College of Arts and Sciences
Political Science

Current Student Bulletin

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    For Spring Quarter 2014

    Major advising for Political Science majors is
    ONE WEEK ONLY: February 10-14
    You may make an advising appointment by contacting your advisor.

    Please review your online program evaluation (Academic Evaluation) at least once every quarter. This document displays progress toward your BA Degree, including requirements, major requirements, and general electives.

    The Political Science major requires 65 credits:

    ECON 271 (Macro-Econ): 5 credits
    Four Foundation courses (PLSC 200, 230, 250, 260): 20 credits
    One upper-division course in each field: American Politics,
    Comparative Politics, Theory and Law, International Relations: 20 credits
    Four major elective courses; your choice of courses not used to meet field distribution requirements: 20 credits

    For complete information on the Political Science degrees, including Departmental Honors and Legal Studies Specialization, go to the Catalog

    SPRING QUARTER COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    PLSC 200‐01 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN POLITICS
    1:30‐3:35 TTh    Neil Chaturvedi
    Foundation

    This course introduces students to the American political system. We will examine the theoretical and historical underpinnings of the United States constitution, the political institutions-­‐-­‐ Congress, the Presidency, and the Courts, and the American electorate. We will pay specific attention to American public opinion, elections and voting, and political behavior. Finally, we will scrutinize the role of the American media on the political system. In this course, students should expect to gain an understanding of American politics that is beyond current events in a way that will allow them to understand how and why the political system is the way it is. Given that class discussions will involve applying political science theories to current events, students will be expected to come prepared to class by reading both class assignments as well as remaining current with real­‐world politics.

    PLSC 230‐01 COMPARING NATIONS
    10:55‐12:20 MWF  
    Connie Anthony
    Foundation

    The themes of revolution, industrialization, and democratization will be addressed in reference to the primary conceptual building blocks of the subfield including the state, nation, and political economy. We will embrace a methodical focus on comparative history and look at selected country case studies. This course takes a big-picture view on how countries become politically just, economically affluent, and socially equal.  Adopting a global frame, we will also consider how basic processes of social and economic change (revolution, industrialization, and democratization) are misrepresented in comparisons between north and south.

    PLSC 260‐01 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
    3:40‐5:45 MW    Connie Anthony
    Foundation

    The contemporary debate on where global politics is headed concerns whether globalization will eclipse war, whether established national interest in wealth will Address global economic inequities, and whether today’s society will become so truly global as to become more interested in human rights than in national interest. While we can imagine how we might like these debates to be resolved in the world, to understand what the opportunities are for such a resolution, we will consider: a) major theoretical perspectives in the study of international politics; b) the security dilemma in a world of anarchy; c) economic justice in a rule-­‐based world of the global market; d)human rights issues associated with the economic borderlands and immigration.

    PLSC 300‐01 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS
    10:55‐5:50 TTh     Richard Young
    American Politics

    This course examines the tension between the contemporary human pursuit of constant economic growth and preservation of our physical and biological environments. We examine the current issue of environmental stewardship and study the American political process as a means of achieving environmental protection at the local, national, and global levels of governance.
    Classes will be taught by an informal lecture method; learning is promoted by (1) a service learning requirement and (2) preparing for in-class essays for which the questions are provided at least two weeks in advance. The course is divided into three major sections: (1) understanding the nature and causes of the current ecological crisis, (2) understanding why the American political system is currently unable to solve our environmental problems, and (3) developing a successful political strategy for solving these problems. Students should not take this course if they have taken or plan to take PLSC 480 (“The Human Prospect”) from Dr. Young.

    PLSC 319‐01 LAW, POLITICS, AND SOCIETY
    2:05‐3:30 MWF    Larry Cushnie
    Theory/Law

    What is law? Where might we find it? How does it matter? Is it singular or plural? Broadly, this course will consider various ways that law organizes contemporary social life. More specifically, we will consider how law shapes and enables social interaction and disputing; how law constructs difference among people and their actions; and how law mediates and enforces power relationships.

    PLSC 320-01 LEGAL THEORY
    8:00‐10:05 TTh    Larry Cushnie
    Theory/Law

    This course explores legal theory through the concept of justice using a close reading of western political thought, commentary, and case studies. We discuss touchstone works of justice while considering ethical responses to poverty and outlooks on its place in society. The goal is to determine the relationship between law, politics, economics, ideology, and the written word. Subjects for interrogation include: social responsibility, merit, access, scales of economy, capitalism, and the ethical requirements of both citizens and governments.

