University Core Curriculum
Core FAQs

Core FAQs

  • Will my AP credits count toward the Core?
    Transfer students—with DTA and without?
    Will my Running Start credits (for Washington students) count?
    How many global challenges courses do I need? Which ones?
    Can I take Core classes during study abroad?
    Is there a foreign language requirement?
    How many Core classes will I need to take?
    Am I required to take the new core courses in sequence?
    What are the main advantages of the new core?

    Will my AP credits count toward the Core?

    AP and IB credits can be used to fulfill four Core courses: Academic Writing Seminar, Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning, Creative Expression and Interpretation, and Religion in a Global Context. Official policies are available on the Office of the Registrar website under Academic Policies.

    Can I transfer credits from another institution toward SU’s Core requirements?

    Yes. Some, but not all, of the University Core courses can be fulfilled through transfer courses. Which courses can be fulfilled depends on how many credits a transfer student has earned prior to matriculating at Seattle University, which specific courses they have completed, and whether they have received a transferable Associate of Arts degree. Students who have completed a transferable AA degree will receive the most credit towards Core requirements.
    For comprehensive information please see the University Core Curriculum Policy 2012- 01 on the Office of the Registrar, Academic Policies webpage.

    Once a student has matriculated at Seattle University only the following courses can be transferred from accredited domestic institutions:

    UCOR 1100 Academic Writing
    UCOR 1200 Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
    UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Understanding
    UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context
    Students transferring from another Jesuit institution may petition to the Core Director regarding courses in Module II

    Students transferring with fewer than 36 credits

    The following courses may be transferred to satisfy Core based on course content:

    UCOR 1100 Academic Writing
    UCOR 1200 Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
    UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Understanding
    UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context

    Students Transferring with 36-89 credits prior to first enrollment at SU

    A maximum of courses, those in Module I and UCOR 3100, can be transferred to SU. The following courses may be transferred to satisfy Core based on course content:

    UCOR 1100 Academic Writing
    UCOR 1200 Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
    UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Understanding
    UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context

    Transfer courses can be used to satisfy inquiry seminars in Module I based on subject area:

    UCOR 1400-Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities: any acceptable course in English literature (except composition courses), history, philosophy, theology, non-performance based fine art courses (art history, music appreciation or history, drama history, etc.), humanities, communication/speech/journalism (except journalism writing courses)
    UCOR 1600-Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences: any acceptable course in anthropology, administrative justice/criminal justice, economics, geography, government/political science, psychology, or sociology
    UCOR 1800-Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences any acceptable course that includes a lab or field research component in biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, geology, general science, but not computer science.

    Note: Modern Language and ASL classes do not fulfill Module I.

    Students Transferring with 90 credits prior to first enrollment at SU, but no transferrable degree

    A maximum of 40 credits University Core credits can be satisfied in transfer. Module I can be transferred according to the rules listed above. One Global Challenge course specified by the student’s major department may be satisfied via categorical transfer:

    UCOR 3400-Humanities and Global Challenges: any acceptable course in English literature (except composition courses]), history, philosophy, theology, non-performance based fine art courses (art history, music appreciation or history, drama history, etc.), humanities, communication/speech/journalism (except journalism writing courses)
    UCOR 3600-Social Science and Global Challenges: any acceptable course in anthropology, administrative justice/criminal justice, economics, geography, government/political science, psychology, or sociology
    UCOR 3800-Natural Sciences and Global Challenges: any acceptable course in biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, geology, general science, but not computer science

    1 Global Challenge course, specified by the student’s major department must be taken at SU.

    UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context is waived.

    Students Transferring with 90 credits prior to first enrollment at SU, with a transferrable AST degree.

    A maximum of courses in Module I can be transferred. The 15 credits in humanities and social science courses selected by these students to satisfy general education AS-T degree requirements at the community college will be considered equivalent to Seattle University Core requirements using the broadest possible guidelines towards satisfying Module I inquiry seminars.

    UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context is waived.

    One Global Challenge is waived according to departmental requirements.

