain written statements from other persons believed to have pertinent factual knowledge.

10. Complaint Resolution and Corrective Action

  1. Every complaint of sexual harassment is considered on its own merits. Based on the merits of the complaint and the findings, the University takes whatever corrective/disciplinary action it considers appropriate.
  2. Where sexual harassment is found, steps are taken to assure the harassment stops immediately. The VP for HR/EOO monitors corrective action to assure compliance.
  3. Possible outcomes of the investigation are: (a) an informal resolution of the complaint, (b) a determination that the allegations are not warranted or cannot be substantiated; (c) a negotiated resolution of the complaint; or (d) institution of formal corrective action or discipline, as described in item "e." below.
  4. Findings of sexual harassment: If the VP for HR/EOO concludes that there is a reasonable basis for believing that the alleged violation of this policy has occurred appropriate corrective action is recommended. Such action may include, but is not limited to, any of the following: reprimand, suspension, transfer, dismissal, or termination. The University may require an individual to be counseled in appropriate behaviors and the University reserves the right to require training in appropriate behaviors.
  5. Except as specifically modified by other provisions of this policy, formal disciplinary and corrective action involving allegations of:
    1. Violations of this policy by faculty members are the responsibility of the Provost and are governed by the University's Faculty Handbook.
    2. Violations of this policy by staff members are the responsibility of the appropriate Vice President and are governed by University policies and procedure for discipline and dismissal of staff.
     

11. Appeal of Determination of the Complaint

If either party is not satisfied with the resolution or determination of the complaint, that party may file a written appeal with the VP for HR/EOO or the Executive Vice president. The appeal must be filed within ten (10) working days of the determination. The VP for HR/EOO or the Executive Vice president makes a decision on the appeal of the determination within thirty (30) days of receipt, and notifies the parties in writing of that final determination.

12. Appeal of Corrective Action or Discipline

An appeal to corrective action or discipline on the basis of sexual harassment is handled according to the applicable procedures outlined above. In addition to internal disciplinary procedures, certain matters may be referred for legal action (either civil or criminal) by either the complainant or the University.

13. Protection of All Involved Individuals

  1. To the extent that it is practical, the complainant and the alleged offender are informed of steps taken during the investigation.
  2. All reasonable action is taken to assure that the complainant, the alleged offender and those participating in the complaint or investigative process suffer no retaliation as a result of their involvement in the process.
  3. At the time an investigation begins, whether as part of an informal procedure or a formal procedure, the accused is informed of the allegations, the identity of the complainant, and the facts surrounding the allegations. In an informal procedure, however, the identity of the complainant may be kept confidential if, in the judgment of the VP for HR/EOO, doing so is in the best interest of the complainant and does not hamper the ability of the accused to respond to the allegations.

14. Sanctions for a False Complaint

A complainant who is intentionally dishonest in making an allegation of sexual harassment, or who makes a complaint maliciously, is subject to University disciplinary procedures, according to applicable disciplinary guidelines (Faculty Handbook, University policies, or student policies.) Reasonable steps may also be taken to restore the reputation of the accused if it was damaged.

15. Sexual Harassment Complaints Filed with External Agencies

The University's intention is that through these procedures any complaints are resolved internally except where criminal activity is involved. An aggrieved individual may also file a complaint with federal and state agencies, such as:

Washington State Human Rights Commission
Melbourne Tower, #291
1511 Third Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 464-6500
 

U.S. Department of Education
Office for Civil Rights
915 Second Avenue, Room 3310
Seattle, WA 98174
(206) 220-7900
 

U.S. Department of Labor
Office of Federal Contract
Compliance Programs
71 Stevenson St., Suite 1700
San Francisco, CA 94105
(415) 848-69698
 

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Federal Office Bldg.
909 First Avenue, #400
Seattle, WA 98104-1061
(206) 220-6883
 

Individuals who witness or are the victim of a sexual assault or related criminal activity should report the matter to Campus Public Safety or the Seattle Police Department.

