Center for Faculty Development
Programs and Events

Faculty Learning Communities

  • 15-16 All 6 FLCs

    In the 2015-16 academic year, the Center for Faculty Development is offering several Faculty Learning Communities, each around a book. The first three learning communities launch in fall 2015 and continue to meet in winter 2016. Three more learning communities will be launched in winter 2016 and will meet throughout the winter and spring.

    What is a Faculty Learning Community?

    A faculty learning community is a group of cross-disciplinary faculty (usually 6–12 people) engaging in an active, collaborative program that meets regularly to support the enhancement of one’s teaching or scholarship (definition adapted from Miami University, OH). Participants in the learning community each pick a focus project and agree to apply the ideas, try out innovations, and report back to the group on what they have learned.

    The Center for Faculty Development provides you with a copy of the book, refreshments, and a designated “host” for your learning community. At each gathering, you’ll discuss key insights from the assigned reading, the progress you’re making on your own project, and questions that are surfacing for you.

    Who can join?

    Any Seattle University faculty member, part-time or full-time, can participate in the program.

    Winter–Spring 2016

    16WQ Creating self-regulated learners FLC

    Faculty Learning Community #4:
    Creating self-regulated learners:
    Strategies to strengthen students' self-awareness and learning skills

    Most students neither know how learning works nor what they have to do to ensure it, to the detriment both of their studies and their development as lifelong learners.

    Linda Nilson’s point of departure in this book is the literature on “self-regulated learning” that tells us that deep, lasting, independent learning requires learners to bring into play a range of cognitive skills, affective attitudes, and even physical activities – about which most students are wholly unaware; and that self-regulation, which has little to do with measured intelligence, can be developed by just about anyone and is a fundamental prerequisite of academic success.

    In this four-session Faculty Learning Community over winter and spring, we will progress through the chapters of the book and will consider how we might embed activities on self-regulation in one of our own courses.

    4a. What's in it for you?

    Over the four sessions, this book and our discussions will help you:

    • Adapt tested activities and assignments to your own courses so that students can progressively reflect on, monitor, and improve their learning skills
    • Integrate self-regulation activities with different course components
    • Prepare for introducing self-regulation activities in the classroom, recognizing that most of us are unfamiliar with these strategies.

    4b. To whom is it suited?

    This community is for any faculty members who wish to enhance their students’ skills in reflection, self-regulation, and lifelong learning.

    4c. How do I register?

    Registration for this learning community is closed.

    16WQ Writing your journal article

    Faculty Learning Community #5:
    Writing your journal article in twelve weeks:
    A guide to academic publishing success

    Do you have a manuscript that is waiting to be revised into an article for academic publication? Perhaps one where you just need a little more structure and nudging to refine and complete it?

    If so, then Wendy Belcher’s Writing Your Journal Article in 12 Weeks is designed for you. It draws on research on such topics as faculty productivity, peer review, and common writing triumphs and failures, as well as on the author’s own experience as a journal editor and award-winning author herself. In the book, Belcher presents a carefully structured process to help you revise your manuscript and produce that final paper ready for submission in just twelve weeks.

    In this four-session Faculty Learning Community over winter and spring, we will progress through the chapters of the book, meeting specific weekly writing goals in between, and producing a final manuscript ready for submission to an academic journal.

    5a. What's in it for you?

    Over the four sessions, this book and our discussions will help you:

    • Demystify the peculiarities of the academic publishing process
    • Target the biggest writing challenges that faculty face
    • Proceed step by manageable step with your own writing project
    • Get published

    5b. To whom is it suited?

    This community is for any faculty member who is ready to REVISE a manuscript—whether a conference paper, unpublished article, chapter, or thesis—so that they can submit it to a suitable academic journal at the end of the 12 weeks. It is particularly suited to those in the humanities and social sciences.

    5c. How do I register?

    Registration for this learning community is closed.

    16WQ Grassroots leadership FLC

    Faculty Learning Community #6 on grassroots leadership:
    Enhancing campus capacity for leadership:
    An examination of grassroots leaders in higher education

    Are you interested in learning how faculty can have a profound influence on the culture of academia by becoming grassroots leaders, but are not sure where to begin? Kezar and Lester’s Enhancing Campus Capacity for Leadership provides a guide for examining the untapped potential of faculty to make a positive difference on their campus environment.

    In this four-session Learning Community over winter and spring, you'll work your way through the chapters in the book so that you have a better grasp of the possibilities for and challenges of grassroots leaders.

    6a. What's in it for you?