    Students Transferring with 90 credits prior to first enrollment at SU, with a transferrable DTA degree (See Policy 77-01 for Direct Transfer Associate Degrees)

    Module I, UCOR 3100 (Religion in a Global Context) and 1 Global Challenges according to departmental requirements are satisfied.

    Second Undergraduate Degree where the first degree is from an accredited US institution.

    Much of the University Core is waived. 3 requirements remain:
    UCOR 2100-Theological Explorations
    UCOR 2900-Ethical Reasoning
    Senior Synthesis/Capstone-3 or more credits in designated major course

    Second Undergraduate Degree where the first degree is from a foreign US institution

    A maximum of 25 credits in Module I and III can be transferred.

    Module I inquiry seminars are waived.
    UCOR 3100 Religion in a Global Context is waived.

    The following courses may be transferred to satisfy Core based on course content:
    UCOR 1100 Academic Writing
    UCOR 1200 Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
    UCOR 1300 Creative Expression and Understanding

    The two Global Challenge courses required for the student’s major may be satisfied by satisfied via categorical transfer as indicated above.

    Will my Running Start credits (for Washington students) count?

    Yes. Running Start credits are treated as transfer credits and may count, depending on which courses were completed and how many credits a student has earned.

    How many global challenges courses do I need? Which ones?

    Every SU student will take the two Global Challenges courses most outside of their major/general area of study. For example, a student seeking a BA in Psychology will take the Humanities and Global Challenges course and the Natural Science and Global Challenges course. A student majoring in Chemistry will take the Humanities and Global Challenges course and the Social Science and Global Challenges course. Students with two degrees or two majors will take the two Global Challenge courses most outside of their primary (first listed) major/degree.

    Can I take Core classes during study abroad?

    Yes. Many courses in Seattle University-approved study abroad programs can count towards the Core. This includes courses offered through Seattle University and courses offered through other institutions offering study abroad programs approved by the SU Education Abroad office. Individual courses need to be approved in advance in order to receive Core credit. Please consult the Education Abroad Office for assistance.

    Is there a foreign language requirement?

    The University Core Curriculum does not have a foreign language requirement. However, some colleges and programs do require proficiency in a language, please refer to the Catalog to view the requirements for your degree.

    How many Core classes will I need to take?

    Students who enter Seattle University as Freshmen will take 12 University Core courses and a capstone course in their major in order to complete a Seattle University Degree. Transfer students may be required to take fewer courses, depending on their transfer status.

    Am I required to take the new core courses in sequence?

    In general, we recommend that students complete the four modules of the University Core in order, but it is not uncommon for there to be some overlap or between the timing of the modules. Some University Core courses have identified prerequisites and must be taken in sequence:

    Course  Prerequisite(s)
    UCOR 2100: Theological Explorations
    UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
    UCOR 2500-Philosophy of the Human Person
     UCOR 1100 Academic Writing Seminar
    UCOR 2900-Ethical Reasoning 
     UCOR 2500 Philosophy of the Human Person
    UCOR 3100-Religion in a Global Context
     UCOR 2100 Theological Explorations
    UCOR 34X0: Humanities and Global Challenges
    75 credits, including:
    UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
    UCOR 14X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Humanities
    UCOR 36X0: Social Sciences and Global Challenges
    75 credits, including:
    UCOR 1200 Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
    UCOR 1300 Creative Expression & Interpretation
    UCOR 16X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Social Sciences
    UCOR 38X0: Natural Sciences and Global Challenges
     75 credits, including:
    UCOR 1200 Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
    UCOR 18X0 Inquiry Seminar in the Natural Sciences

    What are the main advantages of the new core?

    There are several qualities of the new Core that stand out: First, the new Core Curriculum features small, engaging courses built around focused questions that reflect faculty research interests and intellectual passions. Core courses are not designed as broad survey courses. Second, the new curriculum emphasizes global and contemporary issues, preparing students for the world of today and tomorrow. Third, the new Core is firmly rooted in the university’s Jesuit heritage and identity. The new Core Curriculum is also slightly smaller in credit load than the previous requirements, allowing students more flexibility for other academic pursuits.