Resources

Sexual Harassment: http://www.newmedialearning.com/psh/seattleu/ 

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

Appendix D: Disaster Emergency Plans

1. Emergency Evacuation Plan of a Campus Building:

  1. Evacuate whenever a fire alarm sounds, a Campus Public Safety Officer informs you to evacuate, or Campus Public Safety issues a written notice advising all persons to evacuate the building. Building personnel should ensure other building occupants are aware of the evacuation request and help all building occupants to leave.
  2. Proceed calmly to the nearest fire exit. While exiting close all doors and turn out all lights if possible. Do not attempt to use elevators.
  3. Exit the building at the base of the fire stairway. Move to the nearest campus mall and proceed 300 feet away from the building. In adverse weather, building occupants can proceed to the first floor of the Lemiux Library, which is open twenty-four (24) hours a day.

2. Disabled Occupants

If a disabled occupant is unable to exit a building unassisted, building personnel should assist the individual(s) to the nearest fire exit landing. Telephone Campus Public Safety at 5-911 or send a runner to Campus Public Safety at the University Services Building and advise the location of the disabled occupant. Transporting of disabled individuals should be avoided until emergency personnel arrive unless imminent life-threatening conditions exist in close proximity.

3. Campus Wide Evacuation Plan:

  1. Evacuate your building through the nearest fire exit and go to the Campus Evacuation Camp at the East Intramural Field (Championship Field). Register upon arrival so that your welfare is known.
  2. Bring any available first aid kit, keys, needed personal items, medication, eyeglasses, etc. with you to the Campus Evacuation Camp.
  3. Once at the East Intramural Field (Championship Field) Campus Public Safety staff will coordinate the Evacuation Camp.
  4. Do not attempt to leave the campus immediately. Trying to drive and/or walk long distances after a major disaster is most likely futile due to debris and other hazards.

4. During an Earthquake on Campus:

  1. Stay calm; do not panic.
  2. If you are outdoors, go to an open space. Move away from buildings, poles, and power lines.
  3. If you are inside, stay there. Do not run outside.
  4. Move away from the windows and large pieces of glass or mirrors.
  5. Crouch under a sturdy desk or table, or stand in a doorway.
  6. Do not use the elevator.
  7. Expect fire alarms and/or sprinkler systems to activate.

5. After an Earthquake on Campus:

  1. Before moving, check to see if you are injured. Look for any smoke or fire.
  2. Check people around you for injuries. If there are any serious injuries, do not attempt to move the person unless he is in immediate danger.
  3. Do not light a match or lighter, as there may be gas leaks. If possible, make sure all electrical items are shut off.
  4. Use telephones to report emergencies to 5-911 (if on campus), or send a runner to report injuries and fire to Campus Public Safety at the University Services Building.
  5. Exit building through fire exit ways.
  6. Watch for falling objects, broken sidewalks, and any dangerous conditions.

6. What Can You Do?

  1. Be as prepared as possible. Know what to do and where to go if a significant disaster occurs. Assess your office/room for objects that may fall and place heavy items down low.
  2. Prepare or purchase a disaster kit for your personal welfare.
  3. Take training courses in CPR and First Aid.
  4. Establish an out-of-state contact you can call so family and friends can make sure you are okay. Long distance numbers are more available during disasters than local numbers.

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

Appendix E: Section 504/ADA Policy and Appeal Procedure

Policy Statement

It is the policy of Seattle University that no qualified person shall, on the basis of disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination in any job, facility, program or activity provided by the University. Discrimination against a qualified person with a disability undermines the mission and values of the University and affects the careers, educational experience, and well-being of students, staff, administrators, and faculty. Each and every member of the University community has the responsibility to ensure that this policy becomes a functional part of the daily activities at the University.

SUMMARY OF APPLICABLE LAW AND REGULATIONS

1. Section 504: The Rehabilitation Act

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act provides: "No otherwise qualified individual with handicaps in the United States . . . shall, solely by reason of her handicap, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." 29 U.S.C. § 794.

The Section 504 compliance standards apply to the following categories of University programs or activities: (1) admissions and recruitment; (2) treatment of students; (3) academic adjustments; (4) housing; (5) financial and employment assistance to students; and (6) nonacademic services. 34 C.F.R §§ 104.41-104.47.

2. Section 503: The Rehabilitation Act

Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act prohibits discrimination against qualified handicapped employees working on federal contracts. It also requires institutions holding federal contracts to take deliberate action to hire and promote known handicapped individuals.

