SU Voice Alumni Blog
  • A Summer Reflection

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 7/10/2012 02:05:05 PM


    Fr DaveThe most important quality Jesus encouraged his followers to have was the gift of trust and faith. One needed to really believe that Jesus had the power and authority to heal before a miracle could happen.  A few weeks ago on the Seattle University campus we gathered for a lunch to honor the donors and recipients of our student athletic scholarships. Some of the people who attended were members of families who were donating scholarships as well as the student-athletes who were receiving them. One of the donors was a woman whose daughter was a former student at Seattle University, and a member of the women’s tennis team. When she was in London for a semester abroad, she was involved in an accident and passed away. After months of recovering from this tragedy, her mother and family were able to move on with hope. 

    I was amazed at her mother's courage and optimism as she spoke with us. Rather than giving up, or remaining angry at God, she’s been able to move forward because of her deep faith and trust in God.   Because of her faith and generous donation, a woman tennis player who may not otherwise be able to attend college is able to study at Seattle University, and be a member of our tennis team. 
    I have another friend who recently had a stroke, and now needs to use a wheelchair. Rather than giving up, he’s been able to accept his condition with God's help and continues to be a great source of encouragement to many know him.
     

    They are people who have really taken to heart Jesus’ invitation to have faith and trust in him.
     Our faith in Jesus begins as a mustard seed, the smallest of all  seeds, or, as a small flame. Through our many life experiences God invites us to allow him to help us keep the flame of our faith burning brightly.  At times our faith burns strong, at other times it's just a spark. When we allow God to come close to us, and when we allow God in, when we honestly share with God where we are, and are able to let go of what we need to let go of, God promises to walk with us and help us to carry our burdens and challenges. As we are strengthened by God's grace, let us continue to be a source of God's light, peace and hope for others. 

    Fr. Dave Anderson, S.J.
    Chaplain for  Alumni

     

    SU's Mission in Action in Rwanda

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 6/5/2012 09:53:52 AM

    GanzaA group of graduating MBA students are proving that Seattle University does indeed create leaders for a just and humane world. 

    The Campaign for the St. Ignatius School in Rwanda is an MBA-student-led effort to support the construction of an elementary and secondary school founded by Fr. Jean Baptiste Ganza, a 2012 graduate of SU’s MBA program. Fr. Ganza, featured in this short video, has been an inspiration inside and outside the classroom. On May 18th, these students put away their calculators and spreadsheets and hosted a graduation party – and in the process raised thousands of dollars for the St. Ignatius School.

    The school will hold 750 students – including Hutus and Tutsis learning together under one roof. Pretty heady stuff when you consider that more than 75& of Rwandans live below the poverty line and children, on average, receive just three years of schooling.

    The Campaign set an original goal of $15,000, but having exceeded that, they now aim to raise $20,000 by graduation. To learn more about the effort, please visit the St. Ignatius School Rwanda Campaign.

    Maria Zazycki,  ‘12

     

    From Dark to Light - Fr. Dave Anderson, S.J., Chaplain for Alumni

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 3/7/2012 10:15:18 AM

    alumni_chaplain_daveOne of the things I'm noticing is that we're gradually receiving more light. As we move toward summer our light will increase several minutes each day and very soon we will have light into the evening hours. Children will be biking, playing baseball and swimming into the evening hours. I'm also noticing that cherry blossoms are blooming on the trees and several flowers are beginning to grow in the gardens around our beautiful Campus. The Christian community around the world is celebrating the season of Lent - a word which means "Spring-season." During the next 40 days we will be in retreat in a similar way that Jesus retreated into the desert for 40 days to be in communion with God.

    As we journey through this season with our Christian sisters and brothers around the world, we're invited by God to be even more engaged with what we are already doing throughout the year - praying, fasting and almsgiving or acts of charity. We're invited to slow down, become more contemplative, and listen to what God is saying to us here and now. We're also invited to sacrifice one thing we enjoy such as snacking … to feel the emptiness … and then to invite God to fill us with God's own love, light and joy.

    And  we're invited to acts of charity … to be co-workers with Jesus in healing our broken world one person at a time. Maybe to serve lunch at a homeless shelter once a week, call a friend with whom we have had a disagreement, or visit an assisted living center. If I can brighten the day of at least one person during these 40 days of Lent, we have made our world a more forgiving and peaceful place.  Mother Theresa once said "do no great things … but do small things with great love." One question I'm asking myself this Lent is "how is God inviting me to grow and become a better person?"  Letting go of resentments, forgiving people with whom I've had a disagreement, not texting or talking on the phone while driving.

    Fr. Dave Anderson, S.J.
    Chaplain for Alumni, Seattle University

    Alumni Living the Mission

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 2/6/2012 11:14:02 AM

    Magislogo20121This month, Magis will begin to feature alumni who are living the mission of Jesuit education in their everyday lives.
    clay nancy
    Mother and son, Nancy and Clay Walton-House are both alumni of Seattle University (1964 and 2007, respectively), and through their participation in Magis programs such as the Justice Education Forum, Alumni Day of Prayer, and Contemplative Leaders in ActionLeadership Program, have developed their understanding of how they want to live the Jesuit values of faith, justice, and leadership in their lives. As Nancy puts it, "Magis inspires and challenges me to live the values and practice the behaviors called for by my faith tradition … [and] calls me to choose justice and the common good whenever possible." To read their full interview, visit Living the Mission online.