    PLSC 322‐01 CIVIL LIBERTIES IN AMERICAN CONSTITUTION
    10:15‐12:20 TTh    Erik Olsen
    Political Theory and Law
     

    The legal, political, and philosophic dimensions of pivotal constitutional cases, with special focus on the “incorporation” or “nationalization” of the Bill of Rights, due process, right of privacy, and freedom of speech and expression.

    PLSC 334‐01 CHINESE POLITICS
    12:30‐1:55 TTh Enyu Zhang
    Comparative
     

    In the context of China’s imperial past and revolutions in the 20th century, this course examines the political institutions, policy-making processes, state-society relations, and some of the most pressing domestic and international consequences of economic and political development in contemporary China.

    PLSC 364‐01 US-LATIN AMERICAN RELATIONS
     1:30‐3:35 TTh    Robert Andolino
    International

    Relations between the countries of the Americas have been marked by tension between Latin America guarding its independence and the US extending its influence in the region. Students explore this tension in US Latin America interactions around themes of autonomy and intervention, drug trafficking and human rights, trade and economic integrations, and inter-American organizations. They also consider the implications of China’s growing influence in the region for relations between Latin America and the United States. 

    PLSC 392‐04 GLOBAL CONFLICT AND COOPERATION
    10:15‐12:20 TTh Yitan Li
    International Politics
     

    This course will address the twin themes of conflict and cooperation and how the two interrelated issues can be resolved through the process of diplomacy. It will introduce some of the major literatures on the causes, strategy, practice, and future possibilities of war and peace. The course examines these problems in terms of the conflict/cooperation dichotomy with an overlay of a three-part framework consisting of force, order, and justice.  The course seeks to enhance empirical, policy, and theoretical knowledge of these themes. 

    PLSC 393‐02 PUBLIC OPINION AND POLITICAL BEHAVIOR
    3:45-5:50    Neil Chaturvedi
     

    Two of the foundations of a representative democracy are the formation of opinions from values and attitudes and the transmission of these opinions to elected officials.  In this course, we will examine how Americans form opinions, what their opinions are, and their ability and effectiveness to communicate these thoughts on their government. This course will draw from elements of psychology, sociology, elections and voting, and media studies, and the art of polling.

    PLSC 459-01 TOPICS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
    1:30-3:35 TTh Erik Olsen
    Theory/Law  Capstone

    In-depth analysis of issues, theories, and debates of contemporary relevance. In the spring, this course will explore the quest for community in contemporary political theory in relation to debates about liberalism, diversity, and globalization.

    PLSC 491-01 RACE, GENDER AND SEXUALITY
    10:15-12:20 TTh Rose Ernst
    American Politics  Capstone

    How do we understand the ways that issues of race, gender and sexuality are interrelated in contemporary U.S. politics? How does our understanding of these political identities change when we consider them as necessarily constitution one another? These questions are central to understanding political dynamics in the United States, and yet we often consider these issues, when we discuss them at all, as separate questions to be answered. We explore the political, social and economic facets of these intersections and how they manifest themselves within and between communities. Therefore, we explore the contours of both domination and resistance within the context of the socially constructed categories of race, gender and sexuality. We will also examine these intersections through the lenses of some of the following issues: the racial origins of feminism, reproductive justice, LGBTQI movements, criminalization of Indigenous women and military sex work and the state.

    PLSC 479‐01 HONORS THESIS FOR SENIORS

    Seniors with a major GPA of 3.5+ may elect a separate Major in Political Science with Departmental Honors, which requires an additional five credits of Political Science. Students enroll in two quarters of reading, research, and discussion, culminating in a lengthy thesis roughly comparable to work in a graduate school seminar.

    PLSC 495‐01 INTERNSHIP
    Days and times to be arranged
    Major Elective    Daniel Dombrowski

    Work experience with advocacy or interest organizations, legislative or executive government at local, state, or national levels. For eligibility rules, formal work agreements, and registration approval, contact Dr. Daniel Dombrowski, ddombrow@seattleu.edu.

    PLSC 496‐01 INDEPENDENT STUDY
    Days and times to be arranged
    Major elective     Requires permission of instructor.

    Independent Study allows students to undertake advanced work on a topic that emerges from previous study or that is not otherwise available in our curriculum. Limited by faculty availability.