3. The Americans With Disabilities Act ("ADA")

The ADA provides a comprehensive statutory and regulatory approach to eliminating discrimination against qualified persons with disabilities.

Title I of the ADA applies to employment. Any "qualified individual with a disability" is entitled to reasonable accommodation under the ADA, provided the individual, "with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the employment position that such individual holds or desires," (42 U.S.C. § 12111(8)), and provided that the accommodation does not create an "undue hardship" for the employer. 42 U.S.C. § 12111(10)(A).

Title III of the ADA applies to public accommodations and services operated by private entities such as the University. The general rules of Title III provide: "No individual shall be discriminated against on the basis of disability in the full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, or accommodations of any place of public accommodation by any person who owns, leases, or operates a place of public accommodation." 42 U.S.C. § 12182(a).

4. Qualified Individual With a Disability

The regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Education and under the ADA broadly define a person with a disability as any person who: (1) has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities, including among others, walking, caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, and working; (2) has a record of a disability; or (3) is perceived to be disabled.

In the case of employment, to be "qualified" a person with a disability must meet the legitimate job requirements and be capable of performing the essential functions of the job in question, with or without reasonable accommodation. In the case of services, extracurricular activities, and academic programs, a qualified individual with a disability is one who meets the essential eligibility or technical requirements for the receipt of services or for participation in the program or activity, with or without reasonable modifications to rules, policies, practices, or the provision of auxiliary aids and services.

Important Note: Section 504 and the ADA do not require the University to make academic adjustments or program modifications that are essential to the program of instruction or that fundamentally alter the nature of the program, goods, or services, or that create an undue burden for the University. In addition, the University will not provide attendants, individually prescribed devices, readers for personal use or study, or other devices or services of a personal nature.

5. Procedures for Requesting Accommodation

The University will respond to and evaluate all requests to make a reasonable accommodation, modification or adjustment in University facilities, programs, policies, jobs, services and activities to ensure equal opportunity for qualified individuals with disabilities. The "qualified individual" criterion and the "reasonable accommodations" requirement are interrelated. Therefore, each request for accommodation will be assessed individually, based on relevant circumstances and factors. It is the responsibility of the individual seeking an accommodation to identify the disability and to provide documentation of the disability at his own expense. The documentation must be fairly recent, must come from an appropriate expert, and must be sufficiently comprehensive.

Any person with a disability who seeks a reasonable accommodation in connection with employment, or who is seeking an academic adjustment, program modification, barrier removal, facilities access, auxiliary aids and services, or other modification or assistance under the ADA or Sections 503/504, is encouraged to seek assistance as outlined below:

A. Accommodations Relating to Student Academic or Educational Programs

A student seeking an academic adjustment, or an auxiliary aid, accommodation, or modification relating to the student's academic or educational programs, including financial aid, admission and recruitment, should contact the Disabilities Services Staff in Student Academic Services to initiate the process. It is the responsibility of the student to provide the University with adequate notice of her disability, to request the particular academic adjustment, auxiliary aid, accommodation or modification, and to provide any necessary medical or other professional verification of a disability-related need for the specific request. Disabilities Services Staff will consult as necessary with appropriate faculty and University officials to determine the appropriate accommodation after considering the student's request or any alternative means of accommodation, their feasibility, and the cost and effect on the academic program and standards.

Students at the School of Law requesting an academic adjustment or an auxiliary aid, accommodation or modification to their academic or educational programs, including financial aid, admissions and recruitment, should contact the Law School Associate Dean for Student Affairs. The student has the responsibility to provide the Law School with adequate notice of his disability, to request the particular academic adjustment, auxiliary aid, accommodation or modification, and to provide any necessary medical verification of a disability-related need for the specific request. The Associate Dean for Student Affairs may consult with faculty and/or the Disabilities Services staff. The Associate Dean for Student Affairs will determine the appropriate accommodation after considering the student's request or any alternative means for accommodation, their feasibility, and the cost and effect on the academic program and standards.

The Provost is the University official with final responsibility for accommodations relating to academic or educational programs.