    Over the four sessions, in addition to becoming familiar with grassroots leadership as a field of study, you'll learn how to:

    • Create meaningful change
    • Enhance the campus climate
    • Improve relationships among campus colleagues
    • Enhance the student experience

    6b. To whom is it suited?

    This community is for any faculty member who is interested in effective grassroots leadership in a campus context.

    6c. How do I register?

    Registration for this learning community is closed.

    Fall 2015–Winter 2016

    15FQ FLC 1 The New Academic

    Faculty Learning Community #1:
    The New Academic

    Are you interested in learning about the culture of academia and how to be a more effective faculty member, but are not sure where to begin? Shelda Debowski’s The New Academic: A Strategic Handbook provides a guide for those new(-ish) to academe on how to develop an engaging and productive career as a faculty member.

    In this four-session Learning Community over fall and winter, you'll work your way through the chapters in the book so that you feel better prepared to fulfill the various roles—colleague, teacher, scholar, disciplinary expert, public professional—expected of a new academic.

    1a. What's in it for you?

    Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

    • Get started - or reboot - as an academic
    • Make a difference as an effective teacher
    • Build an effective research track record
    • Learn how to engage effectively with the public
    • Advance your career in an academic setting

    1b. Who is it suited to?

    This community is for any faculty member who is in the early stage of her/his academic career.

    1c. What are the dates?

    The two dates in Fall Quarter are:

    • Thu, Oct 29 | 10:15–11:30 | Casey 500
    • Thu, Dec 3 | 10:15–11:30 | Casey 500

    Two further dates for Winter Quarter will be organized once the group’s membership has been established.

    1d. How to register

    Registration for this learning community is now closed.

    15FQ FLC 2 Presentation Zen

    Faculty Learning Community #2:
    Presentation Zen

    Presentations are a mainstay of academia: at conferences, on campuses, and in classes. And as we all know, many of them are bad. Really bad.

    How can we distinguish our presentations from others’ in a way that truly engages our audiences with the ideas we hope to convey? Garr Reynolds’s Presentation Zen provides potential answers and examples, combining simplicity, storytelling, and good design in a way that helps presentations be “appreciated, remembered, and best of all, acted upon.”

    In this four-session Faculty Learning Community over fall and winter, we will progress through the chapters and will each develop or revise an important upcoming presentation of our own. We’ll discuss the sticking points and epiphanies we discover along the way as we experiment with the art of creating presentations that work.

    2a. What's in it for you?

    Over the four sessions, this book and our discussions will help you 

    • Take a different – and flexible – approach to creating presentations tailored to their contexts
    • Focus on the story of your message before even thinking about how to present it
    • Devise and design simple visuals that will complement and enrich your ideas, rather than detracting from them
    • Work out how best to connect with and engage your audience during your presentation

    2b. Who is this suited to?

    This community is for any faculty member who has an important upcoming presentation or who simply wishes to take their presentations to a higher level.

    2c. What are the dates?

    The two dates in Fall Quarter are:

    • Tue, Oct 13 | 2:15–3:30 | Casey 517
    • Tue, Nov 10 | 2:15–3:30 | Casey 517

    Two further dates for Winter Quarter will be organized once the group’s membership has been established.

    2d. How to register 

    Registration for this learning community is now closed.

    15FQ FLC 3 Academic Chairs Handbook

    Faculty Learning Community #3:
    The Academic Chair's Handbook

    Are you interested in learning how to be a more effective leader of the faculty, staff, and students in your academic department or program? The authors of The Academic Chair's Handbook(Wheeler et al.) provide a guide for department chairs and program directors to develop a reflective and productive career as a faculty administrator.

    In this four-session Learning Community over fall and winter, you'll work your way through the chapters in the book so that you feel better prepared to fulfill your current role as the leader of your academic unit.

    3a. What's in it for you?

    Over the four sessions, you'll learn how to:

    • Develop a conceptual understanding of the unique roles and responsibilities encompassed by academic leadership
    • Develop the skills necessary to achieve results through working with faculty, staff, students, and other administrators
    • Develop the practice of reflection that enables one to learn from past experiences in order to perfect the art of leadership

    3b. Who is this suited to?

    This community is for any current department chair or program director interested in the process of self-improvement as a faculty leader.

    3c. What are the dates?

    The two dates in Fall Quarter are:

    • Fri, Oct 30 | 1:00–2:15 | Hunthausen 150
    • Tue, Dec 8 | 11:45–1:15 | Hunthausen 150

    Two further dates for Winter Quarter will be organized once the group’s membership has been established.

    3d. How to register 

    Registration for this learning community is now closed.