SU Voice Alumni Blog
  • Project on Family Homelessness Recognized Nationally

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 3/23/2011 10:24:28 AM

    Family homelessness studyThe work of SU's Center for Strategic Communications Project on Family Homelessness is singled out as an example of "smart collaborations" in a new report, State of the News Media 2011, from the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism. The report looks at the results from one of the journalism fellowships that we awarded last year, to the Seattle Times:

    Bob Payne, the newspaper’s director of communities, wrote in an e-mail, “Collaborations and grant-funded journalism efforts are really taking off. With newspapers working with less in terms of money and bodies, looking for other ways to get important stories covered is becoming vital. More and more papers are dedicating time to research aimed at smart collaborations and grant applications.”

    The Times utilized a different form of partnership to produce a special report called, “Invisible Families, the Homeless You Don’t See.” The project was produced as part of a fellowship through Seattle University, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The Times received one of the fellowship grants to use as it saw fit. Other fellows included journalists from three other media organizations and two freelance journalists.

    Payne wrote, “In our case, the Invisible Families project from last August employed both of these angles to arrive at a compelling package for both print and online: grant money from Seattle University helped fund work on the project, and our partnerships with local news blogs helped bring diverse coverage to the project.”

     Learn more about the project.

    For the Next 7 Generations

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 3/16/2011 10:57:11 AM

     7Generations Dear Friends, 

    On Friday, April 1, Seattle University’s Center for the Study of Justice in Society (CSJS) and the Chief Seattle Club will host a campus screening of the documentary, “For the Next 7 Generations,” followed by a discussion with Grandmothers Mona Polacca (Havasupai) and Rita Pitka Blumenstein (Yupik), both members of the International Council of Indigenous Grandmothers.  The event will take place in the Pigott Auditorium on Seattle University’s campus from 6:30-9 PM. All ticket proceeds will benefit the Chief Seattle Club whose mission is to provide a sacred space to nurture, affirm and renew the spirit of urban Native Peoples. 

    If you are able to attend the film screening, please RSVP to me at lasprogg@seattleu.edu.    

    Sincerely, 

    Gail 

    Gail A. Lasprogata
    Director, Center for the Study of Justice in Society
    http://www.seattleu.edu/CSJS/Associate Professor of Business Law
    Seattle University
     

     

    Global African Studies Program: A Student Perspective

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 3/15/2011 01:18:19 PM

     Global African StudiesMy name is Rezina Habtemariam and I am a Senior International Studies major and Global African Studies minor at Seattle University. I had the opportunity to study abroad in Senegal last August and just recently returned in January. Prior to embarking on this journey, the SU’s Global African Studies Program provided me with the solid foundation that I needed to truly grasp and maximize my experience. I have taken classes with both Professor Adejumobi and Professor Taiwo and the content of those courses still resonate with me. I was introduced to influential leaders like Patrice Lumumba, DuBois, Douglass, Ida B. Wells etc… This only created a greater desire in me to learn all that I can about Africa as well as the African Diaspora.  

    Professor Taiwo’s Perspective on Aid and Africa course was truly a life changing class. It completely shattered my naïve and undeveloped perception about aid and its manifestation in the African continent. Learning about prominent figures and reading imperative African literature inspired me to continue to learn and to travel abroad.  

    The Global African Studies Program is what attracted me to SU and is why I have stayed at SU. In addition to the incredible courses offered, the program hosts amazing on-campus events. For example, just last night, GAST along with the Central District Forum hosted Iyasah Shabazz – Malcolm X’s daughter and screened Princes Among Slaves – a documentary about a West African prince who was enslaved and brought to America.  I truly believe that GAST has provided the opportunity and space to discuss imperative issues as well as to learn what may not be included in our text books. The Global African Studies Program has allowed me to grow intellectually and continues to shape the person I am becoming.  

    Rezina Habtemariam, ‘11 

     

    2011 Alumni Award Winners Announced!

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 3/3/2011 02:52:55 PM

     26th AA 

    Seattle University’s Alumni Board of Governors is delighted to announce this year’s Alumni Award recipients, all of whom represent what is best about our university and its alumni. Please consider joining us on April 5 to celebrate their achievements!   

    We will recognize and honor their outstanding contributions to our community at the 2011 Annual Alumni Awards Celebration, President’s Club and Legacy Society Dinner on April 5, 2011 beginning at 5:30 pm in the Campion Ballroom on campus. Tickets are $25 per person.  

    Alumna of the Year:  Betty Petri Hedreen, ‘57 

    Professional Achievement Award:  William Marler, ‘87 

    University Service Award:  Anita Crawford-Willis, ‘82, ‘86 

    Community Service Award:  Ezra Teshome, ‘76 

    Distinguished Teaching Award:  Toni Vezeau, RN, PhD 

    Outstanding Recent Alumnus: Ryan Schmid, ‘07 

    Read about each winner’s accomplishments.    

    Email registration or call 206-296-5664.  

     

    SUYI: Committed to Enriching Children’s Lives

    Posted by Amanda Kelly on 3/3/2011 09:44:32 AM

     SUYI1 

    On February 14, Seattle University President Stephen Sundborg, S.J. announced the launch of the Seattle University Youth Initiative (SUYI). The initiative will bring the university’s entire campus community together to improve the academic achievement of low-income youth living in the Bailey Gatzert neighborhood, provide support for vulnerable families and strengthen the university’s educational programs.    

    The Youth Initiative will be a long-term campus-wide commitment by faculty, staff and students to join parents, the Seattle School District, the City of Seattle, faith communities and more than 30 community organizations to help children succeed in grades K-12, attend college and succeed in life.   

    Children and families living in the area served by Bailey Gatzert, just south of SU, face significant challenges. For example, youth violence and juvenile incarceration are among the highest in Seattle. Many area youth face significant academic challenges throughout their educational experience, creating barriers to graduating from high school - and a lack of access to higher education.   

    “Our dedication to helping and working side by side with underserved populations and those in need is proven and unwavering,” said President Sundborg. “The crisis is acute in our own backyard, and with community-building collaboration, we can make a difference.”