  • Disabilities Services, Student Academic Services, Loyola Hall 100, (206) 296-5740 (TDD 296-5743)
  • Associate Dean for Student Affairs, School of Law-Sullivan Hall 210H, (206) 398-4307
  • Office of the Provost, Administration Building 104, (206) 296-6160

B. Accommodations Relating to Student Extracurricular Programs and Activities

A student seeking an auxiliary aid, accommodation, or modification to nonacademic programs or activities, such as physical education and athletics; academic or vocational counseling; University sponsored clubs or social organizations; employment assistance; work-study; extracurricular program; or other University activities, has the responsibility to provide the University with adequate notice of her disability, to request the particular auxiliary aid, accommodation or modification, and to provide any necessary medical verification of a disability-related need for the specific request. The student should contact Disabilities Services staff in Student Academic Services to initiate this process. The Disabilities Services staff will consult as necessary with the program or activity director or manager and/or other relevant University officials, who will review the request and reach a decision.

The Vice President for Student Development is the University official with final responsibility for accommodations or modifications involving nonacademic student programs and activities.

  • Disabilities Services, Student Academic Services, Loyola Hall 100, (206) 296-5740 (TDD 296-5743)
  • Associate Dean for Student Affairs, School of Law-Sullivan Hall 210H, (206) 398-4307
  • Office of Vice President for Student Development, Student Union Building 204, (206) 296-6066

C. Accommodation Relating to Employment

Any employee or applicant (including faculty, administration, staff and student staff) seeking an accommodation in connection with employment should first contact a Human Resources Manager for assistance. The employee has the responsibility to provide the University with adequate notice of the disability, to request the particular accommodation, and to provide any necessary medical verification of a disability-related need for the requested accommodation. The Human Resources Manager will consult with the person's supervisor and/or other relevant University officials to determine whether a reasonable accommodation is available that will enable the employee to perform the essential functions of the job. The Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and the Provost are the University officials with final responsibility for accommodations relating to employment.

  • Human Resources Managers: Rianna Building, 206-296-5870, hr@seattleu.edu  
  • Vice President for Human Resources & University Services/Equal Opportunity Officer, Rianna Building, (206) 296-5870, hr@seattleu.edu  
  • Office of the Provost, Administration Building 104, (206) 296-6160 

D. Accommodation Relating to Facilities Access

If the accommodation request relates primarily to barrier removal, facilities or physical accessibility at the University, then the individual should first contact the Office of Residential Services or the Facilities Operations Department (for nonresidential campus facilities). These offices will coordinate with the respective Human Resources Manager, Disabilities Services (Learning Center), the 504/ADA Coordinator, and/or other appropriate University officials who will review the request and reach a decision. The person seeking the accommodation has the responsibility to provide the University with adequate notice of the disability, to request the accommodation, and to provide any necessary medical verification of a disability-related need for the requested accommodation.

If the accommodation request relates to facilities or physical accessibility at the Law School, then the individual should contact the Law School's Associate Dean for Student Affairs. The Associate Dean will coordinate with the respective Human Resources Manager, Disability Services, the ADA Coordinator, Law Center Building Services, and/or other appropriate University officials who will review the request and reach a decision. The person seeking the accommodation has the responsibility to provide the University with adequate notice of the disability, to request the accommodation and to provide any necessary medical verification of a disability-related need for the requested accommodation.

The Vice President for Student Development is the University official with responsibility for housing facilities. The Vice President for Finance and Investments is responsible for all other facilities.

  • Office of Residential Services, Bellarmine Hall 117, (206) 296-6305
  • Facilities Operations, CLMB Building, (206) 296-6999
  • Associate Dean for Student Affairs, School of Law - Sullivan Hall 210H, (206) 398-4307
  • Office of the 504/ADA Coordinator, Office of Human Resources, RINA Building, (206) 296-5870

6. Appeal Procedures

These appeal procedures are intended to provide a means for an individual to appeal a decision or action regarding an accommodation, modification, auxiliary aid, or academic adjustment, or to otherwise make a complaint about discrimination or harassment based on a disability. The University intends that all appeals be processed in a manner that promotes the prompt and equitable resolution of complaints. Therefore, individuals with complaints should bring them to the attention of appropriate University personnel as soon as possible after the action(s) causing the complaint. Upon receipt of an informal or formal complaint, University officials will seek a prompt and timely resolution.