    Also, did you and your spouse get married in the Chapel of St. Ignatius on the Seattle University campus? If so, then be sure to "Save the Date" for the Renewal of Wedding of Vows in
    honor of the 15th Anniversary of the Chapel of St. Ignatius on Sunday, April 15, 2012. A vow renewal ceremony will be concelebrated with Fr. Steve Sundborg, S.J. and Fr. Dave Anderson, S.J. followed by a reception with wine and appetizers. Magis and Alumni Relations invite you and your spouse to participate in this unique opportunity!

    Lastly, if you are looking for a faith, justice, or leadership opportunity, then check out the Magis eNewsletter online where you can find out about programs and events for Jesuit-educated alumni living in the Puget Sound!

    A Memo from Magis: Reconnecting with the Jesuit Mission

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 10/28/2011 09:09:54 AM
    Magis2Are you a Seattle University Alumna/us living in the Puget Sound Region looking to connect with other Jesuit-educated alumni? Do you want to serve, lead, or reflect? If so, look no further…
    “What is Magis?” The word Magis (pronounced mah-jis), literally meaning “more” in Latin, was a term used by St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits, and calls us to not necessarily do more, but to be more, deepening who we are in the world.

    Seattle University’s Magis program serves SU alumni, as well as all local Jesuit-educated alumni, helping them to stay meaningfully connected to a larger alumni community who cares about living out the Jesuit educational mission—through deepening their faith, serving for justice, and engaging in leadership. Magis provides programs such as: retreats, speaker series, book groups, community service opportunities, and much more! Programs are free or low cost, and are open to alumni of all backgrounds. By virtue of your Jesuit education, you are part of the greater Jesuit alumni family, and Magis intends to further support you as you continue to grow.

    This month, in partnership with the Office of Jesuit Mission & Identity, Magis invites alumni to participate in an Ignatian 3-Day Silent Retreat from Friday evening, November 11 – Sunday, November 13 at Palisades Retreat Center in Federal Way, WA. To RSVP by Friday, November 4th, or for more information, email Magis.

    Click link below to view Magis’ November eNewsletter filled with information on upcoming programs and events related to the Jesuit Mission! 
     
    Magis eNewsletter.

    Father Lucey Takes the Helm: New AJCU President Q & A

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 7/21/2011 02:28:29 PM
    Fr LuceyThis month Greg Lucey, S.J., took over as president of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities, a network of the nation’s 28 Jesuit institutions. While the role may be new, Father Lucey is no stranger to Jesuit higher education. He most recently served as president of Spring Hill College in Mobile, Ala., from 1997-2009. Previously, he held a number of other key leadership posts, including rector at Marquette University and president of the Jesuit Conference USA. As our more veteran colleagues know very well, Father Lucey also served as vice president for development here at Seattle University from 1978-88. In this role, he spearheaded the first major fundraising campaign in the university’s history, which raised $26 million, surpassing the $20 million goal, to fund the construction of the Bannan Engineering and Casey buildings, the creation of our Quad and other projects and initiatives. 

    Father Lucey was recently on SU’s campus to attend the Jesuit Advancement Administrators Conference, a gathering of advancement and marketing professionals that the university hosted. While here, he also met with President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., who as the new chair of the AJCU board, will be working closely with Father Lucey to move the association forward.


    Mike Thee, SU Marketing & Communications

    Read our Q & A with Fr. Lucey.

     

    Darwin, God & Design

    Posted by Eli Christopher on 10/6/2010 02:36:03 PM

    Darwin God & Design

    Seattle University kicks off its new Catholic Heritage Lecture Series this month by welcoming Kenneth Miller, professor of biology from Brown University, for a presentation on “Darwin, God, and Design: America’s Continuing Problem with Evolution.”  The Catholic Church, Peter Ely, S.J., vice president for Mission and Ministry, points out, has come to recognize the validity of the theory of evolution. “As Catholics, we believe there is a mutually reinforcing relationship between science and religion,” he says. “Catholics see God at work in the evolutionary process even if it seems haphazard and strange. “Intellectual inquiry can be strengthened by faith,” he continues, “and some questions cannot be resolved by reason alone.”

    The lecture series is one component of the Institute for Catholic Thought and Culture, which the university will launch next fall. Ely says the purpose of the institute “is to help the university community appreciate the rich and diverse Catholic intellectual tradition, expressed not only in philosophy and theology, but in literature, arts, science, political theory and every aspect of culture.” In addition to the lecture series, the institute will support and encourage a variety of efforts by SU faculty to bring the Catholic intellectual tradition to the surface and in conversation with issues of the day.

    The first Catholic Heritage Lecture will take place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 28 in Pigott Auditorium. Learn more.