Informal Appeal: An individual is encouraged to resolve concerns about accommodations or modifications by communicating with the concerned parties and suggesting an appropriate resolution. The individual may seek informal discussion, advice and assistance from the Disabilities Services Staff in Student Academic Services, the 504/ADA Coordinator, the respective Human Resources Manager, or the Director of Facilities Operations. The request for an informal review and resolution should be in writing and should be directed to the person whose assistance is being sought.

This informal process may lead to resolution of the matter. If not, the individual may choose to follow the formal complaint process described below or to use complaint procedures with outside agencies. An individual may use the formal procedure without first using the informal procedure.

FORMAL APPEAL

1. Appeals Relating to Accommodations in Academic or Educational Programs and Services

The student must submit a written request for reconsideration with suggestions for an appropriate resolution to the faculty member or University official responsible for the initial decision. If the matter is not resolved at this level, then the student may file a written appeal with the dean of the school involved. The appeal should be as detailed and accurate as possible and should specify the solution or resolution the student is seeking. It should also include all supporting information. The dean may meet with the student and the faculty member or other University officials for further information gathering. The dean will prepare a written determination and recommendation for resolution of the complaint. If the student is not satisfied with the determination of the dean, he may make a written appeal to the Provost. The decision of the Provost or his designee will be final. If the dean made the initial decision, then the student should appeal directly to the Provost.

2. Appeals Relating to Student Extracurricular Programs, Activities and Non-Academic Services

The student must submit a written request for reconsideration with suggestions for an appropriate resolution to the faculty member, advisor, or program manager responsible for the initial decision. If the matter is not resolved at this level, then the student may file a written appeal with the department director involved or the Associate Vice President for Student Development. Law students should file a written appeal directly to the dean of the law school. The appeal should be as detailed and accurate as possible and should specify the solution or resolution the student is seeking. It should also include all supporting information. The department head, the Associate Vice President for Student Development, or the dean of the law school may meet with the student and the faculty member, advisor, or program manager responsible for the initial decision for further information gathering. The department head, the Associate Vice President for Student Development, or the dean of the law school will prepare a written determination and recommendation for resolution of the complaint. If the student is not satisfied with the determination, he may make a final written appeal to the Vice President for Student Development. The decision of the Vice President for Student Development will be final.

3. Appeals Relating to Employment-Related Accommodation

An employee must submit a written request for reconsideration with suggestions for an appropriate resolution to the supervisor or director responsible for the initial decision. If the matter is not resolved at this level, then the employee may file a written appeal with the appropriate vice president or dean, if the employee works in one of the schools or colleges, with a copy to the respective Human Resources Manager. The appeal should be as detailed and accurate as possible and should specify the solution or resolution the employee is seeking. It should also include all supporting information. The area vice president or the dean, in cooperation with the respective Human Resources Manager, may meet with the employee and other involved persons for further information gathering. The vice president or dean, in cooperation with the respective Human Resources Manager, will prepare a written determination and recommendation for resolution of the complaint. If the individual is not satisfied with the determination, he may make a final written appeal to the Vice President of Human Resources & University Services or the Provost. The decision of the Vice President of Human Resources & University Services or the Provost will be final.

4. Appeals Relating to Facilities Access and Barrier Removal

An individual must submit a written request for reconsideration with suggestions for an appropriate resolution to the Director of Facilities Operations. The request should be as detailed as possible and should specify the solution or resolution the individual is seeking. It should also include all supporting information. The Director of Facilities Operations may meet with the individual and other relevant University personnel or officials for further information gathering. The Director of Facilities Operations will prepare written recommendations to the Vice President for Finance and Investments for resolution of the complaint. If the individual is not satisfied with the decision of the Vice President for Finance and Investments, he may file a written appeal to the Provost, whose decision will be final.

5. Appeals Relating to Verbal Harassment or Other Discrimination on Account of Disability

An individual who believes she has been verbally harassed or otherwise discriminated against in any University program or activity on account of a disability, and who has not made a complaint about the incident(s) under any other section of this procedure, may file a complaint by submitting a written description of the alleged harassment or discrimination to a Human Resources Manager. The statement should be as detailed and accurate as possible and should specify the nature of the complaint and the solution or resolution the employee is seeking. The Human Resources Manager may meet with the individual and other involved persons for further information gathering and will prepare a written determination and recommendation for resolution of the complaint. If the individual is not satisfied with the determination and recommendation, she may make a final written appeal to the Provost or to the Vice President of Human Resources and University Services. The decision of the Provost or the Vice President of Human Resources and University Services.

Directory
Title Office Address Phone
504/ ADA Coordinator (Jerry Huffman, Vice President of Human Resources & University Services)      RINA 200 (Rianna Building)296-5870
Associate Provost for Academic Achievement        HUNT 122296-6953
Vice President of Human Resources & University Services/ Equal Opportunity Officer RINA 200 (Rianna Building)296-5870
Associate Dean for Student Affairs (School of Law)SLLH 210H (Sullivan Hall) 398-4307
Associate Vice President for Student Development STCN 204 (Student Center) 296-6060
Dean, Albers School of Business & Economics PIGT 317 (Pigott Building) 296-5699
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences CASY 102 (Casey Building) 296-5300
Dean, College of Matteo Ricci CASY 117E (Casey Building) 296-5405
Dean, School of Education LOYA 500B (Loyola Hall Building) 296-5758
Dean, School of Law SLLH 210J (Sullivan Hall) 398-4301
Dean, School of Nursing GARR 200E (Garrand Building) 296-5676
Dean, School of Science and Engineering EGRN 500A (Engineering Building) 296-5500
Dean, School of Theology & Ministry Hunthausen Hall296-5331
Director of Facilities Operations CHRY (14th & Marion Building) 296-6999
Disabilities Services LOYA 100 (Loyola Hall Building) 296-5744
Learning Center LOYA 100 (Loyola Hall Building) 296-5740
Provost ADMN 104 (Administration Building) 296-6160
Housing & Residence Life BELL 117 (Bellarmine Hall) 296-6305
   
Vice President for Finance and Business AffairsADMN 117 (Administration Building) 296-6150
Vice President for Student Development STUN 204 (Student Union Building) 296-6066
Vice President for University Advancement ADMN 120 (Administration Building) 296-6119
Other Resources Address Phone
Washington State Human Rights Commission Melbourne Tower, #291
1511 Third Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 464-6500
Office for Civil Rights, Department of Education 915 Second Avenue, Room 3310
Seattle, WA 98174
(206) 220-7900
Office of Federal Contract Compliance 71 Stevenson St., Suite 1700
San Francisco, CA 94105
(415) 848-6969
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 909 First Avenue, Suite 400
Seattle, WA 98104-1061
(206) 220-6883
U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division SEA 1111 Third Avenue, Suite 755
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 398-8039

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

Appendix F: Short-Term Disability

1. Application

An employee who has completed twelve (12) continuous months of active employment with the University prior to the onset of a disability is eligible for a benefit under Short-Term Disability. An employee must be disabled for thirty (30) consecutive calendar days, with the Short-Term Disability benefit effective on the 31st calendar day of disability.

To request Short-Term Disability benefits, an employee must submit an application to the University's HR Benefits Office. An employee must also submit with the application a physician's statement defining the date of onset of the disability, the nature of the disability, how the disability prevents the employee from performing regularly assigned essential duties, and the expected recovery date. Application forms are available in the HR Benefits Office.

The University maintains the right to request additional medical statements from the healthcare provider and/or to direct the employee to a second medical evaluation with a healthcare provider selected and paid for by the University.

2. Summary of Benefits

To be eligible to receive Short-Term Disability payments, the disability must occur while the employee is insured under the policy. An employee must first use all accumulated sick leave (paid at 100% of salary) prior to receiving Short-Term Disability payments. An eligible employee is paid a monthly income benefit based on days missed if the employee falls under one of the two following scenarios.

  1. Total Short-Term Disability: The employee is totally disabled by an injury or illness that is not sustained in the course of any occupation or employment for a wage or profit outside the University. The employee is prevented from performing any and every duty pertaining to the University occupation or employment because of the disability. The amount of the Total Short-Term Disability benefit is sixty percent (60%) of salary up to a maximum of $7,000 per month.
  2. Partial Short-Term Disability: The employee is partially disabled by an injury or illness that is not sustained in the course of any occupation or employment for a wage or profit outside of the University. The employee is prevented from performing one (1) or more essential elements pertaining to the University occupation or employment because of the disability. The partial Short-Term Disability benefit is sixty percent (60%) of salary lost when the loss is attributable to the disability. Example: an employee can only work four (4) hours a day because of a partial disability rather than the regularly scheduled seven and a half (71/2) hours. The University pays the employee a regular wage for four (4) hours a day (partial salary). The other three and a half (31/2) hours (partial Short-Term Disability payment) are paid at sixty percent (60%) of the employee's regular wage. Partial salary plus partial Short-Term Disability payment is no more than $7,000 per month.

3. Other Provisions

Benefits are payable for each separate period of disability. A return to work for two (2) full weeks makes an employee eligible for a new benefit period for the same injury or illness. A return to work of less than two (2) full weeks that terminates because of a recurrence of the same disability will be treated as a non-interruption of benefits. A return to work for one (1) day makes an employee eligible for a new benefit period for an unrelated injury or illness. Benefits terminate when an employee is no longer totally or partially disabled, returns to work, retires, or voluntarily terminates employment.

Seattle University
Human Resources Policy Manual

Appendix G: Animals on Campus

Policy Statement

The University recognizes the important role animals can play in the lives of employees and students. At the same time, certain animals are not suitable companions to bring on campus, and there are people who have fears or allergies associated with certain animals. Therefore, no animals, with the exception of service dogs and animals being used for instructional purposes, are allowed in campus buildings during hours of instruction or normal business operations. Any exceptions to this policy must be approved by the vice president/provost responsible for the operational area where a person seeks to have an animal inside campus buildings.

1. Definitions

For the purposes of the policy, the following definitions apply:

1.1 dog owner - anyone who brings a dog to campus.
1.2 dog - a domesticated dog.
1.3 service dog - any guide dog, signal dog, or other dog individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability (as defined by applicable laws and regulations).
1.4 demonstration animal - an animal used by faculty members for teaching purposes (procedures governing the use of lab animals on University property are addressed by the Animal Usage Committee or other appropriate offices and committees).

2. Animals on Campus and in Work Areas

No animal other than a dog, a service dog, or a demonstration animal may be on university property at any time. No dogs, except service dogs, are permitted in classroom buildings during hours of instruction or normal business operations. If a vice president/provost has approved the presence of a dog in a work area during hours of instruction or normal business operations, the dog owner must post a sign in the office area stating that a dog is present. At no time are dogs, except for service dogs, permitted in food service areas such as the Sidebar, the Bottom Line, or the Cherry Street Market. Employees are permitted to have in their work area fish in aquariums holding 10 gallons of water or less.

3. Animals in Residence Halls

The University's Student Handbook, Guide to Residence Hall Living, and related residence life policies govern the presence of animals in University housing.

4. Areas of Campus Where and When Dogs and Demonstration Animals Are Allowed Without Prior Approval

For the purposes of the policy, the following definitions apply:

4.1 Service dogs are authorized throughout campus at all times.
4.2 Dogs are allowed outdoors on the University's property at all times, subject to the requirements of Section 5.
4.3 Dogs are allowed in work areas or campus buildings at times other than hours of instruction or normal business operations, subject to the requirements of Section 5.
4.4 Faculty members may take demonstration animals into classrooms and instructional facilities only for teaching purposes.

5. Dog Owner's Responsibilities

Whenever a dog is on the University's campus in accordance with this policy, the dog must be kept on a leash or under voice control at all times. The dog owner is responsible for caring for the dog, ensuring the safe and responsible behavior of the dog, and preventing the dog from chasing squirrels, birds, or other wildlife on campus. The dog owner is also responsible for cleaning up all messes the dog may make, including properly disposing of waste the dog leaves in outdoor areas of campus (this does not apply to service dogs and their owners).

6. Complaint Resolution

When a concern is raised about an animal on campus, employees and students are encouraged to inform the person with the animal about the university's policy. If a concern is not resolved, employees should consult their immediate supervisor or Human Resources, and students should consult Student Development. Human Resources and Student Development have the authority to make final determinations about individual cases.

7. Information and Questions

Questions about this policy should be directed to Human Resources at ext. 5870. Questions about animals in university housing should be directed to Residence Life and Housing at ext. 6305. Students with questions about animals in other campus buildings should contact Student Development at ext. 6066. Questions about proper cleanup of indoor dog messes should be directed to Campus Support Services at ext. 2639.